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Need to do the belt on my 1.4MA 170.
Shop4Parts offer OEM or SKF.
Any thoughts? I appreciate it's difficult to comment as even the cheapest will work but does anyone have experince of failures after replacement?
Thanks.
 

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Ive had FIATS ALFAS and LANCIAS all my life and you'd be suprised how many times Ive bought a spare part from a main dealer which came in a nice Alfa/Fiat/Lancia branded box only to find inside that box another box from a company such as SKF NSK Bosch, koni etc with the part inside that. Its often worth trying to find a part from another source so you can avoid the dealer premium especially things like belts, bearings, and plugs.

As armoore said SKF are a renowned brand and can be trusted.

I think I'd avoid Ebay and Amazon though for these things just in case you get a fake chinese part, it happens. Buy from a trusted company.
 

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What's the saving of SKF over original Alfa?
 

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So if you run either cambelt kit for 4 years, you're talking about a saving of 47p per month...

I've got nothing bad to say about SKF and I use plenty of their wheel bearing kits, but I think on that basis I'd go with genuine Alfa.
 

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I got a genuine belt kit for ours and the belt was stamped with a brand that I had never heard of. I suspect Alfa supply several different makes of belt as genuine as I have had Dayco in the past.

Personally I would be happy fitting either, or go for a different one such as Contitech.
 

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SKF currently supply FCA with bearings for the Giulia . Also for ferrari F1 and rolls royce. I reckon you wouldnt go wrong if you went with them.
 

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ALFA....like most (all?) manufacturers don't make cambelts...as said above. They put a tender out to anyone who can make it to their specs....and knowing ALFA buy the cheapest!!. Buying one in an ALFA box gives you no advantages....just a bigger gap in your wallet. Just get a good brand (SKF Gates etc) and you will be fine....it might even be made by the company that made the original one.

Mine will need doing soon....been looking into belt materials (yes there are different and better types...who knew!!!?)....this might interest some.....

  • Neoprene Fiberglass Belts
  • Why use this? This is the typical material used in timing belts. It has a longer shelf time because of its UV resistant nature. Also, it has an outstanding chemical resistance as well as dimensional stability.
  • When should I use this? Since it has a great chemical resistance, neoprene fiberglass belts are ideal in corrosive environments.

  • Urethane/Polyester & Urethane/Kevlar Belts
  • Why use this? Timing belts reinforced with these components are known for its ability in shock resistance. Its reinforcement with combined materials makes it stronger and boasts with its durability and flexibility.
  • When should I use this? Its capacity in resisting shocks makes it the good choice for application involving intermittent shock loading in high level.

  • Urethane Belts
  • Why use this? Notable for its relatively low elongation rate while still possessing an impressive tensile strength, urethane or steel belts are also a sought for the material used in timing belts.
  • When should I use this? Due to its impressive dimensional stability, urethane belts can withstand harsh and extreme temperatures- be it too high or too low. However, this type of belt can’t prevent electrical charges from accumulating making it not static conductive.
 

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ALFA....like most (all?) manufacturers don't make cambelts...as said above. They put a tender out to anyone who can make it to their specs....and knowing ALFA buy the cheapest!!. Buying one in an ALFA box gives you no advantages....just a bigger gap in your wallet. Just get a good brand (SKF Gates etc) and you will be fine....it might even be made by the company that made the original one.
Agree totally. Many of the parts on the car originally will have been made by well know suppliers, but at a cost acceptable to Alfa. The replacement aftermarket belts may well actually be better than the original...

Another good example is the shock absorbers fitted when new. Mine were well goosed at 60,000 miles they are made by Sachs which have a very good reputation, and normally would last much longer than that, which suggests they are made to a reduced cost.
 

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Agree totally. Many of the parts on the car originally will have been made by well know suppliers, but at a cost acceptable to Alfa. The replacement aftermarket belts may well actually be better than the original...

Another good example is the shock absorbers fitted when new. Mine were well goosed at 60,000 miles they are made by Sachs which have a very good reputation, and normally would last much longer than that, which suggests they are made to a reduced cost.
Thats about 100K Kms? Thats perfectly acceptable for shock absorbers I think. At best, their performance will have dropped off to a point where new ones are a good idea, even if they're not shagged completely.
 

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I agree that they will have lost some performance, but normally around 160km is a more typical lifespan where a drop off is obvious.

These were completely goosed, damping effect was minimal and new dampers transformed the ride and handling. (Best £200 I have spent on the car so far)

it is just one example of cost reduction, I am sure there would be others.
 

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I agree that they will have lost some performance, but normally around 160km is a more typical lifespan where a drop off is obvious.

These were completely goosed, damping effect was minimal and new dampers transformed the ride and handling. (Best £200 I have spent on the car so far)

it is just one example of cost reduction, I am sure there would be others.
No, that’s normal for the industry in general. 100K kms is totally acceptable, and if you’re used to more that’s an anomaly or you’ve been lucky. My Megane’s KYBs were done at that mileage and my FILs Mazda 3 was on its third set at 150K kms.

Also totally depends on conditions and driving style. Vehicle weight, tyre types etc etc etc... Too many variables for much in the way of rules.
 

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I have never had shockers so worn at such low mileages before. Even on the many Alfa's I have owned.
 

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I have never had shockers so worn at such low mileages before. Even on the many Alfa's I have owned.
Did you own it from new ? If not perhaps the original owner/s weren't very mechanically sympathetic regarding speed bumps or potholes etc ;)
 

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Did you own it from new ? If not perhaps the original owner/s weren't very mechanically sympathetic regarding speed bumps or potholes etc ;)
That is possible I suppose, but from the rest of the car there was no evidence of it being driven in a Dukes of Hazzard fashion.
 

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Just out of interest Symon do you have a lot of speed bumps around where you live? I noticed you posted about your lower gearbox mounting needing attention for the second time. With the shocks being a problem too it kind of suggests you have a less than smooth road system round you. I agree 60K seems a bit too early for them to fail.
 

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When I worked seller VW/Audi the factory recommended time to change shocks was 50,000 miles. They might feel ok....but that's because they degrade very slowly over time....as soon as new ones go on you realise how knackered the old ones were!
 

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Just out of interest Symon do you have a lot of speed bumps around where you live? I noticed you posted about your lower gearbox mounting needing attention for the second time. With the shocks being a problem too it kind of suggests you have a less than smooth road system round you. I agree 60K seems a bit too early for them to fail.

Not particularly, but I don't know what the roads were like where the cars original owner lived.
My Bimmer 330ci was on it's original shocks at 120k and 15 years old and when I changed them they also felt in better condition than the ones which came off from the Alfa. The BMW ones were also Sachs.
 
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