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Can anyone offer any advice on telephone job interviews. I applied for a job and with the closing date being the 30th and it stating you would hear back within two weeks of the date, I wasn't expecting anything yet. But I had a call to say they want a half hour or so telephone interview with me tomorrow.

Should I treat this as a face to face interview?

It is for a IT Security position, so things I would like to ask are obviously

- how the department is setup, reporting structure
- what the role covers as the job description was just an overview
- hours, is it shift etc and out of hours support

My mind always goes blank with these things so I want to get some notes down beforehand, but this is the first time I have had a phone interview. I am assuming this is just to narrow things down so I am not sure how in depth to go with my questions or how in depth theirs will be. Anyhow, wish me luck. Any advice appreciated.
 

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"How much?"

&

"When do I start?"


That'll do ya :thumbs: :lol:


Good luck Adam :D
 

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in this climate i'd be asking questions about the financial stability of the organisation in question, why is the role being advertised, are they expanding or backfilling. If expanding an existing team, why? What is the motivation, do they have poor processes and need to bolster them with additional people resource or is the position due to growth of sales/customer base, extension into new markets, etc.
 

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Should I treat this as a face to face interview?
Yes. Find somewhere quiet and away from distractions to hold the call.
Have a copy of your CV and the job description to hand.
Also prepare some notes about you and why you think you would be good for the role.
Take notes during the interview, and if anything stands out, or doesn't make sense, ask about it.

Have a few questions of your own lined up - some of them may be answered during the call, so make sure you have a few extras there.
Here are a couple of ones to throw in...
What current issues do you have with your IT security? (or what is the biggest issue?)
What are your plans for upgrading X/Y/Z software? (if they mention specific software)
How many users connect remotely - from home or other offices?

A couple of other tips - speak clearly and listen. Don't talk over them, and when you are replying to them, don't leave long pauses, as they may think you've finished speaking and they'll start talking again.

Good luck!
 

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Telephone interviews are actually easier than you might think. The interviewer typically has his / her phone in conference mode with two or three other people in their room. Weirdly this gives you a slight advantage as in my experience anyway, it's harder for them to get organised at their end and decide who is talking next.

As long as you sound confident, have a few questions written down ready to ask them and don't punctuate your sentences with "ummmm" or "errrrrr" you should be fine. If there is an agency involved, interrogate them first and find out as much as possible about the job requirements. If there are gaps in your CV where you can't meet their requirements, think of a positive answer. i.e. "No I haven't done that before, but I have done ....... which is similar and I learn quickly".
 
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Yes, treat it as a face to face. At my place, any applicant has at least 3 to 4 phone interviews with existing people in the role before they get to the final deciding interview (which is onsite). They are two way things - we give the person more info about the job and the role, while we ask them about their experience. We use them to eliminate candidates who we don't think would be suitable to save the time and effort of getting them in for an onsite interview (which usually involves multiple people).

So although it probably won't get you the job, it could lose you the opportunity if you do not do well.

Lots of good advice already which I can only endorse. Be prepared, I would also suggest you ask them to spend at least the first 5-10 minutes outlining the role and responsibilities so that you are clear about what the job entails, This also allows you to build some good lines of questioning and highlight which aspects of your experience and skills are most relevant.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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WOW, once again this place proves it is much more than a car forum. Thanks everyone, some excellent advice there. Ghosty, WTFH, Phil and Nigel that is all stuff that was in my head but I had gone blank so thanks for dragging that forward.

There is a coffee shop round there corner which I am going to escape to for the duration.

:thumbs:
 

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Remember first that it is an Interview, so usual rules apply. As the Interviewer cannot see you keep smiling and talk with a smile as this raises positive tones and eliminates nasally sounds (as a test talk and then pinch your nose - if the sound is virtually the same, you are doing it right, if not practise until it is unnoticeable). More courtesy is needed than a face to face interview. DO NOT but in or interject - it is discipline that paints a very positive picture. Finally, bearing everything in mind, you then have to imagine, during the call, that it IS a face to face interview. Hope it helps and you get the job should you want it.
 
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Remember first that it is an Interview, so usual rules apply. As the Interviewer cannot see you keep smiling and talk with a smile as this raises positive tones and eliminates nasally sounds (as a test talk and then pinch your nose - if the sound is virtually the same, you are doing it right, if not practise until it is unnoticeable). More courtesy is needed than a face to face interview. DO NOT but in or interject - it is discipline that paints a very positive picture. Finally, bearing everything in mind, you then have to imagine, during the call, that it IS a face to face interview. Hope it helps and you get the job should you want it.
Thanks DD :D
 

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Bear in mind that you are selling and they are buying...

So at this stage (which I assume is for them to produce a short-list) don't
query why they are doing what they're doing... just concentrate on being
the right candidate. You can check the company out in many ways.

Just make sure you have a few positive key questions to ask them..
but they should be questions that emphasise that you are the man for
the job..

If you can find out the role of the person who's calling then that'll
help you think up the right question (don't go all technical with their
personnel guy).

Your only task is to get onto the shortlist... so don't ask all the negative stuff.

And.... The best of luck to you :thumbs:
 

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Eddie, I've loads of telephone interviews and like most folk here have said treat it as if it's a face to face interview. My one piece of advice is listen carfully to what's being said / asked it's not as easy to understand and hear a conversation correctly with out the visual aid of seeing a face.

Another tip is if you have a bad line explain that to the interviewer and ask them to call you back, I had a terrible time trying to understand a guy interviewing me from the States, in the end I asked if he could call me back and he did no problem.

Good luck mate :thumbs:
 

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Best of luck Eddie :thumbs:

I hate interviews, but strangely I tend to do really well in telephone interviews, probably because I have a face ideal for radio :lol: Some excellent advice given already so I'm not going to add anything :)
 

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WOW, once again this place proves it is much more than a car forum. Thanks everyone, some excellent advice there. Ghosty, WTFH, Phil and Nigel that is all stuff that was in my head but I had gone blank so thanks for dragging that forward.

There is a coffee shop round there corner which I am going to escape to for the duration.

:thumbs:
Adam, mate, DO NOT TRY AND DO THIS FROM A COFFEE SHOP! You have absolutely no control over the environment if you do that. People will be talking, the baristas will be trying to put milk in Americanos and people will get cross.

Go somewhere quiet where you are in control and can concentrate.
 

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Adam, mate, DO NOT TRY AND DO THIS FROM A COFFEE SHOP! You have absolutely no control over the environment if you do that. People will be talking, the baristas will be trying to put milk in Americanos and people will get cross.

Go somewhere quiet where you are in control and can concentrate.
This is good advice :thumbs:
 
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Adam, mate, DO NOT TRY AND DO THIS FROM A COFFEE SHOP! You have absolutely no control over the environment if you do that. People will be talking, the baristas will be trying to put milk in Americanos and people will get cross.

Go somewhere quiet where you are in control and can concentrate.
This is good advice :thumbs:
Hmmmm I hear you, but the only places I could get mobile signal here that were quiet are being ripped out currently. The coffee shop has a downstairs with mobile signal and most people don't use it.
 

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Hmmmm I hear you, but the only places I could get mobile signal here that were quiet are being ripped out currently. The coffee shop has a downstairs with mobile signal and most people don't use it.
Take unpaid leave and make the call at home in an environment you are comfortable in.
 

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I would really recommend making sure you are somewhere quiet, and you get there early to prepare.
As WTFH said a copy of your CV, the JD and the Person Spec in front of you.

Also, if you have a headset, I would use it. This is so you are able to take notes - I like to jot down what I've been asked and tick off the requirements of the person spec that I have covered with my answers. I also have a few 'stories' drafted, these are real life examples of the skills I have listed on my CV and those in the person spec.

Remember to be friendly, as DD said. This is so much harder over the phone than in person. Her advice is spot on. Smile whilst you're talking it makes a big difference to your tone of voice. Also, make sure you are sitting upright and feeling prepared and professional.

Oh, and Good luck!!
 
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