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Discussion Starter #1
There must be lots of knowledgeable folks out there who could help me in a decision as to whether or not to go for one of these, or even another 105 variant, Junior, 1750 etc.
I currently run 3 very different but quite special classics, have just sold one and looking to replace shortly. I always buy the best I can and dont want a rusty heap of trouble (some might say so why you thinking of an Alfa then?!!).
I have, or have had, very original cars and modified in one or two cases. Here I quite like the idea of a lightly modded, but road biased car.
Any thoughts, good bad or indifferent welcomed, including where best to go, private, trade (prefer not) etc etc. Tell me how it is please! Alex
 

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There are plenty of fully restored 105s if you go for one of them you should have no problem. Look to pay anything over £17500 if you want 105 ownership this way. GTA R's are £40k plus and they are quite superb but you need to pay lots of gold for one of them.

There are still good ones below this price but they may need a little tidying both body and mechanicals.

And then there are the basket cases needing lots of dough and TLC. Unless you love getting your hands dirty and doing it yourself and spending lots of money you are better of buying one that has been restored.

Which one to get? They are all good and will give you a lot of fun.
 

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Not sure about that link above, 17K for LHD 1600 GTj is top money, but it is a nice example.

The 2000 GTV is significantly quicker than the 1600's, or even the 1750's, so if you want the performance it's worth paying the extra.

This one at the well known (and respected) Black and White Garage might be worth a look.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1974-Alfa-Romeo-2000-GTV-RHD-/331096715385?pt=Automobiles_UK&hash=item4d16e6f079

The only issue I have with the 2000 GTV and all the later GTj's, is the detailing of the outside and the Dashboard is less attractive, a 1750GTV is much nicer in that respect. The early 1600GTJ in the first link has some of the detailing of the 1750's, but not the four headlights or some of the nice interior bits. The earlier step front Cars are ideal for making GTA replica's and often get modified, if they haven't already been race/rally prepped so finding unmolested ones is getting increasingly difficult.

Which ever you go for the though, the 105 Coupe is lovely classic to own, it's fast enough to stay with modern Traffic, responds well to good driving and is mechanically very advanced for it's era. Rust is the main issue, but if you are prepared to spend a fair bit and choose wisely that shouldn't be a problem.
 

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There are usually a few fast road 105's around. I wouldn't focus entirely on 2000GTV as there are plenty of 1600's and a few 1750's fitted with 2000 engines and upgraded in other areas. If you're coming to an Alfa forum for an opinion I am afraid you're probably only going to get positive answers.

If you're looking for regular road use I'd probably say to avoid the full race cars. or race car clones. Great for a Sunday morning blast or trackday but not so good for everyday use. Don't be too put off going through trade, you'll pay more but you do usually get some sort of warranty and some comeback if car isn't what you thought.

As to where to look, you could try owners club website, standard classic car sales websites, check upcoming auctions, ebay etc. Alfaholics and classicalfa have a 'cars for sale' private ad section on their websites .
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All good info thanks guys. The Southwood car is now sold and B&W garages dont make it easy to get to see them!
Agree about asking opinions on an Alfa forum, but you never know, and difficult to ask elsewhere. Looks like you need to be up to £20k for a good car as far as I can see.
 
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I've been looking a lot at GTVs as I am currently in the market to buy one. I'm looking for a car I can keep for many years and use regularly for touring the UK and Europe. So it needs to have a blend of practicality and originality. Although I like the earlier step front cars, they are a) rarer and generally more expensive and b) more spartan inside. The later GTVs IMO have a nicer interior and are a bit more "modern" for a classic, much like Mitch says.

The "general" opinion from all my reading is that the 1750 GTV is the most "desirable" as it represents the combination of more modern aspects of the later GTVs with the nicest combination of styling and detailing. Most specialists I have spoken with prefer the 1750 engine over the 2000, but there are plenty of people that say the 2000 has a bit more torque. You will hear the 1750 engine described as "sweeter" and "free revving".

So having said all of that, I had decided to go for a 2000 GTV. Although I have a slight preference for the 1750, they are rarer and command a premium over the 2000 (especially the Mk I). I've done a lot of looking around. Good quality running cars, perhaps with previous restoration/repair work, are around the £20K mark now. Auction houses are putting GTVs in the 15 to 20K estimate range if they are reasonable.

Places like B&W have a bit of a premium on their cars but they do tend to be more original, fewer owner cars. If you are looking for originality from somewhere like that, be prepared to pay £20 to 25K.

If you want a full nut and bolt restoration done by a specialist, you will need a minimum of £40K, probably closer to £50K or even more. There are some very heavily restored or modified cars that are in the £30 to 40K range (eg this one http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C441230 ). I am in discussion with someone that has completed a repair/restoration job on a 2000 GTV and is looking for around £18K.

So here's what my conclusions are:

Running 2000 GTV in reasonable condition, with some previous repair/restoration work - £17 to £20K, be prepared to spend another £5K to £10K on modifications to suit (eg brake upgrades, handling kit etc).

Cheap GTV that needs repair/recommissioning - less than £10K for the car but expect to pay £15 to 20K for work (this is the path I am currently looking at btw).

Full nut and bolt restoration by a specialist - £40K upwards.

Anything for sale in the £10K to £15K range - approach with caution and be very sure you know what you are buying. Might be a bargain, might be an expensive money pit. Use a specialist to do an inspection if you don;t have the knowledge yourself.

All of this is assuming the work is done by specialists rather than you doing it yourself. Hope that helps. Personally I'd go for a 2000 GTV or a 1750 GTV if you can find one in your budget.

Good resources - check Car and Classic UK, Alfaholics and ClassicAlfa cars for sale sections. You'll get a good sense of what is out there.
 

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All good info thanks guys. The Southwood car is now sold and B&W garages dont make it easy to get to see them!
Agree about asking opinions on an Alfa forum, but you never know, and difficult to ask elsewhere. Looks like you need to be up to £20k for a good car as far as I can see.
wonder why b&w make it difficult for you to see a car:confused:
 
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wonder why b&w make it difficult for you to see a car:confused:
Appointment only, I guess they are more aimed at serious collectors/purchasers and want to minimize tyre kickers. But someone I know did take a potentially serious purchaser to see a car there and felt the customer service left a little to be desired.
 

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Mr Dunamis bought his white one there. I don't know what his experience was like however.
 

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I bought my spider from James at B&W, by appointment - no problem with customer service - the showroom is worth a visit by itself, I was a bit worried I'd paid over the odds for mine but now I know it inside out I am very happy with my purchase - I'm pretty sure he wouldn't sell you a pup
 

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I bought my spider from James at B&W, by appointment - no problem with customer service - the showroom is worth a visit by itself, I was a bit worried I'd paid over the odds for mine but now I know it inside out I am very happy with my purchase - I'm pretty sure he wouldn't sell you a pup
Not by any chance the blue one with a hugely documented history file and almost every trip logged?
 

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Mr Dunamis bought his white one there. I don't know what his
experience was like however.

I did indeed. He is a very genuine guy and believes in the cars he sells. You do however pay top dollar. My car was immaculately presented on ramps ready for me to give it the once over. :).
Just phone before you go and make an appointment. It is worth a visit as it's like a mini Alfa museum with immaculate Alfas all over the place.

I don't think he would sell anything dodgy he has a reputation to protect and he would not want to lose that. :)
 

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Not by any chance the blue one with a hugely documented history file and almost every trip logged?
Yep that's the one - the file (which unfortunately only starts in the 80's) makes for great reading especially the receipts from Alfa garages long gone, I've kept every receipt since I bought it so its getting pretty thick!
 

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Yep that's the one - the file (which unfortunately only starts in the 80's) makes for great reading especially the receipts from Alfa garages long gone, I've kept every receipt since I bought it so its getting pretty thick!
Good buy, I went to see it while I was considering my options, IIRC it was almost perfect.
 
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