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Discussion Starter #1
I thought it might be worth starting a thread for people to share their experiences of using Snowsocks.

Firstly, a huge thank you to whoever it was who suggested that turning the wheel full lock, then back again was the easiest way to get them on when there's not alot of room between the tyre and the wheelarch. It definitely saves your knuckles.

As you would imagine I've used them quite alot over the past couple of days. I went out on Saturday morning, hardly any snow, during the hour I was in the supermarket there must have been 6" dumped, and another 6" on my journey home. I pulled into a bus stop and managed to fit my nice dry snowsocks in about 10 minutes. Drove home up and down some very steep hills with no problems at all.

Yesterday however was a completely different story. I needed to drive into London, so I kept the snowsocks on for the first 6 or 7 miles of the journey, and then at Amersham the roads were finally clear, so I took my now damp soggy snowsocks off and put them in the boot. The rest of the journey into London was more or less fine, as was the journey home until about 2 miles from home. I got to a steep hill, and there was no choice but to fit the snowsocks. I just COULD NOT get them on. Whether it was because I was tired, it was dark, the snowsocks were wet, the car was on slushy snow or the car was not on the flat, I have no idea, but I had about 10 attempts and every time I tried to drive forward slightly to get the other half on, they just came off. Eventually I found somewhere that was reasonably flat and the snow was "fresh", and managed to get them both on with only 1 failed attempt.

So, they're not ideal, but they quite definitely work.

Does anyone have any tips for the best way to fit them when you're partway through a journey?
 

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Instead of driving forwards to fit the other half, why didn't you let the car roll back?
good point but when your cold and tired the first thing to go out the window is cognitive function :lol:

I've been looking at them today after t'other half spent 13 hours on the A34 on Saturday, she said she wasn't that bothered about the actual time spent in the car as she had all the stuff to cope with that its just how badly the car reacted to being driven on snow. At one point she was driving up a incline with traction control off with full lock on and the **** end of the car at 90 degrees to the road.

She now has far more drifting experience than I do :cry:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-oxfordshire-12036908

and

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/oxford/hi/people_and_places/newsid_9302000/9302780.stm << piccies
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Instead of driving forwards to fit the other half, why didn't you let the car roll back?
I didn't fancy starting uncontrolled progress down the hill, lots of parked cars.

Having said that, it's probably a good idea, a gentle roll down the hill is less likely to displace the half fitted socks than tired and grumpy clutch control :)
 

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Used snow socks several times on Sunday during a 9 hour long journey from Folkestone to Northants - to get out of a carpark at the bottom of a slope, to get in/out of another carpark, then to get some progress on snow covered back roads when I'd had enough of 4mph on the M11. No problems getting them on/off at any time, but then I do wear gloves. You should be able to get very close to half of the sock on the wheel before moving along a bit to get the other half on, if you haven't done that then naturally it will pop off given half a chance.
 

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Yes, they have been great and I've been recommending them to anyone interested inc. our postie! :thumbs:

I'm also grateful to those that tipped me to try the full-lock approach as I too initially had trouble getting them on the 19s. I also found taking off my ring & watch helpful as the space was tight and I didn't want to scratch paintwork or damage them.

Also, I've been temporarily turning off the VDC/ASR (hold button for two secs) when initially moving off on snow and ice but leaving it on if using the snowsocks. Traction has worked fine thereafter.
 

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I didn't fancy starting uncontrolled progress down the hill, lots of parked cars.

Having said that, it's probably a good idea, a gentle roll down the hill is less likely to displace the half fitted socks than tired and grumpy clutch control :)
I only asked because of the instructional videos I've seen on fitting snowsocks, all have allowed the car to roll backwards gently to expose the other half of the wheel.

I understand the situation, though - tired, cold, dark, wet etc. With a bit of practise I'm sure you'd get used to it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I only asked because of the instructional videos I've seen on fitting snowsocks, all have allowed the car to roll backwards gently to expose the other half of the wheel.
Instructional videos, now there's a good idea. Don't think I've ever seen one, I'll get googling.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
There's A LOT more space between the tyre and the wheel arch than there is on my car. Also, they look like quite skinny tyres. My car is lowered about 20mm at the front, but I did that about 5 years ago when the idea of snow was just a vague memory.

I think the gentle roll back is key. That and finding somewhere safe to stop and fit them. The problem I found is that anywhere I considered safe was covered in thick snow, so if I drove in there I'd probably get stuck in the entrance and block it whilst fitting my snowsocks. On balance probably slightly better than getting stuck on a road and then trying to do it.
 

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There's A LOT more space between the tyre and the wheel arch than there is on my car. Also, they look like quite skinny tyres. My car is lowered about 20mm at the front, but I did that about 5 years ago when the idea of snow was just a vague memory.

I think the gentle roll back is key. That and finding somewhere safe to stop and fit them. The problem I found is that anywhere I considered safe was covered in thick snow, so if I drove in there I'd probably get stuck in the entrance and block it whilst fitting my snowsocks. On balance probably slightly better than getting stuck on a road and then trying to do it.
Same problem here...lowered 156 GTA. Tried to fit mine yesterday in the snow (more of a trial than out of necessity) and it was a right pain. Just not enough gap to really get them secured over the wheel, so when you do move back or forth to get the other half on they are likely to fall/pop off. I managed when it was dry and sunny when I first bought them, but in the snow when they are all wet, the wheels are caked in salt, your hands are rubbed raw it is a different matter. Luckily I have winter tyres on, so I did not bother in the end and managed very well indeed with just the tyres doing their stuff.

I am sure if it was a matter of life or death I would perservere and manage, but certainly 10x harder than the video suggests.......!!!!
 

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My 'Top Tip' is that most of the time you only need to fit one. If all you are doing is getting out of a car park or to the end of your street, one will do it. :)
 

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Next top tip, RUD have brought out the RUS Soft Spike - just another snow sock with wire threads running through it to improve resilience when running on tarmac (though still not recommended!). The clever bit is that they have built in extra flex to make fitting the socks much easier, even when there is very little space between the tyre and wheel arch. I haven't yet tested these socks but they are ready and waiting in the boot of my GT.

RUD - RUDmatic Soft Spike

I previously used Weissenfel's Weiss Socks - they did a fantastic job and got me home from Hampshire to Tunbridge Wells across country lanes when the M25 came to a grinding (sliding?) halt. That was a trip of about 90 miles or so because of the need to double back and find alternative routes when I came across blocked roads / hills. About 15 miles were running on tarmac with occasional light covering of snow. The rest was on fresh snow.
 

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Next top tip, RUD have brought out the RUS Soft Spike - just another snow sock with wire threads running through it to improve resilience when running on tarmac (though still not recommended!). The clever bit is that they have built in extra flex to make fitting the socks much easier, even when there is very little space between the tyre and wheel arch. I haven't yet tested these socks but they are ready and waiting in the boot of my GT.

RUD - RUDmatic Soft Spike

I previously used Weissenfel's Weiss Socks - they did a fantastic job and got me home from Hampshire to Tunbridge Wells across country lanes when the M25 came to a grinding (sliding?) halt. That was a trip of about 90 miles or so because of the need to double back and find alternative routes when I came across blocked roads / hills. About 15 miles were running on tarmac with occasional light covering of snow. The rest was on fresh snow.
Thanks for the info - an interesting alternative - and seem slightly cheaper than the AutoSock. Available here RUD Snow Chains - Snow Chain Selector & Price List if anyone's interested.
 

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Slightly off-topic, but it's always useful to keep a pack of large heavy-duty cable ties in the car. If you get stuck, tie them tightly around the wheel, through the spokes with the locking bit sitting against the tyre and you should see enough resistance to get you slowly over ice and compacted snow. They'll break off as soon as you start making any real progress but no matter, they're only cable ties. :D
 
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