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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello. This question is just a quick one regarding my brothers 2011 Fortuner d4d that blew its turbo at 107000km.

To me it looks like something from the exhaust port destroyed the turbos blades. Carbon maybe? Or did this turbo have a bearing failure/oil starvation and the imbalance caused it to destroy itself?

We have a rebuilt turbo from Mr turbo but before we fit it we would just like to know if something more serious might have caused this to happen.
 

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The problem with destroying turbo's is with the speed and heat they work at if something does wrong.... they tend to break up so badly, it is difficult to trace the root cause.

Just a question on the pictures: You show us the broken exhaust turbine wheel and a compressor wheel . The compressor wheel is the old one? That notch is broken off or balancing machining?

The best advice I can give is to add an EGT to at least give a warning when things are starting to go wrong.
 

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i have a similar fear about the wifes Citroen C4 HDI. Apparently if the old oil is not flushed properly and new put in, the new oil is immediately contaminated and does not "last" for the duration of the service interval. this causes the contaminants to clog the filters, sieves and oil feed pipes causing oil starvation to the turbo resulting in bearing failure. Could also be causes by carbon failure. On the citroen they say it sounds like a police siren when the blades are chipped by carbon bits.

I hate using flush, but at the last service i flushed the engine, let it drain at the plug for 30 mins minimum (they dont advise the suction method and used manufacturers spec oil.

So far so good....
 

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i have a similar fear about the wifes Citroen C4 HDI. Apparently if the old oil is not flushed properly and new put in, the new oil is immediately contaminated and does not "last" for the duration of the service interval. this causes the contaminants to clog the filters, sieves and oil feed pipes causing oil starvation to the turbo resulting in bearing failure. Could also be causes by carbon failure. On the citroen they say it sounds like a police siren when the blades are chipped by carbon bits.

I hate using flush, but at the last service i flushed the engine, let it drain at the plug for 30 mins minimum (they dont advise the suction method and used manufacturers spec oil.

So far so good....
Dont stress too much. These HDI engines are really tough. Just replace your oil return and feed banjo bolts with built in filters wih the updated bolt part number 037660, they cost R100 each. Then service with good synthetic oil. My peugeot partner with the same engine is standing on 130 000km and turbo is still fresh upon last inspection on 125. Running on Shell Helix Ultra ECT 5W30
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just a question on the pictures: You show us the broken exhaust turbine wheel and a compressor wheel . The compressor wheel is the old one? That notch is broken off or balancing machining?
The compressor wheel is the old one - that notch is a machined notch and not broken.

The day the turbo started sounding like a police siren my brother was busy putting his caravan through roadworthy.
So there was a lot of stop - switch off - re-start going on that day at the test station. So my guess is then the stop and restarting caused the turbo to lose oil pressure too often and finally gave in ? Another irritating fact is that the Toyota warranty goes up to 100 000km - he's now done 107 000km. No suprises there I suppose.
 

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In my experience with the D4D, they tend to lose power just above 100000km anyway, to the point where an old 85kW Mazda B series 2.5 will outrun it easily. I always suspected there may be carbon build-up on the exhaust turbine but from the way yours looks this is not too severe at all. It could very well be that egt's went through the roof and melted the turbine impeller. What does the exhaust turbine housing look like on the inside?

Damage through contact would appear very different, and damage through a worn shaft bearing would also appear differently. I think that the turbine may have been subject to additional stress of towing the caravan and then somehow gotten damaged due to the additional heat, most probably from overheating and heat soak without idling for a few moments to cool the components before shutting down. But these are just guesses, one would need to inspect more closely to find the true culprit.

Just as a side note: One of those vanes could have broken off at speed, and taken the rest of them with it, so it may be that evidence pointing to failure may appear only on one vane, while the rest might look like they were damaged through contact.
 

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The compressor wheel is the old one - that notch is a machined notch and not broken.

The day the turbo started sounding like a police siren my brother was busy putting his caravan through roadworthy.
So there was a lot of stop - switch off - re-start going on that day at the test station. So my guess is then the stop and restarting caused the turbo to lose oil pressure too often and finally gave in ? Another irritating fact is that the Toyota warranty goes up to 100 000km - he's now done 107 000km. No suprises there I suppose.
Sounds like vw/audi 1.9 tdi storys all over again. Just after a 100k the turbo craps out of warranty.

Ofcourse tdi all over the place breaks and no one bats an eyelid but one in a thousand jtdm motors craps and everybody loses their friggin minds.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sounds like vw/audi 1.9 tdi storys all over again. Just after a 100k the turbo craps out of warranty.

Ofcourse tdi all over the place breaks and no one bats an eyelid but one in a thousand jtdm motors craps and everybody loses their friggin minds.
Funny thing is my brother is now using my mom's 147 JTD M while he's Fortuner is being repaired. 147 has done almost 140 000km and never had any turbo issues.
 

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Dont stress too much. These HDI engines are really tough. Just replace your oil return and feed banjo bolts with built in filters wih the updated bolt part number 037660, they cost R100 each. Then service with good synthetic oil. My peugeot partner with the same engine is standing on 130 000km and turbo is still fresh upon last inspection on 125. Running on Shell Helix Ultra ECT 5W30
Thanks! Puts my mind at ease...was consifering getting rid of it but its really frugal as a mums taxi. This one is on 95k kms now.
 

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My guess would be high exhaust gas temperatures causing fatigue over time.


I'd suggest he installs and EGT probe in the manifold before the turbo and monitors. You get them from aviation suppliers and the display unit can be set to sound an audible alarm at a chosen point. Normally this would be set between 720 and 750 celcius.

If he frequently tows his caravan in high gear it could lead to excessive EGT. In a diesel its generally better to change down earlier and keep the revs up(ensuring a complete burn), rather than having 100% throttle at <2000 rpm as this leads to incomplete combustion in the cylinder and spiking EGTs

Also, is chipped or similar?
 
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