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Am I alone in thinking they should be banned on the grounds of health and safety? I'm there trying to concentrate on doing the important business of Government. I turn around to ask someone something and the girl who sits behind me is retrieving something out of her handbag exposing a mixture of bare flesh and bits of string and flimsy material that doesn't look up to the job.

It's distracting and could, in some cases, bring on heart and breathing difficulties.
 

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It's Sunday, go to church, sing your heart out and pray to the big man for Monday to come quicker and even greater delights.
 

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Time for some disposable 'Dettol' impregnated knickers to be brought into fashion methinks? This thread may get discarded/ or locked! :D
 

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This thread may get discarded/ or locked! :D
What for using correct English :)
And when you add in lack of washing....
http://network.nature.com/hubs/london/blog/2008/10/22/best-faecal-matter-news-story-ever

Best faecal-matter news story ever

Date: Wednesday, 22 Oct ober 2008 - 11:30 UTC



You might not want to read this one over lunch.
Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine report an alarming lack of hand washing in the UK. Taking swabs of commuters’ fingers in five major cities, they found bacterial signs of faecal contamination in a quarter of all subjects.
But then it gets bizarre. The further north samples were taken, the more poo bugs were present. In Newcastle, over half of all men had feculent fingers. Just 6% of their metrosexual counterparts in London, by contrast, had tainted talons. Women are reasonably constant in their cleanliness, with London again being the lowest.
Newcastle – men 53%, women 30%
Liverpool – men 36%, women 31%
Birmingham – men 21%, women 26%
Cardiff – men 15%, women 29%
Euston (London) – men 6%, women 21%
What’s going on here? Are people in the north really soap-dodgers? Some observations:
• Although the study was carried out by reputable scientists, it is only a preliminary report, and does not appear to have been peer reviewed nor published in a journal. So the figures may not be rigorous.
• The sample size is only 409, or roughly 46 men and 46 women in each city. Is this statistically significant?
• No mention is given in the reportage of the journey history of each participant. Local conditions in each city might predispose commuters to contamination to a greater or lesser degree than in another city. For example, someone who has caught two Metro trains and used four escalators in Newcastle before being swabbed will have been exposed to more potential contamination from fellow passengers than someone who’s just joined the bus queue in Cardiff. (However, by this argument, you’d expect London to be a bugfest.)
• Was the time of day kept constant between cities? If you swab during rush hour people are more likely to have clung to poles and straps than during off-peak times—surely a greater contaminant risk.
Still, it’s an interesting and stomach-turning piece of work. After yesterday’s atheistic bus adverts, it seems cleanliness is next to godliness in its absence from public transport.
 

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Interesting.:): I'm a 4% club member then? Plenty of hand washing in our house,AND we boil all towels and face flannels weekly! And I mean boil, in a stainless steel boiling vessel on the gas hob. Washing machines rubber door seals would rapidly fail at the temperatures we employ? :thumbs:
 

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What percentage of males would you estimate wash their hands after handling their todger in the gents?

Where there's paper towels, I've taken to using one to open the door to get out.
 

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What percentage of males would you estimate wash their hands after handling their todger in the gents?

Where there's paper towels, I've taken to using one to open the door to get out.
Just as I do... too many dirty buggers out there who think the sign that reads 'Now please wash your hands' never applies to them. :rolleyes:
 

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We have a fingerprint reader at work for clocking in and out. Because of that reason it is wise to wash your hands after using it.
 
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Just as I do... too many dirty buggers out there who think the sign that reads 'Now please wash your hands' never applies to them. :rolleyes:
AKA "The French" ;)

With their workplace ritual of shaking everyone's
hand when they get into work each morning. :thumbs:
 
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Regarding Keithyboy's OP, certainly, using the offending item as floss could be injurious to one's health, however bad the gingivitis. This should be avoided at all costs.
 

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My old employer actually banned them (although I never got on to the team of inspectors) apparently it was distracting???????????

i never had an issue with i...................
it
 

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Actually, there's a serious point to this. Good hand hygiene is a good way to reduce your risk of swine flu and other bugs - hence the hand washers in hospitals that nobody uses much either.:mad:

Going on hols this year, we took a bottle of alcohol-based handwash and used it regularly, because we were sure we were going to catch something on the way out at the plague pit that is Heathrow!
 
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