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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,

I am now the proud owner of some lovely Focal 165 VR speakers to go in my front doors (shortly followed by some Focal 165 CVX to go in the back!)

I can fit them myself, including the tweeters, I've done this before. But I've never had a separate crossover before! Where's a good place to put it and how do I fix it, in a facelift 156?

Before you ask, I already have some Dynamat-type stuff! Although any advice on using that would be very welcome too! ;)

Thanks all :thumbs:
 

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AO Silver Member, 155 Lounge Winner 09
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where will you install the tweeter? put the xover in the same 'area' as the tweeter. that is, both in the doors or both in cabin; this simplifies wiring.

keep the crossovers away from moisture/water (ie: don't put them INSIDE the door cavity), and away from sources of interference (eg: away from ECU, fusebox, etc). if in the doors, you can secure them to the surface of the doors behind the door trims. either screw them to the metal, or use cable ties.

you can direct the original speakerwire from the factory woofer to the 'input' of the crossovers (cut off plug, and may need to extend the wiring). new wire to the new door woofer/tweeter.

when applying the dynamat, use it to seal over the service holes in the doors. this will help create a 'sealed enclosure' for the woofer to work in - much better midbass. i prefer to fit cut 3mm mdf panels to cover the holes for a more rigid result (and slap a coat of paint over them to help protect against moisture.

here's pics from my GT to give you an idea:
http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL97/467659/19095446/319614674.jpg
http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL97/467659/19095446/313625228.jpg
http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL97/467659/19095446/314773594.jpg
http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL97/467659/19095446/319618173.jpg

:)
 
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Hi Shiny,

the front speakers are fitted.

The Focal tweeters fit in the orifice that the old ones used to go in, I stuck them in with some silicone adhesive. I put them on -3dB (in the X-over) seeing as they're at head height and close to my ears. The mid/bass units fitted in nicely and I sealed the holes around the mounting plate (where the grille lugs attach) with some stiff plastic, sealed with more silicone sealant! I got some Brown Bread (cockney rhyming slang for 'dead'!) deadening material (similar to Dynomat but a whole lot cheaper) and applied liberally to the door and behind the mid/bass unit. I didn't have the time or the inclination to fill all the holes in the inner door skin with MDF and filler so I won't have quite as much (or quality of) bass as you. I mounted the X-overs just forward of the door handles, there is a nice space there - I fixed them to the door skin with adhesive pads and more silicone sealant. They ain't going anywhere in a hurry!

First impressions are good! The treble certainly isn't overpowering or harsh (which I have read about these speakers) and the bottom end is quite firm, if not earth-shattering. The stereo image is very good. Overall the sound is neutral and dynamic.

I'm expecting there to be more bass when I fit the rears in the rear doors, I tend to drive the front/rears in a 50/50 ratio, I still get good stereo and the rears give a sense of space (and entertainment for any passengers).

If I'm still missing out on deep bass (which I suspect I will), I'll keep an eye out for a Bose sub to put in the boot - unless you have any good ideas for a smallish but quality sub? ;)

Cheers :thumbs:
 

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AO Silver Member, 155 Lounge Winner 09
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good work. i've used a bit of Brown Bread in the past. it's not bad, and does the job. whilst i don't think it's as good as Dynamat Xtreme, i have no proof of this! (though there are comparative articles on the net, looking at effectiveness, based upon reductions in resonance, decibels, ability to stick in extreme (heat) conditions, etc.)

one problem with rear speakers in the 156 - which i discovered - was that having these speakers in the rear doors, made them fairly 'audible' from the front seat. they are actually quite close to your ears compared with the front speakers. as such, the 'soundstage' was dragged backwards and downwards, instead of sounding 'upfront and high'. i guess many people may not care or even notice, but it's not ideal to the enthusiast.

when i fitted rears, i ended up changing them to the parcel shelf, which i modified to accommodate them.

a Bose sub will 'fit' nicely in the boot, presuming it's from a 156 saloon. but i don't think your car will have the attendant wiring for the full Bose setup (ie: amplifier wiring loom). so you need to consider what amplifier you'll use (Bose or aftermarket).

ultimately, a quality non-Bose sub, in its required subbox (ie: each sub is different in subbox requirements in terms of the box size and being 'sealed' vs 'ported/vented' vs other), will perform better. the Bose is only a small 6.5" jobbie, with lowish power handling and lowish cone excursion.

you are best to seek advice from a local specialist ICE store, to discuss things like:
*how big a subbox you will be happy with
*where to place the box in the boot
*whether you want a custom part-fibreglass box that can be 'integrated'/built into the side of the boot; will be relatively expensive
*what amplifier and where to mount it

there's heaps of great 10" subs on the market that work nicely in smallish 'sealed' boxes (no bigger than 1cuft nett internal volume). for example, the JL audio 10W1v2/10W3v3, image dynamics ID10/IDQ10v3, alpine type-S/type-R, boston acoustics G110/G210, etc.

:)
 

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What does the dynamat stuff do. I am new to all the ICE stuff and would like to do a great sound system in my GTV
 

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AO Silver Member, 155 Lounge Winner 09
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Dynamat is a brand of sound deadener, of which there's many brands. it is self adhesive, to stick onto the (metal) surfaces of your car doors, boot, and other interior panels.

it primarily reduces resonance/audible rattles, which are both annoying and can 'colour' the sound quality of the music. it works by adding weight (hence, reducing the resonant frequency of panels, which is the frequency (Hz) at which the panels vibrate most vigorously; a lower frequency is less audible to the point of being inaudible), and converting kinetic energy (vibrations) into thermal energy (heat).

secondary benefits include making the car/panels/doors more rigid, and some minor sound proofing against roadnoise. downsides are weight.

but the benefits for sound quality can be significant, and it's a product that is usually overlooked unless you're 'into' car audio. it can be slapped right over gaping holes, which is very beneficial in the doors cos creating a 'sealed enclosure' for the door woofers to operate in, greatly improves bass.

:)
 
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