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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Have never had the misfortune of a flat tyre whilst away from home but recently started to get my alloys refurbished, removing one wheel at a time and taking to garage. I found when removing the bolts I couldn't release the wheel, had to go buy a rubber mallet. Useful discovery, shall keep that in the boot now just in case.

I then thought about grease and did some googling and the topic of should one grease bolts and the hub seems to divide opinion rather.

I think leaving the bolts dry seemed best as not to interfere with torq setting or risk of coming loose. However greasing the hub seemed a good idea and a lot of people mention copper grease. I don't have any of that but do have a tub of LM Grease which states that it has a high melting point and is largely intended for wheel bearings, so I was wondering if it would be OK to use that on the hubs and corresponding inner surface of the alloy?
 

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I'd stick to copper grease, halfords or any motor factor will sell you a tub of it, and you've got it for years, bearing grease might work its way onto your disks.

Personally, I always lightly grease the threads of my bolts to prevent seizing, and if I get a troublesome wheel, generally a couple of hefty kicks to the tyre helps loosen it
 

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The reason most people recommend copper grease is because its the right stuff for the job - has anti-seize properties. You can buy small tubes of it - you don't need to use much - just a smear does the job........
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies.

Are you suggesting by a smear that the whole front surface of the hub doesn't need it on, as one of them small tubes doesn't look enough to do all four?
 

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It should do plenty, a small tube will typically last me a couple of years, and I use it as an anti seize on loads of things.

If you don't want to coat the whole hub, coat the inside of the wheel where it meets the hub, as the surface area is much smaller
 
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lightly oil the hub, not the holes or the bolts.

In future if your wheel is stuck on the hub, bump the tyre part of the spare wheel off tyre of the stuck rim...... no need to buy rubber hammers.
 

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The oil will just get thrown off as the wheel rotates. Copper grease is the correct tool for this job. I got a baked bean sized tin from my local motor factors for under £5.
 

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I got a baked bean sized tin from my local motor factors for under £5.
:thumbs:
Yep, the tins are usually only slightly more than the tiny tubes.
If it is only for DIY, a tin will last forever but a little tube will run out when you need it most!
 

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You should first give the surface a good wire brushing to remove any corrosion and then use a very thin coating of anti sieze compound like copper slip over the hub face to separate the 2 metal surfaces. the reason they corrode is because of dissimilar metals they produce a small electrical charge which causes the corrosion.
You should use a very small amount of oil on all threads, if the threads are dry then a bigger percentage of the applied tightening torque is taken up with the friction of the thread and not applied as a clamping force of the bolt
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Got a 500g tub in the end as it seemed pointless buying a tube for not a lot less. Not used yet as job has grown. So far wire brushed up two wheel hubs and 8 wheel bolts, going to paint hubs, the part you can see with some VHT paint, not the face that contacts with the wheel, when am away at family house over Xmas. Going to get a rotary wire brush drill attachment so I can give the wheel nuts another going over and then a coat of clear lacquer. Got a garage at parents home to pop in and out of the cold. The alloys are still to be refurbished so not ready for the copper grease just yet.
 

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You should first give the surface a good wire brushing to remove any corrosion and then use a very thin coating of anti sieze compound like copper slip over the hub face to separate the 2 metal surfaces. the reason they corrode is because of dissimilar metals they produce a small electrical charge which causes the corrosion.
Exactly the reason I use a high melting point grease. Introducing copper into the mix is doing no use at all, it's the grease that does the job in this case not the copper. You just need to keep the salty water off the roads away from your hubs and alloys.
 
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