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Suited for a beginner

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Hi everyone

I have no experience with cars whatsoever but I've taken quite an interest in the mechanics of it and would like to educate myself further and gain some experience by working on a cheap second car. Recently I stumbled over this car listed for about 1.4k USD but I think I should be able to haggle it down a bit more than that.

From what I can tell clutch kits are quite affordable (source) so buying the car, the new parts and the required tools shouldn't be too expensive (<2k).

If possible I'd like to hear the opinion of experienced owners over whether or not this is suited for an absolute beginner and what tools or equipment I'd need to rent or buy.

Unfortunately I haven't been able to find a good guide for the swap so anything of the sorts would be greatly appreciated as well.

Thanks a lot!
 

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If you have got some space to do the work and some spare time it’s doable for a novice to cut their teeth on in my opinion. No real special tools required except clutch alignment tool (I don’t use one personally I do it by eye)
So king as you have a jack,axle stands and good selection of sockets and spanners you should be fine. Hardest part is getting box back in when working on the floor.

I have done a few on my own and depending on set up of the car I either slide box off and rest on subframe far enough back to get hands in or use trolley jack to take weight and lower down/lift back up.

When sliding box back to align clutch as space limited for alignment tool I use 2 small dabs of super glue between pressure plate and friction plate making sure friction sits centrally on pressure plate. Don’t go over the top though you want just enough glue to hold it but not too much that it’s difficult to break apart when operating the clutch once back together.
 

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I like a little bit of a project car. In fact that is all I seem to buy, only 4 so far, I am still quite young. Cars that have been slightly unloved for a period of time and in need of some mechanical and cosmetic work. I have jacks, axle stands, various socket sets, some air tools etc. A bit of a cost to set up. Good quality jacks and stands are a must for safety, but they are awkward to work under.

For me, I don't think I would be 'brave' enough to do a clutch. I did a lower wishbone on my 156, that was a struggle in itself. But I know how to do it better again next time.

If you are looking to make money, or at least break even the price you sell the car at is not when you make your money. You make the money at the price you buy the car at. With a project car, it can't really ever be cheap enough.

I wouldn't, even with my 'tinkering' experience. But it would not put me off the car, I might get a garage to do the clutch, while I focus on doing other things. Like fluid changes, suspension bits, missing interior or exterior trim, radiator replacement etc.
 

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I my opinion of you can get the car in the air and do belts,suspension components etc then a clutch is doable. Hardest part is manhandling it back up,it’s just nuts and bolts and a bit of lifting really. If it’s a first attempt then just take your time and be methodical
 

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If you decide to go ahead and do this - don't make the mistake so many novices do. Either drain the gearbox oil before you release the drive shafts or, in the ulikely event that you have 2 old inner CV's available, jack the car side by side and replace the shafts with the old CV's to act as seals. Better to drain and change the oil.

I've not changed a 147 clutch (yet) but I have changed a slave cylinder and done other work in that area. There's a fair amount of easy stripping to do under the bonnet (hood in your case). Disconnect the thin earth cable that leads from the battery and passes through fuse box. Disconnect the battery and remove it. Remove the fuse box top, you will see that its internals are held in place by 2 prongs at the front and a swivel joint at the back. Unhook the 2 prongs then using a flat screwdriver, gently lever one side of the swivels joints to the side and lift the internals as far as they will go. On the underside there are a number of plugs, unplug the one that stops you lifting the internals completely out of the fusebox - I think its the blue one. Unthread the thin earth that you disconnected earlier Pull the interntals to the right - you can usually jam them under some of the wiring on the inner wing.

You will then see a small plastic dome in the bottom of the fusebox - unscrew it and remove the 10mm nut that's holding the box in place. You will note that the fusebox is also held in place at the rear by some metal prongs - spray them with some WD40 then wriggle the fusebox side to side until it comes off. Next remove the top air filter box mount and 2 10mm nuts that hold the fusebox mounting in place. Then remove the 4 battery mounting bolts (1 is under the plastic tray) and lift out the battery tray. Remove the electrical connector to the MAS sensor (bolted to the airfilter box - the top turbo hose fits on to it). If you are not familiar with Alfa connectors - gently lift the yellow retainer a couple of mm to allow the connector to be unclipped in the usual way.

Last job here is to slacken the top turbo hose clamp where it fits on to the airfilter housing. Remove the top air intake pipe by loosening the hose clip on the bottom and and removing the 10mm bolt on the hood slam panel. Unclip the wiriing, prise it under and remove the intake pipe.

Next job is underneath - removing the airfilter but before you do, find a way to support the radiator as you will be removing its lower support. I used 2 G Cramps hooked over the plastic fins on the top of the radiator with the other end of the screw on the bonnet (hood) slam panel. I found that a very easy way but do not over tighten the cramps or you'll damage the radiator.

Underneath - remove the lower turbo hose. You will see 2 thin black pipes connected to a device that's bolted to the airfilter housing. The top one comes from the vacuum reservoir the other goes to the turbo actuator. On mine the top one had no clip - I carefully eased it off. The bottom one - just ease it off at the actuator end. There is an electrical connection to that device. It can be removed with the airbox in place but if you can't see how - unclip it when you lower the airbox (see below).

There are 3 torx bolts through the underside of the bumper - remove them as they will allow the bumper to move enough to remove the four 13mm bolts that hold the radiator mounting in place - using a 13mm long socket and extension. Ease the radiator mounting bar out and then ease the air filter housing out of the turbo hose if it hasn't already dropped on your head.

Don't think I've missed anything but use your head if you come across any additaional bits.

You will then have good top access to remove the gearbox - it may seem a little daunting but that lot only takes 30 - 40 mins.

I'll leave it to someone who's actually removed a gearbox to advise you of the rest but it looks like the usual type of job to me - slave cylinder, gear linkage, lower suspension joints and drive shafts.
 
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