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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I tried to put new pads on the front of my GTV this morning without success, the two bolts holding the brake calliper in place would not budge. I have an extending socket thingy which I use for wheel bolts but had no luck with it, I tried hitting my normal socket with a hammer again with no joy. I would presume these bolts were galvanised so I'm sure I'll be able to get them off somehow. I wondered about giving the car a run to heat them up a bit.

I'm not in a tearing rush to get this done now as I had a closer look at the discs and they're pretty poor on the inside so I'm going to order new ones and do the whole thing at the same time.

Does anyone have any special tips for getting the bolts off?
 

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If you are only changing the pads you dont need to remove the caliper. If you need to remove it just make sure you use a hex drive socket rather than a bi hex which could round off the bolt heads. Sometimes a release oil helps slightly.Other than that it's just a question of force. Don't try to undo them with the car on a jack, it would almost certainly fall off with the amount of effort involved.
There is a knack to undoing tight bolts best summed up by the saying "a quick jerk is better than a steady pull". In other words put all your effort into the initial pull on the bar like a weightlifter does.:)
 

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get some good penetrating fluid on there, i did my 147 discs and pads today and with a spanner plus penetrating fluid and a quick smack with a hammer on the spanner did the trick. In the end i didnt fit the pads as the fit was shocking for a pattern part so trying to source some better ones now
 

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The end of the bolt holes are open probably, so the rust is more likely to be at the end of the bolt, rather than the head. Get some penetrating lube in there from the back and allow it time to soak in. Don't get any on the discs obviously... :D

Also, when you come to get the bolts off, heat them a bit with a blow lamp and them squirt them with some Shock/Unlock (Halfords) which is pretty cold and will make the bolt contract suddenly.. The thermal shock might help break the rust stiction that is keeping it "seized".

Dooooon't re-fit the original bolts, unless they come out without damaged heads and only minimal corrosion on them. Buy new ones and put some Blue Hylomar (or silicone gasket goo) on the end of the bolt (where yours are rusty) so that they won't seize up again. They're dear.. but a tenner on new bolts is worth the grief you'll save in the future.

Ralf S.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Some good tips here. Will WD40 do the trick (as I already have it) or is there some more heavy duty penetrating oil which would be better? I've noticed Screwfix do a "No-Nonsense" one and it's pretty cheap.
For refitting the bolts would Copper Grease do instead of silicone gasket goo (again I already have it)? That's all I used to use on my Sprint and 75.
 

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WD40 will be fine, although not the best releae oil it will stop the thread getting tight as you undo it . The bolts will probably be more tight than rusty.To re assemble just use ordinary grease or lightly oil the threads if they are dry.

I would'nt recommend the use of copper grease on ordinary steel bolts. The chemical reaction between copper, steel and salty water is worse than having nothing at all on there. As it reacts over time it changes into a nasty black abrasive paste. It's only suitable on cars for exhaust manifold bolts that get very hot (it was originally made for use in foundries on moulds and dies where ordinary grease burns off. The copper prevents the threads heat siezing.
 
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