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Well, I usually surf on a Japanese news website in English which contains newsources from various places and here are some of the highlights of today:

- Man admits dismembering his sister
- Unemployed man busted for confining 2 women in handcuffs for 12 hours
- Jobless woman busted for abusing son who died suspiciously (Mainichi)
- Man arrested for killing mom after she tells him to get a job (Mainichi)
- Dismembered body of woman found in brother's room

:(

And this is Japan, a "safe" country :eek:

Where is the bloody world coming to? :rant: :mad:
 
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Yes, shocking! This is mainly 'family crime' though, yes? That will always happen, anywhere, when people 'flip' or are mentally unbalanced. As I understand it, street crime, burglary and organised crime are low in Japan?
 

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It's nature's way of dealing with overcrowding.

Research done with rats (as humans, they are sociable creatures) shows that they seek out the company of other rats if they're alone ( X rats per square meter of cage).

At a critical point they start geting stressed and at a higher crowding ratio they start fighting.


Ralf S.
 

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No worse than fred n rosie west or the prostitute killings in suffolk just recently, and by the way why are you over in japan,and have you seen godzilla or mothra.
 

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what line of work are you in (if you don't mind me asking)? Sushi chef? Sumo wrestler? :)
 
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VO2Max said:
Yes, shocking! This is mainly 'family crime' though, yes? That will always happen, anywhere, when people 'flip' or are mentally unbalanced. As I understand it, street crime, burglary and organised crime are low in Japan?

That's also the case in most "civilised" countries.
You're more likely to be attacked & killed by family and
close friends than by a total stranger.

Now that is scary!
:( :eek: :eek:
 

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Now I feel stupid, what an earth does a "derivatives structurer" do?

Please don't say "Structures derivatives" :)
 

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the power of google:

"Structurers that Dr. Risk knows tend to have high IQs and strong quantitative backgrounds. They’re problem solvers. An engineering, physics, or applied math background is ordinary. "

:) Sound like Mr Bigfoot?
 
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I think Mr Bigfoot is multitalented, he must have good qualitative skills too, to be hanging around this joint :D
 

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andrew.deackes said:
the power of google:

"Structurers that Dr. Risk knows tend to have high IQs and strong quantitative backgrounds. They’re problem solvers. An engineering, physics, or applied math background is ordinary. "

:) Sound like Mr Bigfoot?
Clearly Dr Risk doesn't know me ;) :lol:
 

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andrew.deackes said:
Now I feel stupid, what an earth does a "derivatives structurer" do?

Please don't say "Structures derivatives" :)

Just realised I actually never answered your question.

My job consists in directing* a small team of people in creating custom-made investments for institutional investors (banks, insurers, funds) that provide the required risk/return profiles and which are referenced to the credit risk of pools of companies (in general). We also market transaction that are sourced by my colleagues in other location and provide customer support to the local salespeople.

A derivative is a financial product whose value is referenced to something else. The most basic type of derivative is a "forward". This gives the seller and buyer of something (a share, a bond, a ton of coffee beans, etc) the obligation to buy/sell a certain quantity of whatever they are transacting, for a pre-specified price, but at a future date.

So, if between the trade date and the actual sale date, the price of that something goes up, the buyer is better off (as they can sell the something right away and make a profit), if the price goes down, the seller is happy as he's sold the something at a price higher than the current market.

Clearly the benefit of a forward, and of all derivatives, lies on the fact that the derivative contract has removed the price fluctuation of the something for both counterparts and thus minimised their risk.

Cheers!


*ie. doing all the work :rant:
 

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Blimey BigFoot, that sounds very complicated! Glad I only have to deal with firewalls and the like, much simpler :)
 

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Doesn't Japan have one of the highest prevalences of mental illness? It cerainly sounds like it from the newsources :eek:
 
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