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I grabbed a length of wood from a local timber yard a few weeks ago to put some horizontals into a shed for fixing stuff too. Similar story there - I ordered a width and depth in inches, and then told him what length I needed in metres.
 

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In the construction industry we only use metres and millimetres. Centimetres are alien.
But as above, many sizes are direct conversions of imperial sizes, e.g. 38mm wide timber (inch-and-a-half), 102mm wide brickwork or steel (4 inches).
Imperial sizes won't disappear.
 

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Which is still the muddled British way in some areas. Miles per litre, anyone?
Not quite... But... I often confuse my brother when we run together because I track the distance in kilometers, which means I think of the pace in minutes per km, while he thinks in minutes per mile and that's a bit trickier to convert than the distance itself.
 

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In the construction industry we only use metres and millimetres. Centimetres are alien.
But as above, many sizes are direct conversions of imperial sizes, e.g. 38mm wide timber (inch-and-a-half), 102mm wide brickwork or steel (4 inches).
Imperial sizes won't disappear.
I spent many years as a temporary works designer for a civil contractor. Once the industry went fully metric my designs were in metric but invariably when the foreman rang up to ask about the timber sizes for the shutters he spoke in inches although his joiners would use metric for the actual build. The odd thing was that in metric timber sizes were always small by large, as in 50 x 100 or 75 x 225, but in imperial it would be large by small as in 4 x 2 or 9 x 3. I could look at my calculations and without hesitation read off the metric requirement and quote the imperial the correct way round.
On timber sizes I too bought a couple of lengths a few weeks ago and although it is 50 years since metrication for construction they still think of timber lengths in feet but metric feet of 300 mm. He was cursing their website which lists/prices timber by the metre, which is how I had ordered what I needed for collection, but they work in multiples of 0.3 metres.
On bricks the sizes did change. Brick sizes were based on 9" module with 3/8" joint meaning an actual brick was 8 7/8" long. A modern brick is based on 225mm module length with a 10mm joint meaning the brick is 215mm and not 219mm, similarly the width is 102mm rather than 105mm and the height 65mm rather than 67mm. Not much different but when scaled up in a wall the difference can get significant
 

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I spent many years as a temporary works designer for a civil contractor.
Was your role temporary, or were the works?

I assume the latter if it was many years. :)

Mind you, my old employer set up some 'temporary offices' in portacabins in the 80's, and they were still there until 2010. :D
 
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Was your role temporary, or were the works?

I assume the latter if it was many years. :)

Mind you, my old employer set up some 'temporary offices' in portacabins in the 80's, and they were still there until 2010. :D
It is a technical term. What the client asked to be constructed in the contract are known as the Permanent Works. Everything else that the contractor needs to build to enable him to construct the Permanent Works are known as temporary works. It can get complicated. If you install steel sheetpiles to support the soil when you dig a deep hole they are temporary works. However it might be more economic to leave them in place rather than remove them so they remain permanently in the ground but, because they were not part of what the client requires, they are actually temporary works.:whistle:
Confused?:confused::unsure:
 

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In science that’s why a half space is used instead of the comma in the following example.
2 345 and not 2,345 as the latter is seen as 2 point three four five and not two thousand three hundred and forty five. In flight briefing for radio frequencies x is often used instead of a decimal point to ensure clarity.
I once had all of my sixth formers give an answer to a homework question orders of magnitude incorrect. The reason being on the antiquated board an imperfection looked like a decimal point where it had retained some chalk. The interactive white board didn’t have the same problem.
 

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Same except we use 1/2 space if possible. 8th bullet point down.This is what I found in BS8888. Looking through it brought back memories of all the engineering drawing I did to get top grade ‘O’ level. I still have all my drawing instruments and my adjustable set square. My bedroom has genuine (copies) of Sopwith aircraft framed and on the wall. My living room has one of the 33 Stradale. All orthographic projections (1st angle) except the 33 one which is a mixture of 1st and 3rd to get it 4 views on the sheet.
Font Material property Parallel Screenshot Document
 

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Seems a measurement of "that'll do" has fallen out of favour these days 🙁. Shame it covered both metric and imperial!
 

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Don't even get me started on finding metric and imperial components 'persuaded together' by halfwits ...
Been there, done that! "Metric" was a concept our maintenance fitters just couldn't get their heads round. We had to invest in "Metric Machine" stickers to stop routine jobs becoming panic jobs.
 

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And then there's vehicle tyres.

225/40/18.
225 = mm wide, 18 = inches wheel diameter.

Who was smoking what when they thought that up?
 

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Back to being tall...

A few years ago at the doctors she was going on about general health and BMI. I was weighed and then measured for height. She looked at me and said "You know what I'm about to say don't you." I replied "Yes, I know I'm not tall enough"
 

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Mixed units of measure ... sign of a flexible mind eh?
Back in 1975 I was working on a grain silo construction project in Kings Lynn designed by Dutch consultants (the client was Dutch owned as was my employer). On the drawings the concrete structure dimensions were all in millimetres, as standard UK practise, the structural steel for the floors etc was dimensioned in centimetres while the member sizes were in millimetres but the handrailing tubes were sized in inches but rather than use fractions or a normal decimal (eg1,5) they used a superscript 5** so that it looked to our eyes as one to the power five.
Seemed a recipe for disaster but apparently it was standard Dutch practice and no one had any problems with it. On the other hand we had to take care that the fabricators were well aware of the method of dimensioning. One and half inch (38mm) diameter tube is good for a handrail but 15mm would not be so acceptable.

** this page does not appear to support superscripts as when I tried pasting in an example it copied over as 15
 
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