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I'm new to Alfa ownership. how do I say Veloce? is it Veloos, or Velosee ? or maybe Velochay? I must have said it wrong, because my buddy who is Italian cracked up laughing, but would not clue me in!
 

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......too late, already answered :thumbs:
 

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Yep, MatthewB is spot on. :thumbs:
 

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it could be fun to revive this. At least for me...

I just realized I mispronounced Veloce. should be: velo-say?

How about Isuzu - E-soo-zoo? (based on my japanese)
Citroen - See-Tro-Ein? based on my french
Renault - the t should be silent according to my french education,
the l is too, only extending the o sound a bit: Reu-No

Porsche - I hate to say "Poor-sheu" but that's what I hear the Top Gear guys say.
Toyota Auris - Aw-riss or Oww-riss or Who-cares?
 

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I need help with those, I'm getting very contradicting pronunciations from UK-Canada-USA-Thailand:
Audi
Daewoo
Hyundai
Iveco
Kamaz
 

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I need help with those, I'm getting very contradicting pronunciations from UK-Canada-USA-Thailand:
Audi
Daewoo
Hyundai
Iveco
Kamaz
This is how I say them (be it right or wrong);
Ow-dee
Day-u
Hi-un-die
Eye-ve-co
Ka-maz :)lol:)

The one that I've always wondered is more the Ford Ka, is it pronouced like car or just a very crude ka?? Hard to try and type it really :lol:
 

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The one that I've always wondered is more the Ford Ka, is it pronouced like car or just a very crude ka?? Hard to try and type it really :lol:
I heard a former work colleague (who had delusions of grandeur) pronounce it as a
Ford KAY-AY

I say KA to rhyme with HA!
 

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Veloce = Vel-Ochey

Also never listen to Americans, I work with them and they brutalise words to suit their accent.

Porsche = Pore-sh, American = POR-CHURRR
Citroen = See-troin, American = Sut-rone
 

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There's the argument you should pronounce a name as it would be in the country of origin, however unless you do it from the outset you start sounding silly.

For years in the UK the maker of the Sandero and Duster models was pronounce Day-see-yah, then we started getting adverts for Dat-cha :S

Also Skoda have recently advertised as shhhhkuda.
 

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There's the argument you should pronounce a name as it would be in the country of origin, however unless you do it from the outset you start sounding silly.

For years in the UK the maker of the Sandero and Duster models was pronounce Day-see-yah, then we started getting adverts for Dat-cha :S

Also Skoda have recently advertised as shhhhkuda.
I think until fairly recently, neither skoda nor Dacia could afford telly ads so they were limited to full page ads in the Rochdale Observer. They didn't give a **** how you pronounced it as long as you bought one.

There is a carry across to football too. English commentators do my head when they attempt to pronounce players and teams as they would be in the country of origin.

For instance, pronouncing Valencia in a northern accent but saying Valenthia makes you sound like a ***. Similarly, there is a commentator (Martin Tyler?) Who pronounces Vincent Kompany as Veeensohn com-pah-knee because that's how he imagines a Belgian would say it. Why? It's stupid. They don't say Steven Gerrard in a Scouse accent or Adam Johnson with a North East twang.
 

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Ah, but would you ever say "Alfa ROME-io"? There is a point in getting someone's name right, apart from general good manners. But there's no point in being "right" if it means that nobody understands what it is you're talking about anymore.

For Vincent Kompany's first name, it's not putting on an accent to say "veenson": it's just pronouncing the man's name right. "com-pah-nee" is just fakery, though.. the "proper" pronunciation would be more like "KO'panee" - you can barely hear the "m" - but the English version is close enough for it not to be rude to call him "KOMpany".

saying Valenthia makes you sound like a ***
... and a wrong one, too. "Balenthia" is the Spanish-language pronunciation. My pet peeve is people saying "Barthelona" for Barcelona - the name is Catalan, so is pronounced exactly as it would be in English.


On the original quesiton...

Daewoo - dey-woo (대우)
Hyundai - hyun-dey (현대)

[ You can learn how to pronounce Hangul intelligibly after only a day or two of study. You still won't know what the hell you're saying, but the Korean person you're reading aloud to probably will. The writing system is the most logical and straightforward of any on earth (my brother used to date a Korean girl - he got good enough at reading Korean to recognise dishes on menus and so on, but couldn't speak the language at all, really...) ]

Audi - OW-dee
Porsche - PORE-shuh
IVECO - ih-VEH-co (It's actually from English: "Industrial Vehicle Corporation")
KAMAZ - Kamaz (Камаз)
Isuzu - Ih-su-zu (い す ず)
 

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I think until fairly recently, neither skoda nor Dacia could afford telly ads so they were limited to full page ads in the Rochdale Observer. They didn't give a **** how you pronounced it as long as you bought one.

There is a carry across to football too. English commentators do my head when they attempt to pronounce players and teams as they would be in the country of origin.

For instance, pronouncing Valencia in a northern accent but saying Valenthia makes you sound like a ***. Similarly, there is a commentator (Martin Tyler?) Who pronounces Vincent Kompany as Veeensohn com-pah-knee because that's how he imagines a Belgian would say it. Why? It's stupid. They don't say Steven Gerrard in a Scouse accent or Adam Johnson with a North East twang.
It's a bit of minefield, isn't it? I guess it depends if there's local language equivalent. There's no UK language version of Veloce or Lusso unless you translate them, so you're possible stuck with pronunciations that seem at odds with the spelling ('c' being a 'ch' in Italian, and 'Ch' often being a 'c'); that said - sorry Keithyboy! :) - I sort of get the more flowery Veeensohn com-pah-knee over a drier Vincent Kompany. But I struggle with saying Porscha over Porsche.

I don't think there's a hard and fast rule here. Go with what works. We'll still know what's being discussed :)
 

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Veloce = Vel-Ochey

Also never listen to Americans, I work with them and they brutalise words to suit their accent.

Porsche = Pore-sh, American = POR-CHURRR
Citroen = See-troin, American = Sut-rone
:p
Vehicle = VEE-HICKLE

Americans are wrong on many things but what about...

Jaguar = Jag-war

The origin of the word (the animal) may have been initially close to "Jawar", with no u, giving justice to the US pronunciation.
(braces for flame war)

Thanks for all the useful info here. SHAKES-PEER would be proud. I'll share what is the Thai pronunciations are:

Mercedes = tldr; BENZ
BMW = BEE-EM
Ford Focus = FOT FO-CUT
Bentley = BEN-LAY
Chevrolet = Chevro-lett'
Jeep = YEEP
HYUNDAI = UND-AYE
KIA = KEE-AH
Lexus = LEX-UT / LEX-OUS
Lotus = LOTOT
Peugeot = PEU-YO
SAAB = ???
SMART = SEU-MAT

new inquiry:
Lexus = LEX-UT / LEX-OUS
DAF = Daft ? (bold choice!)
MAN = Man / 'M'A'N'
Seat = Fiat with a s?

PS: I get the irony of this thread, given the title contains " pronounciation " (sic)
 

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Thai does strange things to a terminal S, doesn't it?

Lexus, "LEX-us" always with "-ss" (Japanese speakers struggle with the initial "L" sound, which makes it an odd choice for a Japanese brandname)

DAF, "Daf" as in "daft"

MAN, "Man" (never heard "M.A.N.", even from Germans)

SEAT, "SAY-at", which is also the Spanish prononciation.


Also, "CHEV-ruh-lay" is the American pronunciation

Peugeot is one of those that English people have mangled into "PURR-jo". "PEW-jo" is what most others call it; the French pronunciation is more like "p'ZHO"


Vehicle = VEE-HICKLE
One variant Irish prononciation is "VEH-hickle". This is quite common in County Tipperary, which is also where Ireland's national police training college is based. As a result, the word has become the Irish equivalent of the English "'ello 'ello 'ello" when imitating a police officer (or Garda to use the correct title)...
 

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SEAT, "SAY-at", which is also the Spanish prononciation.
Agree. Often wondered about Seat Leon.

Le-on or laay-on. Latter seems right to my ears.
 

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