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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Alfisti

I've stumbled upon this mkII 1750 GTV that needs restoration. It will be a looooong process but I would like to share it here hoping to receive some good advice along the way and also that others may learn something as well.

I believe it's quite a unique car: Original colour was Lancia Arancio (paint code 558) with a cream/beige interior (judging from the original rubber mats in the boot). Very 70's! It still has it's original engine proven by the Rosslyn manufacturing plate in the engine bay.

Here are some pics of the car now as well as what I'm hoping it may look like (courtesy of google) when the project is finished. However, I've not made my mind up about the colour combination at all yet. Also keen on going with alot of alfaholics goodies...
 

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That does not look too bad, my GTV ia a lot more crispy...
Love the orange, go back to that if you are going to restore
 

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Congratulations doc on this rare acquisition! Finding a Giulia Sprint or 105 GTV (or any 105 for that matter) for reasonable money that is worthy of restoration is becoming increasingly difficult. Fear not the little bit of rust you have found - albeit, only so far. It all very repairable. Take your time to strip it carefully and have the body repaired properly - and in original colour - especially for a proper matching numbers car. Harry at Panelcor in Ottery is very good - as is his pricing. Investing in a good body repair job will be worth every cent. It is also the hardest thing to get right or fix later. The rest of the car is fairly idiot-proof and almost every part is available new (OE suppliers) or new manufactured parts and depends only on your patience for saving and/or the depth of your pockets. It also has the virtue of being the one Alfa model that is still 'accessible' and surprisingly, appreciates in value with the money spent of the right stuff (rare music to an Alfisti ears). I saw a series I 1750 in original condition recently that was complete but would require as much exterior and interior work that changed hands for R180k and a race GTV with a wave in every panel that sold for R250k! Both were local sales to local buyers. Mad money! Have fun:thumbu p::thumbu p:
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
..Love the orange, go back to that if you are going to restore
Yes, I must say, the orange is beginning to grow on me. I may go with a black interior though, instead of the cream.

I'm also considering going with an Alfaholics fast road suspension set-up and then fibreglass doors, bonnet, spare wheel well and boot lid (they need welding/replacing anyway) as well as lightweight windows and wheels. If the budget allows of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Congratulations doc on this rare acquisition! Finding a Giulia Sprint or 105 GTV (or any 105 for that matter) for reasonable money that is worthy of restoration is becoming increasingly difficult. Fear not the little bit of rust you have found - albeit, only so far. It all very repairable. Take your time to strip it carefully and have the body repaired properly - and in original colour - especially for a proper matching numbers car. Harry at Panelcor in Ottery is very good - as is his pricing. Investing in a good body repair job will be worth every cent. It is also the hardest thing to get right or fix later. The rest of the car is fairly idiot-proof and almost every part is available new (OE suppliers) or new manufactured parts and depends only on your patience for saving and/or the depth of your pockets. It also has the virtue of being the one Alfa model that is still 'accessible' and surprisingly, appreciates in value with the money spent of the right stuff (rare music to an Alfisti ears). I saw a series I 1750 in original condition recently that was complete but would require as much exterior and interior work that changed hands for R180k and a race GTV with a wave in every panel that sold for R250k! Both were local sales to local buyers. Mad money! Have fun:thumbu p::thumbu p:
Thank you juniorgtar. On the one hand I would like to think about going as original as possible, but I'm leaning more towards improving the car somewhat because I want to drive it as often as possible. It looks like one can find really excellent quality fibreglass body parts. I'm sure someone like Harry can do a really excellent job so that one will never be able to see what is steel and what is fibreglass on the car. I'll keep the original parts of course if someone ever wanted to revert back to a stock car.
 

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Thank you juniorgtar. On the one hand I would like to think about going as original as possible, but I'm leaning more towards improving the car somewhat because I want to drive it as often as possible. It looks like one can find really excellent quality fibreglass body parts. I'm sure someone like Harry can do a really excellent job so that one will never be able to see what is steel and what is fibreglass on the car. I'll keep the original parts of course if someone ever wanted to revert back to a stock car.
Fibreglass might be difficult to sell and don't have the lifespan of steel panels. I am not so keen on "improving" these cars because if it is done wrong, you will have a car that will be far inferior to a standard car. People do not generally realize how good these cars are in standard form. They are extremely usable classics. Bigger rims, wide low profile tires and some suspension mods will just take away the joy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
...I am not so keen on "improving" these cars because if it is done wrong, you will have a car that will be far inferior to a standard car. People do not generally realize how good these cars are in standard form. They are extremely usable classics. Bigger rims, wide low profile tires and some suspension mods will just take away the joy.
Point taken Alfa Klassik. To say I will improve the car is probably a bit grandiose. I suppose I just want a more fun car that I won't be sorry to drive and enjoy. We're also busy with a '66 GTV restoration that will be as close to original as possible and hopefully done to a concourse standard. That car will probably only go out on Sundays for a drive and go on the odd tour or attend a car show now and again. I'd love to try some modern bits and try to make one of these cars even lighter and sportier with the help of experts.
 

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I share Alfaklassik's skepticism about the benefit of fibreglass parts. Unless you are wanting a race car or GTAm replica there is little advantage in having say, f/glass wings because the steel ones are also part of the GT's structural integrity. Also not much is gained by f/glass bonnet and bootlids apart from the anti- tin worm effect but these will definitely detract from the vehicles value. Lastly, the GT's are light cars to begin with at -+900kgs so the small advantage of using f/glass is really only race car applicable. However, I do believe that the fast road suspension kits (Alfaholics & Classic Alfa) do materially improve the cars for two reasons: 1. These cars suspension components, springs and bushes, tend to be as old as the vehicle's age (40 plus) years, and replacing these with new standard ones (again from Alfaholics & Classic Alfa) to achieve an 'as new' suspension is only marginally cheaper than the fast road kits (which includes the front ARB and proper shocks) 2. The fast road kit does improves the cars handling in ways one can feel which enhances the joy of driving them.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
..I'd love to know where you found your new rims..
Unfortunately they are the original steel wheels from my other car (made wider by the previous owner). Wish I did have another set. I just needed to see how they looked on a gtv with the higher rear arches. They've been media blasted and then painted in opulescent silver.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I share Alfaklassik's skepticism about the benefit of fibreglass parts.... The fast road kit does improves the cars handling in ways one can feel which enhances the joy of driving them.
It turns out that the fibreglass panels are actually quite expensive. I'm not sure how much weight one needs to save anyway before really feeling a difference. For road use only I suppose you are probably right: I may just go with new steel door skins, new sills and repairs on bonnet and boot in the end. I'd be better off spending my money on a suspension kit.
Does anyone have experience of how the kit from Alfaholics compare with the one from Classic Alfa?
 

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I cannot offer a comparison because I have only used the Classic Alfa kit with Koni adjustable shocks. Handling was a massively improved compared to the tired old parts. But note that I changed everything - every bush - front and rear and, all front ball joints, and the rear light weight trailing arms. So it's probably not accurate to attribute the improvement only to the fast road kit. I did note that the (spring length dictated) ride height of the fast road kit was very low with a bias towards a lower rear end. So the car was very low which looks good but proved impractical given the low sump. So I ended up using Ali front spring pan shims and a single thick Ali upper shim at the rear to raise the ride height and give the car a flatter rather than rear biased stance. This worked for me. It's not too stiff and really works on track with very little roll. I deleted the rear ARB as is common practice and the OE one is the thickness of a hairpin anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
....I have only used the Classic Alfa kit with Koni adjustable shocks. Handling was a massively improved compared to the tired old parts. But note that I changed everything - every bush - ....the car was very low which looks good but proved impractical given the low sump...
Thank you very much juniorgtar.
I'm wondering if the Classic Alfa kit is perhaps closer to the kit C from Alfaholics. Perhaps kit B from Alfaholics won't be too low.
Did you use many polyurethane bushes rather than the original rose type?
Also, do you have adjustable top suspension arms?
 

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I believe both companies offer an uprated bush kit that provides poly bushes only where they deem it a valid upgrade and normal rubber ones for the rest.

It's also worth contacting which ever supplier you choose to ask their opinion on what you're planning to buy. Often they don't recommend certain of their suspension components in isolation (for eg the GTA quick steering arms aren't recommended unless you have rose jointed certain bits). But if you're just going for a kit B/C and some bushes you're safe of course.

I'm at a very similar point with my 2000 GTV. Have it up and running and have been driving it for a few weeks now. Had it not been for the recent UK bank holiday I would have got my bits (uprated rubber kit and a few other odds and ends) while I was over there.
 

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I believe both companies offer an uprated bush kit that provides poly bushes only where they deem it a valid upgrade and normal rubber ones for the rest.

It's also worth contacting which ever supplier you choose to ask their opinion on what you're planning to buy...
Thank you DriveRSA. Good to know that I can rely on their expertise. I'll most likely go with the equivalent of the kit B with whatever else they recommend that compliments it. I'd love to be able to take her to the track on the odd occassion, so to be able to do some fairly basic adjustments easily, would be great.
 

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I'll most likely go with the equivalent of the kit B with whatever else they recommend that compliments it. I'd love to be able to take her to the track on the odd occassion, so to be able to do some fairly basic adjustments easily, would be great.
My plan exactly...
 

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Thank you very much juniorgtar.
I'm wondering if the Classic Alfa kit is perhaps closer to the kit C from Alfaholics. Perhaps kit B from Alfaholics won't be too low.
Did you use many polyurethane bushes rather than the original rose type?
Also, do you have adjustable top suspension arms?
Hi Doc - Polyurethane bushes for all the rubber bushing (including metal encased rubber bushings), incl trailing arms bushes, Trunion arm bushes and diff hanger bush, front thicker ARB and bushes (creaks a bit unfortunately) and original OE lemforder bushes for the lower control arms. Front castor arm, adjustable camber arm and steering tie rods have unrated ball joints, but not rose joints - the latter IMRO are not practical on a road car and keeping road grime out of them can only be done with proper boots which neither Alfaholics or Classic Alfa offered at the time. New travel straps over the rear diff also help with outside wheel lift (old ones are mostly rotten) and I fitted their custom panhard rod (right side rear) to control lateral movement of the differential (a known trait with the 105's when combined with tired rear suspension). The simple panhard rod is cheaper and much easier to fit than the outright superior solution which is the Alfetta type Watts linkage that pivots on an adapter fitted to the rear casing of the diff (which is also available). I also made these changes so I could occasionally track my Junior and run it permanently on semi slicks (which quickly shows up a suspension not up to hard driving but can be like driving on crayons when they are cold).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi Doc - Polyurethane bushes for all the rubber bushing (including metal encased rubber bushings), incl trailing arms bushes, Trunion arm bushes and diff hanger bush, front thicker ARB and bushes (creaks a bit unfortunately) and original OE lemforder bushes for the lower control arms. Front castor arm, adjustable camber arm and steering tie rods have unrated ball joints, but not rose joints - the latter IMRO are not practical on a road car and keeping road grime out of them can only be done with proper boots which neither Alfaholics or Classic Alfa offered at the time. New travel straps over the rear diff also help with outside wheel lift (old ones are mostly rotten) and I fitted their custom panhard rod (right side rear) to control lateral movement of the differential (a known trait with the 105's when combined with tired rear suspension). The simple panhard rod is cheaper and much easier to fit than the outright superior solution which is the Alfetta type Watts linkage that pivots on an adapter fitted to the rear casing of the diff (which is also available). I also made these changes so I could occasionally track my Junior and run it permanently on semi slicks (which quickly shows up a suspension not up to hard driving but can be like driving on crayons when they are cold).
Thanks juniorgtar, great info. I had to read that a few times but I think I got it now.
 
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