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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Evening Gents,

I bought my car used, it only has 35k on in, but it’s now 6 years old. It does have a full service history, but I don’t have any records of the actual work completed, just the dealer stamps in the book, so I can’t ascertain or be 100% sure that the timing belt has been changed. I’m fairly mechanically proficient, and I found a step by step guide online as to how to change the belt so I think I‘m going to change it just for my own peace of mind so I know it’s been done.

I found this kit on ebay - Timing belt kit

I’m just wondering if you guys have any thoughts/experience on after market parts, or if I should stick to genuine Alfa parts. It also shows lines on the timing belt on the step by step guide to ensure correct belt position, does anyone know if those marks are on the aftermarket belts too?

Thanks so much for your input, any help greatly appreciated 👍
 

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Gates is a well respected make. Often used as O.E.
The timing marks will be present. When fitting the water pump use a small amount of gasket sealant on the mating surface and allow it to cure partially before fitting it. To keep the belt secure on the crank use a piece of stout card wedged between the belt and the raised part of the block. That way you can concentrate on the top end lining up.
 

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Alfa 159 2.0 JTDm Lusso 6sp.
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Gates are quality parts.....ALFA dont make the original parts anyway.....probably whoever tendered the most competitive price at the time.
Its a relatively easy job. Be aware that some guides don't mention and about loosening the cam shaft sprocket before tensioning the belt (and doing it up after of course!)...you cant get correct tension without this. So you will also need a tool for holding the cam sprocket whilst undoing and retorquing the bolt.....the cam holding tool is NOT suitable for this task!
Whilst doing this job I would (assuming they are the same as the 159 version....not done the G version to be honest) also be checking the ribbed belt for cracks , the crankshaft wheel that drives it (the rubber part cracks ) and, if not done before replace the ribbed belts tensioner and idler wheels.
 

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That looks like it is for the 1.9, I am not sure if the parts were the same?

I got a genuine kit from Shop4parts, I think it was around £120 including the pump.

The job itself is relatively easy, I followed the guide on the Alfaworkshop site, but I have had some experience of doing Alfa belts before.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Be aware that some guides don't mention and about loosening the cam shaft sprocket before tensioning the belt (and doing it up after of course!)...you cant get correct tension without this. So you will also need a tool for holding the cam sprocket whilst undoing and retorquing the bolt.....the cam holding tool is NOT suitable for this task!
That’s great advice, thanks. Here’s the link to the guide I found, it seems pretty straight forward? Replace Timing Belt

Is that a decent guide?

Cheers 🙏
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That looks like it is for the 1.9, I am not sure if the parts were the same?

I got a genuine kit from Shop4parts, I think it was around £120 including the pump.

The job itself is relatively easy, I followed the guide on the Alfaworkshop site, but I have had some experience of doing Alfa belts before.

That’s good because that’s the same guide I found, I’m going to check that the parts are correct before I order them, you can send them the VIN to check they’re correct.
 

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When you do the belt change, the alignment lines on the belt won't line up with the line on the fuel pump after you have rotated the engine by hand after fitting the belt.

Just in case you think you have done something wrong. :)
 

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2011 2.0L JTDM2 140 Giulietta
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Also, unless you plan to remove and refit it, moving the aux belt tensioner out of the way to remove and fit the timing belt is much easier with two people because of the lack of access.

Because I'm an idiot, I did mine between xmas and new year, strip down took about thrice as long as rebuild. It's all very tight so leverage is an issue but with the alfa worshop guide pretty easy. Just be sure to get the correct torque setting for the belt tensioner.

Might as well do an oil swap and air filter change whilst you're at it since you've got all the undertrays off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Also, unless you plan to remove and refit it, moving the aux belt tensioner out of the way to remove and fit the timing belt is much easier with two people because of the lack of access.

Because I'm an idiot, I did mine between xmas and new year, strip down took about thrice as long as rebuild. It's all very tight so leverage is an issue but with the alfa worshop guide pretty easy. Just be sure to get the correct torque setting for the belt tensioner.

Might as well do an oil swap and air filter change whilst you're at it since you've got all the undertrays off.
Thanks for the tip, I was going to replace the aux belt as well, is it a good idea to change the aux tensioner too? Are the torque settings listed on the guide or can I find them online?

Thanks again
 

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Also, unless you plan to remove and refit it, moving the aux belt tensioner out of the way to remove and fit the timing belt is much easier with two people because of the lack of access.
Out of necessity I devised a trick for that. You need one of these 15mm spanners RS PRO 5 Piece Chrome Vanadium Steel Box Wrench Set | RS Components and about 18" of 1"ID steel tube that will fit over the handle. Doesn't need to be strong, I think I used an old B&Q clothes rail tube. (These are actually really handy spanners to have on an Alfa, as the swivel head and shallow socket will fit into a very slim space).

This tube can be extended to give lots of leverage. If you put an axle stand or couple of bricks under the tubular handle extension, to keep the tensioner backed off, it's a doddle to put the aux belt back on single handed.
 
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