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Hi I’m looking too install front and rear strut braces to my 2013 G does anyone know what models actually fit as I’m struggling to locate both front and rear
Cheers .
 

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DNA Racing front strut brace fits plug and play, the rear strut brace is with the need of drilling holes.
 

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Apart from a very bendy Mk1 Golf Cabrio I had Ive NEVER noticed any difference before and after from fitting strut brace....modernish cars are just nor that bendy anymore!!! If its a track day car being pushed to the limits all the time..then you MIGHT notice it....on the road?.....nah....and to be honest you are not quite all there if you drive hard enough on the road to feel the difference......they do however look cool when you open the bonnet....which is as good a reason as any I guess!!
 

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From every review I've ever read or watched most people are seriously underwhelmed by fitting strut braces. It seems you might notice them on a track but in normal road use you'd have to be really pushing it to get any benefit and that's not really a good idea on the road is it? There's lots of lamppost's, trees and people to get in your way.

Also the idea is to stiffen up the suspension set up so the only ones worth fitting for performance reasons are the solid one piece welded ones. The type with bolts at either end will act like a pivot to negate any potential benefit you might get. But as Alfaitalia pointed out they do look good and those pivoted type look very fancy, especially the carbon ones.

Personally I have to agree with Alfaitalia and think the biggest benefit you'll get is a cool look under the bonnet rather than performance,
 

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Braces, regardless of which kind, are always there to stiffen up the chassis and hence allow a better performing suspension.
You will recognise this every time you drive the car.
Those who tried this can confirm this.

Besides, there is one rear brace where you do need to drill. It is from Orque, and very expensive, but effective.
934610
 

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Braces, regardless of which kind, are always there to stiffen up the chassis and hence allow a better performing suspension.
You will recognise this every time you drive the car.
Those who tried this can confirm this.

Besides, there is one rear brace where you do need to drill. It is from Orque, and very expensive, but effective. View attachment 934610
Apologies JnL I stand corrected ( to a point ). You're right all types will indeed stiffen up the chassis regardless of type and that Orque one is a really elegant and well thought out solution. I've never come across those before.

The thing with strut braces is that if you are fitting one then your aim is to make the chassis as stiff as it can right?. As soon as you introduce the bolt part at each end like a lot of the strut braces out there you have instantly lost a bit of that rigidity in comparison with a solid one piece design. It goes without saying that some of the forces you are trying to direct from the top of one strut across the brace over to the opposing strut will be transferred in other directions around that pivot. This is why a solid one piece brace will out perform the other types out there. I know that is going to be minimal but if you can can avoid losing any and make it as efficient as possible why wouldn't you?

A similar thing is happening with that beautiful looking Orque rear strut brace. Because its not attached directly or closely to the top of the strut then some of those forces are again being lost through flex in the body panels. It would be much better and more effective to have the brace attached to the top of the strut, but then we would certainly loose a lot of load space. Again it minimal so I guess yo have to consider what your priorities and reasons for fitting one are. The Orque version is a nice compromise of practicality over structural efficiency and they are so nice looking (I almost want one myself :D )

The other point where I was wrong and apologies for this too. You are right most people who put them on do notice a difference but not to the performance of the car, just how it feels. Its very doubtful or likely they are going to be able to corner faster because the car is now more capable of cornering faster. What it is more likely to do is allow the driver to better feel how the car is reacting and more consistently. If they are a good enough driver then they will be able to respond better to what the suspension is now telling them. So you are totally right the suspension is performing better but I guess communicating better is more accurate. ( just like I should learn how to do ;) )
 

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There might be some ( very slight) benefit at the front end where cornering forces will try and pull the struts apart and alter suspension geometry which a brace will try and counteract, although this really isn't a big problem on modern cars and unless you swap the topmounts for spherical uniball types you'll get far more flex and geometry change in the rubber bushings than through shell movement.

At the rear you'll get next to zero benefit, the suspension design means all the movement is controlled by the rear arms, you can remove the damper and the suspension will still move as intended, which means virtually no sideways force on the mounts and nothing for the brace to brace.

It might increase the feel of stiffness but it won't do anything to make the suspension work more efficiently, and will come at the expense of reducing practicality and load space.

Your money, your choice, just don't expect them to make it suddenly feel like a btcc car.
 

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The placebo effect will have a large bearing on whether someone can feel an improvement from something they've bought and fitted, would be interested to see whether someone doing a blind test would be able to feel any difference.
 

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a) This is why a solid one piece brace will out perform the other types out there.
b) It would be much better and more effective to have the brace attached to the top of the strut, but then we would certainly loose a lot of load space. Again it minimal so I guess yo have to consider what your priorities and reasons for fitting one are. The Orque version is a nice compromise of practicality over structural efficiency and they are so nice looking (I almost want one myself :D )
I totally agree with your long statement. That is exactly what I meant in a few more words :)
To a) Yes, your are correct. But sometimes it is good to have a multi-piece strut brace, like in my MiTo (see pic attached). I do not want to remove the brackets attached to the fender walls (they are only attached with self-tapping screws) every time I want to remove the engine cover, so it is quite comfortable to just remove the middle piece.
To b) This is correct also, but the higher the brace the more it helps counteracting the chassis twist during cornering...

And finally, another appetizer of my carbon Orque rear strut brace in my MiTo. It cost me a fortune, but it is an incredible beautiful and worthwile part.
934639
934641
 

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That is a very pretty looking part for sure. Even though I'm not thinking about putting a rear brace on my G I have still been out to take a look at mine to see how easily it can be done and how much it would get in the way. Im a sucker for a bit of shiny Carbon fibre. The up shoot is it actually would be fairly easy but it would totally get in the way. The amount of gain from a feedback point of view over the loss of space/convenience I don't think a rear one would be worth it. Plus looking at the way the rear struts actually sit in the turrets Harry P has it right in the fact that the rubber mounts will absorb a big part of the benefit you gain. I'm not 100% certain but I don't think the rear strut bushing are actually attached to the body like the front are. I think they sit in a cup and are pinched down with a metal plate (if any one knows the truth please correct me) This explains why you have to drill holes if you want the brace more inline and closer to the top of the struts. I found a picture of the body panel so you can see there's no mounting holes. Its double skinned by the look of things so drilling a couple of holes wouldnt be too much bother. But still keep going back to Harry P who makes a lot of sense.

The front is a different story though. You would probably notice the gain more from the front so maybe worth it because of the lack of compromise from lost space. If someone made a one piece steel front brace that didn't need extra holes drilling I think I might be tempted to take the plunge if the price was right.

Theres certainly food for thought for the OP Tobias now.
 

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A strut brace does make a nice addition to the engine bay.
Was told that a fwd drive car only needs a rear brace and a rwd needs a front brace.
Here's a photo of my mini's brace. Really only there to stop the suspension bolts mushrooming
 

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