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Voting now open for the previous entries September 2021 AO Detailing Competition Vote

Vote for whoever you think deserves to win (y)


October Detailing competition now open for entries October 2021 Detailing Competition Entries

Don't let the title put you off, it doesn't have to be a full detail, a wash & a clean will do, if the car looks good take some pics & submit them, please include some info on what you have done to the car (y)

Check out the updated rules here Monthly Detailing Competition Rules
 

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Gradually getting there with these sills. With a bit of hindsight I think the proper eBay sills run the full length and under the front wing would make for the easiest and best job because you can plug weld upwards into the chassis and do the continuous weld vertically as you go along the body. I have a join underneath which is going to get nasty unless I can tip the car up a lot higher.
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Silenced my creaking clutch pedal; failed with a variety of methods because the push-rod bush jammed on its shaft and I didn’t dare force it for fear of breaking the master cylinder. Eventually I found that (on this design) it’s safe to do that, and that with it disconnected from the pedal and pulled back and to one side it would pop free of the piston by a couple of mm. I injected red rubber grease into the gap with a syringe and worked it around by rotating the rod. Silence. I really hope it lasts because I hadn’t realised how much the creak was bugging me until it was gone.
So, I took it for a drive only to find that I was getting a severe jolt when changing gear, particularly 2nd to 3rd when applying some power. Whaaat!

Had my DMF chosen this moment to fail?

Had the rubber grease changed the clutch feel so much? OK, I’ll relearn the clutch. Better, but something still isn’t right.

Went to use the cruise control; no cruise control. Ah!

Clutch switch!

Reset the clutch switch and all is back to normal. I had no idea my ecu did clutch triggerred gear change assist via the throttle. Is that a 20 valve thing or do they all do it?

Anyhow, note to self. Next time, remember the clutch switch….
 

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Took the 156 to Penrith to have a skirt reapplied and a new power steering pump fitted (y)
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I only jacked the nearside hoping the weight on the other wheel would lift the anti-roll bar enough to allow the wishbone to sit horizontally, but in the end I had to wind it up a bit with a Spanish windlass to the top wishbone mounting.
The trick is to jack up the other side. Take the wheel off and jack under the lower wishbone knuckle. That lifts the ARB so you can get the new lower wishbone into its home. I used waterpump pliers to rotate the bush clamps at the right angle to sit properly on the subframe, and not cross thread the bolts.
 

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Got a wheel alignment done after replacing shock absorbers, wishbones and other bits. The upper wishbones had hung on well, they appeared original at 19 years and 190,000 kms. Or so the date stamps indicated. Now just a oil change and brake fluid this month, as well as a WoF (NZ MOT).
 

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Booked it in for an MOT failure. I know it needs some things, I want to know what else it needs on top of what I’ve budgeted for. I’ll get back to you all on Tuesday
Surprisingly, not much more above the expected tyres and brakes. Needs a bit of welding on the inner sills, which is a bit of a pisser since it was welded last year as well. Have to change my headlight bulbs from HID to normal ones but other than that. Not a terrible showing. Hopefully i can put some more miles on it soon
 

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Are those ti wheels on your GT? They look great on the GT.

Sorry I was AFK for a while. Yes these are Ti wheels, but I assume either some kind of special edition or replicas because they are 7.5J wide and from what I gathered the Ti wheels were 7J wide.
 

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So my DIY timing belt change might have bit me back in the ass.

I took a peak under the timing belt cover and it looks as if the outer side of the belt is already being worn out, only after 3-400 kms.

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I guess with a belt like this the car will sleep through the winter.
 

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2008 147 passed MOT today, with no advisories. Which is odd, because last year the same tester gave me advisories on both inner track rod ends. He's a bit of a stickler but I think that's no bad thing. Still, I could find nothing absolutely wrong with them before or after that test, so didn't replace them. This year I am glad to say they have apparently healed themselves :)

I suspect he noticed that the steering tended to groan occasionally, even after I changed the fluid. However, this summer I replaced the remaining 'old' upper and lower wishbone and driveshaft. Now all front wishbones have been replaced, the groaning has gone.

The same guy gave me an advisory on a slightly frayed seatbelt a 4 years ago. When I looked closely enough, there was just a very slight hint of fluffiness to one edge. I ran a cigarette lighter flame along it, just enough to seal the fluff. No more advisory on that.

Why keep going back to a tester who's harsh? Because he is good. The year I didn't - because he was booked up - I tried another place, recommended by a neighbour. Their tester managed to carelessly nick the balljoint boot of a top wishbone with his pry bar - I could see the witness marks! He didn't mention that. Instead he gave me an advisory and said they could fit a new one for about £100. It was a pretty new (1 year) wishbone that nobody except he had ever touched since I checked it visually 2 days earlier. I cleaned it up with acetone, and did an artistic repair on the boot with black silicone, which passed the next MOT c/o Mr Stickler and lasted until I replaced the upper and lower wishbone and driveshaft on that side.
 

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So my DIY timing belt change might have bit me back in the ass.

I took a peak under the timing belt cover and it looks as if the outer side of the belt is already being worn out, only after 3-400 kms.

View attachment 960997

I guess with a belt like this the car will sleep through the winter.
Hard to imagine how that could happen - although it looks to me more like the main width of the back of the belt is getting scuffed. Which might happen if you have a defective or wrongly-installed idler pulley that is dragging on the belt.
 

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Hard to imagine how that could happen - although it looks to me more like the main width of the back of the belt is getting scuffed. Which might happen if you have a defective or wrongly-installed idler pulley that is dragging on the belt.

I do have a washer lying around that looks as it came with the timing belt kit, because it's so shiny. As far as I remember the idler pulley was rotating fine and I was able to rotate it freely. I checked it a couple of times and every time it looked fine.
 

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The trick is to jack up the other side. Take the wheel off and jack under the lower wishbone knuckle. That lifts the ARB so you can get the new lower wishbone into its home. I used waterpump pliers to rotate the bush clamps at the right angle to sit properly on the subframe, and not cross thread the bolts.
I think I like my windlass, it was quick and avoided having to do anything on the other side of the car, but rotating the bush clamps sounds good. Thanks.
 

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I do have a washer lying around that looks as it came with the timing belt kit, because it's so shiny. As far as I remember the idler pulley was rotating fine and I was able to rotate it freely. I checked it a couple of times and every time it looked fine.
Possibly 12? ... if your washer is 22mm dia with an M10 hole....

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Had a hairy drive to the specialist as I threw in the towel with the brake pipes.

Planned a route that avoided all fast roads as I only had the rear ancient brakes and one brand new not even bedded in front and the completely dead side. A brake test on a completely empty road showed some extremely wobbly braking characteristics! The dual carriageway turn off I'd normally take is down a slope at the national speed limit which wouldn't have ended well if I went that way!


Only got the rear callipers to install and wheel arches to reattach I guess after tho so almost there!
 

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I do have a washer lying around that looks as it came with the timing belt kit, because it's so shiny. As far as I remember the idler pulley was rotating fine and I was able to rotate it freely. I checked it a couple of times and every time it looked fine.
My money's on it scuffng on the plastic timing cover somewhere. It looks like it is tracking correctly around the pulleys or it would be off line.
 

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Got a wheel alignment done after replacing shock absorbers, wishbones and other bits. The upper wishbones had hung on well, they appeared original at 19 years and 190,000 kms. Or so the date stamps indicated. Now just a oil change and brake fluid this month, as well as a WoF (NZ MOT).
2008 147 passed MOT today, with no advisories. Which is odd, because last year the same tester gave me advisories on both inner track rod ends. He's a bit of a stickler but I think that's no bad thing. Still, I could find nothing absolutely wrong with them before or after that test, so didn't replace them. This year I am glad to say they have apparently healed themselves :)

I suspect he noticed that the steering tended to groan occasionally, even after I changed the fluid. However, this summer I replaced the remaining 'old' upper and lower wishbone and driveshaft. Now all front wishbones have been replaced, the groaning has gone.

The same guy gave me an advisory on a slightly frayed seatbelt a 4 years ago. When I looked closely enough, there was just a very slight hint of fluffiness to one edge. I ran a cigarette lighter flame along it, just enough to seal the fluff. No more advisory on that.

Why keep going back to a tester who's harsh? Because he is good. The year I didn't - because he was booked up - I tried another place, recommended by a neighbour. Their tester managed to carelessly nick the balljoint boot of a top wishbone with his pry bar - I could see the witness marks! He didn't mention that. Instead he gave me an advisory and said they could fit a new one for about £100. It was a pretty new (1 year) wishbone that nobody except he had ever touched since I checked it visually 2 days earlier. I cleaned it up with acetone, and did an artistic repair on the boot with black silicone, which passed the next MOT c/o Mr Stickler and lasted until I replaced the upper and lower wishbone and driveshaft on that side.
A bit of an open Q, how hard is it to replace the suspension front and rear?

I know the rears are a bit McPherson like with a multi link element.

And the fronts have double wishbones.

I've changed the suspension on another car over the Summer, a crummy Honda Civic with conventional McPherson Struts front and Torsion beam rear.

My shocks are pretty rusty now, fairly shocking for Koni which were in good condition 7 years ago.

Specialist said go Bilstein, I might reuse the Eibach springs although new ones aren't that much more...
 

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A bit of an open Q, how hard is it to replace the suspension front and rear?
Long post!

It took me 7 weeks! On and off working on it in my garage. Need some special socket for strut nuts. 19mm for front, 22mm for rear. For me undoing things was not hard, but with rust some of those bolts would be a lot harder, or impossible and requiring new bolts for sure. I also replaced the gear selector plastic bits, which added lots of time as the rusty nuts on the exhaust were hard to move (I had to wait on delivery for some tools).

Rear shocks easier than the fronts, for compressing the springs at least and orientating all parts correctly. Rear suspension parts like the trailing arms and transverse arms can be done independently of the shock/strut. I also did the hub bushes. Removed the hub and managed to hammer out and hammer in a new bush. Have a brake piston windback tool handy to keep the piston wound back, otherwise it might pop right out and be hard to put back in (happened to me on one side). It's a worthwhile consideration to get a garage to remove/replace the bush too. The rear suspension is also mostly lighter to handle, and there are no driveshafts or other bits in the way.

Buy new rubber spring seating bits when you are doing it. The lower front rubbers are quite cheap, but the upper rubber ring is fairly expensive so you might be able to re-use it. The front springs are compressed so much on the strut, so if you re-use them and transfer them over to your new shock keep them compressed and do it in one event. Otherwise it's a big effort. The uncoiled spring is about twice the length on it on the strut. Or you could get a garage to do it for you. Front strut top is also a little hard to align properly and may take a few goes. I had some problems with the spring, but once it's all in and the car weight on it it seems to come right (hopefully).

The lower arm is a pain to do if done by itself. But if you are removing the strut and top wishbone and stuff then it's much easier to fit and line up. I fitted that first, then squeezed in the top wishbone/strut and wrestled a bit to make the strut fit with the 'tuning fork'. I kept the driveshafts on (but undid the steering tie rod end as I fitted new ends, probably not necessary).

There were lots of stones in the rear subframe where the transverse arms bolts go through. Blow them out with compressed air and you will be able to move/adjust the bolts. Or the people who do the wheel alignment afterwards will be able to.

I think 4 or 5 hours for each corner of the car. Especially if you are compressing springs and everything and having a clean around and general look about. Well that's what it probably took me (or a bit more, but who's counting...)
 

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Long post!

It took me 7 weeks! On and off working on it in my garage. Need some special socket for strut nuts. 19mm for front, 22mm for rear. For me undoing things was not hard, but with rust some of those bolts would be a lot harder, or impossible and requiring new bolts for sure. I also replaced the gear selector plastic bits, which added lots of time as the rusty nuts on the exhaust were hard to move (I had to wait on delivery for some tools).

Rear shocks easier than the fronts, for compressing the springs at least and orientating all parts correctly. Rear suspension parts like the trailing arms and transverse arms can be done independently of the shock/strut. I also did the hub bushes. Removed the hub and managed to hammer out and hammer in a new bush. Have a brake piston windback tool handy to keep the piston wound back, otherwise it might pop right out and be hard to put back in (happened to me on one side). It's a worthwhile consideration to get a garage to remove/replace the bush too. The rear suspension is also mostly lighter to handle, and there are no driveshafts or other bits in the way.

Buy new rubber spring seating bits when you are doing it. The lower front rubbers are quite cheap, but the upper rubber ring is fairly expensive so you might be able to re-use it. The front springs are compressed so much on the strut, so if you re-use them and transfer them over to your new shock keep them compressed and do it in one event. Otherwise it's a big effort. The uncoiled spring is about twice the length on it on the strut. Or you could get a garage to do it for you. Front strut top is also a little hard to align properly and may take a few goes. I had some problems with the spring, but once it's all in and the car weight on it it seems to come right (hopefully).

The lower arm is a pain to do if done by itself. But if you are removing the strut and top wishbone and stuff then it's much easier to fit and line up. I fitted that first, then squeezed in the top wishbone/strut and wrestled a bit to make the strut fit with the 'tuning fork'. I kept the driveshafts on (but undid the steering tie rod end as I fitted new ends, probably not necessary).

There were lots of stones in the rear subframe where the transverse arms bolts go through. Blow them out with compressed air and you will be able to move/adjust the bolts. Or the people who do the wheel alignment afterwards will be able to.

I think 4 or 5 hours for each corner of the car. Especially if you are compressing springs and everything and having a clean around and general look about. Well that's what it probably took me (or a bit more, but who's counting...)
Dammn that actually looks quite involved...

The suspension on the Honda was child's play. Rear torsion beam was literally a top bolt and a lower bolt, repeat on both sides then the entire beam drops. Place new spring and shock in.

Fronts were slightly harder, but I built the new strut in my house before tacking the car. Used a manual spring compressor to assemble spring, top mount and bearing. After getting the drop links out it was only two lower bolts and three upper ones. Each side took an hour with an assembled strut. Rear was something stupid like 20 mins. So an entire ordinary car can be done in the time to one corner of a 156 o_O

My suspension isn't on it's last legs yet but I'll watch some videos and see how others have done it too.

Thanks!!
 

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Fronts were slightly harder, but I built the new strut in my house before tacking the car.
Hard to do that here, even if you bought all new parts (shock, spring etc) you still need to buy the top metal plate which has two studs sticking out the top, probably get one s/hand. The plate sits on the strut shaft and then the top rubber mount fits on the top secured by a nut. It's this plate that holds the top of the spring with a rubber ring.
On the 156 this top metal plate which has to studs that pop through wheel arch need to be in the right position so the tuning fork can attach to the bottom of the strut. Then the tuning fork can attach onto the lower wishbone correctly. But the 156 springs are very narrow on the front so it can be hard to get spring compressors to fit nicely. I scratched the paint off the shocks a couple of times too :(.

This was the biggest suspension job I had ever done on a car. All I had really done before was remove and replace lower front control arms on a BP Subaru legacy (very easy in comparison). And a lower wishbone on my 156 a few years ago as a temporary fix when one split it's balljoint boot. So it was a learning experience to say the least.

I would consider doing the rears first (in light of rusty spring pans where you live), and breaking up the ordeal into easier portions. At the end of my ordeal and the the height of my abilities I think I did one rear side in 4/5 hours with tea breaks and general cleaning etc. 1.5 hours of that was spent removing the old hub bush!

If you have time, a space for the car to be out of action and a spare mode of transport it's worth the financial saving I think. Unless you earn the big bucks!
 
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