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AO Detailing COTY Winner 2018
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Yes, that's the right listing, but it has the wrong picture. The standard rear discs on a 116 transaxle are solid (not vented), 250mm diameter and 10mm thick. Follow your link then click on the image with the dimensions (I've attached it to this post) and you'll see that it is indeed a solid 250mm disc.

There are some more serious discs here...:)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Rob, thank you for explaining. You are right. I was assuming wrong based on the blueprint on the add.

I know Tarox but they are over my current budget. Moreover I’m not planning to race the car and already bought some spacers and adjusted vented discs from France. So was only hoping ATE produced some additional bulk of vented SZ rear discs.
 

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AO Detailing COTY Winner 2018
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448 Posts
Rob, thank you for explaining. You are right. I was assuming wrong based on the blueprint on the add.

I know Tarox but they are over my current budget. Moreover I’m not planning to race the car and already bought some spacers and adjusted vented discs from France. So was only hoping ATE produced some additional bulk of vented SZ rear discs.
In my experience, the rear discs on a road-going transaxle 116 are actually unlikely to overheat. In fact, I run lower temperature pads (Tarox Strada, 150-350 deg.C optimal) on the rear of my car and higher temperature pads (Tarox Corsa, 200-600 deg.C optimal) on the front - to give the rears a chance of reaching optimum temperature. In racing, the battle is to keep the brakes cool enough, But on a road car it's (ironically) sometimes about getting them to run hot enough to perform really well!

Everything on a car is a compromise...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great. Thank you for sharing the knowledge. Makes lot of sense. I have never paid attention to such indicators. Actually not many ordinary manufacturers would claim these figures anyway.
 

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AO Detailing COTY Winner 2018
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Great. Thank you for sharing the knowledge. Makes lot of sense. I have never paid attention to such indicators. Actually not many ordinary manufacturers would claim these figures anyway.
That trick about choosing the right materials (and maybe different ones for front and rear brakes) was taught to me by a retired engineer from Tarox: it had never really occurred to me until then. He told me that one of the most common mistakes made by 'amateur tuners' is to assume that race-car components and strategies (e.g. very high temperature brakes, the stiffest springs and dampers, bigger camber angles, much wider tyres, maximum camshaft overlap, minimal ground clearance, open exhaust, etc) will automatically improve the performance of a road car. In fact, it's quite easy to end up with a car that's horrible to drive and almost embarrassingly useless on the road! :oops:

Sorry to be a boring engineer. I'll shut up now.

Enjoy your car!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Please go ahead. It is not boring at all. In contrary. I came to similar conclusion myself about the suspension for example. I am keen to learn more about experience of people that really gone the road and found the right balance for a road car.
 

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AO Detailing COTY Winner 2018
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I learned about optimising the suspension on my Alfetta the 'hard' way (literally).

I used to run (expensive) Bilstein Sport gas dampers, but they are just too stiff and harsh for our poor-quality British roads. I now use Koni Sport adjustable dampers, set towards the softer/more compliant end of their range. It's totally transformed the car which now rides, grips, handles and brakes better, and is quieter and more comfortable too whilst still being very well controlled. I am sure that the Bilsteins would be better than the Konis on a smooth race track, but the Konis easily outperform then on the 'real' roads near where I live...
 
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