Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,969 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hear it all the time in public view ... it's not right is it? - surely that debases
the human race
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,758 Posts
It's horrible but it's happening. It's the tip of a very big iceberg. Many modern parents have very poor values. I've no idea what the answer to it could have been. (Note past tense.:rolleyes:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,669 Posts
Children naturally tend to mimic their parents... both verbally and in terms of general attitude & behaviour...

So surely it's down to the currently active generation to ensure that basic human standards and values are maintained and passed on to the new generations.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,037 Posts
I am with you in entirety with this one Q.

I was on a bus - there was a child about 2 years old in front of me.

Said kid let out a stream of words along the lines of:

"fer cuff, fercuff shadupp shadupp "

He was with his mother who just looked out of the window.

Sometimes I do despair.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
57,288 Posts
My lad doesn't swear in front of his kids and Jan and I don't swear in front of them either, it's wrong and sets a poor example :tut:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,280 Posts
it's one of my pet hates. i detest people who swear in front of their kids. my old business partner used to do it all the time (it's an irish thing, so he said), and it always made me cringe
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I don't have kids........don't ever want them...don't 'really' like them. However, despite this, I still believe that certain standards should be in place. A very good friend of mine has two children, a girl, aged 7, and a boy, aged 5. I'm always very consious of what I say when I'm around them, to the point that I actually find myself hearing my mate and his wife coming out with the odd word that I wouldn't ever use infront of a child. Nothing 'really' bad, but a swear word is a swear word......'bloody' (for example) is accepted on this forum, and I use it regularly, but I wouldn't want a child of mine using the word.

Many will say say that we have to move with the times, but good old fashioned standards are required to keep simple morals in check.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,037 Posts
TBH when our children (now in their 30's) were young we did on occasion let forth the odd swearword - it is part of our language and should be accepted as such.

So by the time they were 15 or so saying F*** in front of me or Liz was not a problem when said in context on rare occasions.

Now they , like us , will use it and similar words naturally, not for effect or to shock but just because - well as adults that's what we do and it transcends generations.

I still draw the line at toddlers though. (See my previous post)
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
TBH when our children (now in their 30's) were young we did on occasion let forth the odd swearword - it is part of our language and should be accepted as such.

So by the time they were 15 or so saying F*** in front of me or Liz was not a problem when said in context.

Now they , like us , will use it naturally and not for effect.

So FFS - no problem (sorry).
Having read your post I'm very sure that you posted in a similar thread before Paul. I'm not entirely in agreement with you, however, your point regarding 'context' is valid.

A year or so back, I heard my neighbour shout out to his 9 year (I guess) old child, "you can play in the garden, but mind out for the dog s***". I'd expect no less from the moron, but I was still amazed.

If he had just hit his thumb whilst hammering some nails, maybe it could be excused, but it seems it's just his mother tongue :tut:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,280 Posts
jay once had his step son josh in the office for the day. little josh would've only been about 5 at the time, and was making a bit of noise, as kids do. jay had warned him a few times to be quiet, and then blurted out 'josh shut the ****** up you wee pr**k'

i was horrified :eek:

he just passed it of as 'an irish thing' :confused:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,037 Posts
Having read your post I'm very sure that you posted in a similar thread before Paul. I'm not entirely in agreement with you, however, your point regarding 'context' is valid.

A year or so back, I heard my neighbour shout out to his 9 year (I guess) old child, "you can play in the garden, but mind out for the dog s***". I'd expect no less from the moron, but I was still amazed.

If he had just hit his thumb whilst hammering some nails, maybe it could be excused, but it seems it's just his mother tongue :tut:
Hmm - I see nothing wrong with that. I would have said "s***" as that is a perfectly acceptable term - very Chaucerian.

But then - if said child then went around thinking saying "s** * s***" was a good thing to do (funny) then I would point out the error of it's ways.

Bottom line - as I have said before - we did not demure when using "ripe" language in front of our children but were always prepared to answer their questions when they did so. They just KNEW you only used that sort of language in extremis.

Funnily enough both of my daughters will say "golly" or "gosh" in everyday language. If either of them say "F***" then you know you need to pay attention NOW.

My point? Once they reached an age of understanding (younger than you might think) I had no problem introducing a bit of Anglo Saxon vocabulary to my daughters. They understood then and now that context is all.

P.S - this does not conflict with my earlier post - people who obviously scream and shout obscenities in front of their offspring from day one and so their words (as I heard) on a bus are fercoff fercoff are a different matter entirely.
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Hmm - I see nothing wrong with that. I would have said "s***" as that is a perfectly acceptable term - very Chaucerian.

But then - if said child then went around thinking saying "s** * s***" was a good thing to do (funny) then I would point out the error of it's ways.

Bottom line - as I have said before - we did not demure when using "ripe" language in front of our children but were always prepared to answer their questions when they did so. They just KNEW you only used that sort of language in extremis.

Funnily enough both of my daughters will say "golly" or "gosh" in everyday language. If either of them say "F***" then you know you need to pay attention NOW.

My point? Once they reached an age of understanding (younger than you might think) I had no problem introducing a bit of Anglo Saxon vocabulary to my daughters. They understood then and now that context is all.
There is without doubt a great difference between adopting a slightly (dare I say) boheimien approach towards such things(I mean no malice here, afterall, what do I know about bringing up children....it's just my way of expressing), and simply using the language infront of your children because you can see nothing wrong with it. My neighbour, and far too many more, fall into the latter. This is a shame.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,037 Posts
There is without doubt a great difference between adopting a slightly (dare I say) boheimien approach towards such things(I mean no malice here, afterall, what do I know about bringing up children....it's just my way of expressing), and simply using the language infront of your children because you can see nothing wrong with it. My neighbour, and far too many more, fall into the latter. This is a shame.
I don't think we are far apart here.

I am not Bohemian but do have a realistic some might say libertarian attitude, particularly regarding language.

My approach was (is) all words are valid (dare I say in context).

Rough Anglo Saxon is there - we cannot deny it and to hide your children from it is plain daft. They (children) will hear all of it as soon as they start school.

I use bad language - always have always will.

My approach was, is (grandchildren now) just use all words as you need them but choose them well. If that means expletives then do it - but chose them well - don't waste them needlessly.

Golly - (my daughter taught me the effect of that).
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I don't think we are far apart here.

I am not Bohemian but do have a realistic some might say libertarian attitude, particularly regarding language.

My approach was (is) all words are valid (dare I say in context).

Rough Anglo Saxon is there - we cannot deny it and to hide your children from it is plain daft. They (children) will hear all of it as soon as they start school.

I use bad language - always have always will.

My approach was, is (grandchildren now) just use all words as you need them but choose them well. If that means expletives then do it - but chose them well - don't waste them needlessly.
Very fairly summised I'd say :thumbs:
 
A

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
The use of bad language around children is crass and unnecessary. They may well pick it up in the playground but they don't need to hear it from adults - who are supposed to be setting an example.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top