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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

Had tried to unbolt the EGR during the last bank holiday & failed miserably.. Tried following the usual guide, but mine is an 8v 1.9 JTD, so the exhaust & outlet flange bolts are allen head type. After liberal amounts of super crack ultra spray, I could get the egr to cylinder head HEX bolts to move but the allen screws DO NOT BUDGE. :rant::mad:

I didnt bother with it, until recently when my work colleagues got "smoked" out of the car park.:lol: Coincidently, my car has started to feel a bit sluggish & the fuel economy has dropped to 44ish(80% motorway), after it got serviced & MOTed 3 weeks ago. Though I specifically asked for the air filter box to be cleaned prior to a new filter fitment, it may have been missed out..

What should be my first target .. MAF or the EGR?? And any tips to get the damn thing off !
Cheers
 
G

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+1 plusgas... It does the business.
I will add though. what a lot of DIY'rs tend do do is soak bolts and nuts in WD40, or any type of penetration oil... Thats ok.... But take it from an old school time served mechanic, it can also defeat the object!

You have to remember that penetrating oil is: oil and it has slipping properties when it comes to fitting a torx bit, alan key or even a spanner or socket on the offending nut or bolt, this often causes the item you are trying to free off to castle or round off as the tool is harder than the nut/bolt... The oil only adds to the problem making it easier to do

An old trick is to:
Remove any excess rust and deposits with a wire brush.
with your tool off choice for the nut/bolt, give a tap on it with a hammer towards the direction of the bolt downwards to break the obligitary corrosion seal between the two parts
Soak the nut/ bolt, leave it for 15 minutes , it will have done its job by then.
Now the part that no one thinks of: Use brake and clutch cleaner spray to remove the excess penetration oil and offers a nice, dry, oil free surface for the tool to grip onto.

Last part: Don't try to free off at first, actually try to nip the nut/bolt up further just even 1/8th of a turn... Now loosen as normal and apply apply even, firm pressure to your chosen tool without yanking. With allen/torx keys, try using a long bar over the end for more leverage (room permitting) failing that use a ring spanner over the the allan key and apply pressure gently.

Another handy tip when it comes to freeing of damaged or really tight nuts... If it still wont budge. Get hold of a new nut with the same size and thread, aplly a couple of tiny drops of superglue to one face of the new nut and wind the nut down the thread with the glued face down towards the old nut and nip it onto the old nut, matching the flat sides... Leave it to dry for ten minutes and then apply the spanner/ socket over both nuts... It should come out a lot better. Super glue is quite useless when it comes to hard plastics etc. But it grips metal to metal very well... Just be careful not to get any on the thread part.

Removing nylock nuts? Gently heat the nut with a heat gun and the plastic will start to soften... Don't go too far or it will melt all over the thread... As quick as you can, apply the tool to loosen off the nut as the plastic starts to harden slowly and cool down... It will spin off easily the quicker you are at doing it.

Failing all of the above... A heat gun applied directly on the nut /bolt head only followed by a quick tap off a hammer, then loosen off asap before it cools will always do the trick;)
Hope this helps:thumbs:
 

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Heat, AC90, brute force.
Anyone of those 3 at any 1 time works for me. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was thinking along the lines of trying to unbolt it while the engine is hot. Expansion of aluminium should be more than steel which would give me a better chance.
We have breaker bars etc at my workplace, but the space besides the lower exhaust flange is quite small to get any sensible leverage.
But it does sound like an EGR issue isnt it? Wouldnt want to spend 100+£ on a MAF :(
 

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I was thinking along the lines of trying to unbolt it while the engine is hot. Expansion of aluminium should be more than steel which would give me a better chance.
We have breaker bars etc at my workplace, but the space besides the lower exhaust flange is quite small to get any sensible leverage.
But it does sound like an EGR issue isnt it? Wouldnt want to spend 100+£ on a MAF :(
ring spanner hooked through allen key
 

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Hello sakzzz

Some great advice has been passed, but you are fighting a different problem than the age old problem of steel/steel corrosion, rather the reaction of a steel bolt screwed into an alloy thread ( not good long term bedfellows). You may find you have access to the rear and the head of the Allen bolts: if you apply an alloy wheel cleaner (wonder wheels or similar), sparingly, and leave it overnight, then apply some heat/ penetrating fluid you will win the battle of the bolts! You have to accept that there is a chance the Allen bolt will take some thread with it, and make reattachment.....a challenge ! Find another bolt, maybe a different thread and drill/ tapp the hole and components. Not too difficult, certainly an easy task for a good mechanic, and quick/cheap from your point of view if spanners etc. are not your thing. What is a better solution is lose the EGR, and the cooler, linking the water pipe for that straight to the thermostat, but I would check you don't have a split in your turbo hoses, just to be sure. But it probably is the egr...!

Hope that helps, and best of luck

Cheerio
The Captain:thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
UPDATE:

I think, plus gas & brute force did the trick. I was hoping that the EGR was stuck open, hence the smoke. But it was stuck shut. Anyways, I cleaned it it up, the solenoid was moving freely, so didnt need to drill it etc. May be a bit less smoky but I still think, something else may be acting up.

The bit that startled me was this:
Where the EGR outlets in the intake plenum was black, gummed up, tar like deposits...:vomit: Now, the egr valve wasnt gummy, so the only suspect for the oily air to enter, is the turbo pipe entering the intake right besides the EGR. So I unclipped that & sprayed carb cleaner on a cloth and started wiping the innards as far as I could reach.. 3 Cloths down, it was marginally clean, but definitely dirty downstream into the intake. WAs tempted to spray degreaser into it, but knew that would liquefy this soot & settle on valves etc.

Would all diesels have this gunk built up? Felt like a loosing battle to clean oily soot deposits from a diesel engine :rolleyes:
With that done, I will be checking the turbo hoses.Top or bottom is the problematic one? & then it would be the MAF cleaning. Is that approach right? I want to get my "Red Sonja" healthy again :)
 

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Hello zakzzz,

I came to the same conclusion, re oil vapour enters down the breather line, goes into turbo( into the airflow already cleaned through the filter! ) then into the intercooler ( when I bought my car it was replaced, due to stone damage, and the old one had lot of sludge/oil in it). Neither of my cars consume their oil, so where is it coming from? This breather feed must be the culprit. I found a cheap oil catch tank on eBay (£24 delivered) to mount where egr was fitted, and a breather filter ( demon tweaks £30) for the return to the turbo. I also removed the inlet manifold and hot dipped it to get rid of the awful soot build up ( this was on an Alfa with four oil changes a year, always run on best quality diesel, treatments of diesel redex and lots of long journeys, using full rev range). If fact, my own theory is this is what gums up egr valves, providing the adhesive for the soot particles to stick to, and if you can clean this airflow up, then this will dramatically lengthen the time it takes for the egr to soot up. Just a theory, but where else can this contamination come from?

Any of your turbo hoses can fail( including the small bore vacuum hoses), but the upper large hose failed on one car after rubbing on the battery connector, and the most common bottom hose failure seems to be rubbing through on the gearbox earth strap bolt. A good tip is to remove suspect hose, put latex gloves over ends and submerge in water: bubbles show the splits!
I would only clean the maf with electrical contact cleaner/ airline; don't poke anything down there!
The best way to keep your engine clean internally is to fit water/methanol injection - steam clean as you drive!!!

Hope that helps

Cheerio
The Captain:thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How much did the hot dip cost, captain? I am assuming the whole head has to come off and cleaned rather than just clean the intake manifold or is the engine in 3 pieces: block, head and intake manifold?
 

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Hello zakzzz,

My local engineers is owned by a 156 V6 driver, so he only charged me £20 to clean it chemically, then left in his dip tank over the weekend: result! The 10 valve jtd engine is the standard block, head, manifold arrangement, but the difficult bit is tearing down the engine to the point you can remove the manifold! All belts, glow plugs, common rail, diesel pump/pulley have to come off! It's not for the faint hearted! But definitely a possible job to tackle yourself, providing you have the right tools etc. but you don't need to remove the head.

Best of luck!
Cheerio

The Captain:thumbs:
 
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