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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was looking to do this sometime in the future as I am not completely satisfied with the brake performance but it has become more urgent lately as the o/s front caliper sticks on from time to time and so gets a tad hot :lol: (which I presume is a caliper fault)

I have standard 1300 brakes with Ferodo DS2500 pads and a 2000 engine.

I have looked at the options and they seem to be these:
1. New (front) calipers with sports discs and Ferodo DS2500 pads
2. Uprated brake kit from either Alfaholics or Classic Alfa both look good but expensive :wow:.
3. Keep everything standard but renew front calipers.

So guys, what do I go for? I am looking to do occasional track days (2/3 per year max); I do drive ''enthusiastically'' on the road so do I need to full on 4 pot calipers, they do look nice and will certainly stop me :D or will standard size sports discs (grooved) with new calipers and DS2500 suffice?

Is there anybody out there that has uprated their system

I am only looking to do the front as the rear is working ok.

Cheers
Adrian
 

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sorry, can't help on upgrade tips, but as regards the o/s front caliper sticking on, this can be something as simple as the flexible brake hose on that wheel has collapsed inside (ie. it won't let the fluid flow back)....worth a try in the meantime:)
 

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If one of your options is renewing front calipers a further option is to replace with calipers from a 75. I did this on my 1600GT front suspension and it's an easy swap. Also fitted sports slotted discs. Note that the brake disc area is not increased by anything, so theoretically brake performance doing both of these is not improved. But the calipers are substantially lighter so there's a big improvement in unsprung weight. And when I bought mine they were lower cost than 105 calipers.

Also fitted braided hoses all round and recent new master cylinder. Despite all this I still have the original ABS system (i.e. the brakes just aren't strong enough to lock the front wheels in the dry) but they are not far short. Rears lock up though, so there may be a balance issue.

I think I use my car similarly to yours and I'm generally happy at my level of driving skill but I have to say that a big front brake kit would be on my wish list, though not at the top of it.
 

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If one of your options is renewing front calipers a further option is to replace with calipers from a 75. I did this on my 1600GT front suspension and it's an easy swap. Also fitted sports slotted discs. Note that the brake disc area is not increased by anything, so theoretically brake performance doing both of these is not improved. But the calipers are substantially lighter so there's a big improvement in unsprung weight. And when I bought mine they were lower cost than 105 calipers.

Also fitted braided hoses all round and recent new master cylinder. Despite all this I still have the original ABS system (i.e. the brakes just aren't strong enough to lock the front wheels in the dry) but they are not far short. Rears lock up though, so there may be a balance issue.

I think I use my car similarly to yours and I'm generally happy at my level of driving skill but I have to say that a big front brake kit would be on my wish list, though not at the top of it.

There would be a surface increase, as the 1300 discs and calipers are smaller than the larger engines. So an upgrade to 2000 gtv uprights, discs calipers, or those from a 75, would give him increased surface. But he would need to change to gtv uprights if upgrading to either of this options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks for the input so far. Upgrading to 2000 or 1750 uprights hmmm is this viable? This would give me bigger brakes. Is this a fairly easy job to do? Does anybody out there know?
Cheers
Adrian

Edit: This is looking a good option slightly increased braking area so more braking performance as nice as four pot braking would be I don't think it is really necessary for me and of course there is the cost consideration.
 

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My wife's '69 1300 GT Junior has Brembo calipers from an Alfa 75 and the stopping power is very good; you get the larger pads but without the need to change the uprights or discs, although the spacers in the calipers need to be removed to centralise the discs.

I have 2000 GTV brakes on my 1600 Giulia and the stopping power is fantastic with uprated pads.

Either route would be a worthwhile mod and I'm sure you'd be pleased with the outcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My wife's '69 1300 GT Junior has Brembo calipers from an Alfa 75 and the stopping power is very good; you get the larger pads but without the need to change the uprights or discs, although the spacers in the calipers need to be removed to centralise the discs.

I have 2000 GTV brakes on my 1600 Giulia and the stopping power is fantastic with uprated pads.

Either route would be a worthwhile mod and I'm sure you'd be pleased with the outcome.
hmm very interesting; I like the idea of the Alfa 75 calipers, they would be a lot lighter as well.:)
 

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OK , on my 1600GT junior Ferodo ds2500 pads, grooved brake discs , stainless steel braided

hoses.

No issues with braking on fast road and track days @ Goodwood ,Spa , Monza Oulton . I

am not however a young gun but don't do so bad.

Hope that helps.

Ian
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Ok thanks for your input; it would certainly be cheaper staying ''standard'' size wise at any rate.

I have bought some braided hoses to try and eradicate the ''sticky brakes'' problem which will also improve the feel, so I might leave it at that for the moment whilst I consider all the options, unless that doesn't cure the fault.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well I have fitted the braided hoses and that has not eliminated the fault with the brakes sticking on occasionally :(. When they stick on they can be freed by pressing the pedal again.

So Alfisti where do I look next master cylinder, callipers or servo?
 

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If it is only the OSF caliper sticking then I would suggest the bores are crusty enough to stop smooth piston movement. It is possible to clean them up, fitting new seals if necessary. Also check to ensure the pads are free to move easily and not jamming in the aperture.

Are the pads quite worn? As the pads wear the piston moves further out to compensate. Fitting new pads would require the pistons to operate further back in the bores in a "cleaner" zone which hasn't got corroded and therefore retain the ability to move without sticking.

If it is both front calipers sticking then, on a car with two servos, I would first look at the front-circuit servo. The piston could be sticking in the servo body or the vacuum hose to the inlet manifold could have delaminated internally. I had this happen on my old 1750 Berlina: the brakes would stay on for a second or two after applying them and then suddenly release. I changed the hose and problem solved.

Of course, exchange calipers are not extortionately expensive and would hopefully solve the problem quickly...
 

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i got new (small 1600) calipers for 100 euro each, brand new. my previous pull-to-the-right issue was resolved instantly as the seals were shot and the whole thing looked terrible.

i can report however, that with standard pads, I smoked them within 5 switchbacks on a steep alpine decent. i'm hoping decent pads will fix it for enthusiastic road use. otherwise I think I'll have the same dilemma as you..... although, I suspect if I ever do any track work, further upgrades will be needed.

for general use though, the new calipers with standard rubber lines seem to stop adequately if you push hard enough
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
i got new (small 1600) calipers for 100 euro each, brand new. my previous pull-to-the-right issue was resolved instantly as the seals were shot and the whole thing looked terrible.

i can report however, that with standard pads, I smoked them within 5 switchbacks on a steep alpine decent. i'm hoping decent pads will fix it for enthusiastic road use. otherwise I think I'll have the same dilemma as you..... although, I suspect if I ever do any track work, further upgrades will be needed.

for general use though, the new calipers with standard rubber lines seem to stop adequately if you push hard enough
They are fine for the odd hard stop but I am sure they won't like prolonged abuse that they would receive on a track day. I am still undecided as to what to do 4 pot brakes are very tempting but also very expensive.
 

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i guess, like you, I am wondering if optimising the standard calipers with good rotors and pads will do, or whether that will be just money wasted and going directly to 4 pot would solve the issue once and for all.

depends on the weak point: overheating should be mostly solved through slotted rotors and good pads. if its lack of outright power, then we need to bigger calipers. one consideration would be track/race rules, if thats what you want to do. some historic classes wont allow brake upgrades such as the 4 pot

now I have the new ATE calipers I suppose I will try to optimize them for now. Im not going to try the alfa 75 calipers as dont want the bother of new uprights and from what Ive read, they re more about the weight improvement than stopping power. The only reason I could see someone going down this route is if they got some 75 calipers/rotors for free.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
i guess, like you, I am wondering if optimising the standard calipers with good rotors and pads will do, or whether that will be just money wasted and going directly to 4 pot would solve the issue once and for all.

depends on the weak point: overheating should be mostly solved through slotted rotors and good pads. if its lack of outright power, then we need to bigger calipers. one consideration would be track/race rules, if thats what you want to do. some historic classes wont allow brake upgrades such as the 4 pot

now I have the new ATE calipers I suppose I will try to optimize them for now. Im not going to try the alfa 75 calipers as dont want the bother of new uprights and from what Ive read, they re more about the weight improvement than stopping power. The only reason I could see someone going down this route is if they got some 75 calipers/rotors for free.....
If you have small brakes ie 1300/1600 you dont need to new uprights they fit on but you do need to get 2000 discs and then dispense with the backing plate.

I think I might just try and optimise the performance of my ATE setup.
 
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