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Well i've reached the grand old age of 42:cry: and i think the last car i serviced myself was a 3 litre capri about 20 years ago so i think it's about time i do it again.
Right, 1st of all where's the best place to source parts?
Is there a how to do guide for numpties like me?
Any tipsto make it go smooth?
Generally looking at the car i think once on axle stands the undertray needs taking off and the oil filter and sump plug are under there andi think you might take air filter from the bottom as well.
The only thing that looks scary is the fuel filter.....
any imput or encouragment greatly appreciated.
:)
 
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Theres' your first issue though - the axle stands - modern day cars don't have any where where you can put them and there isn't a support fixing either at the engine or boot end either as the manufacturer designs them to be lift on the workshop arms.
The fuel filter is easy in the 147 anyway and most parts oh they service is just checks. The air filter is a pain as you need to work underneath to get this out.
Parts - well I go to the main dealer for mine.

Oh also bear in mind too that if you have a 147/GT you will need to get the service counter reset by an independant or main dealer.

EDIT: just realised you have a 156 so I beleive you can reset this yourself:).
 

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Oil and filter is easy, to save on removing the plastic undertray everytime i just made a 50mm hole in line with the sump plug and then removed a section of undertray large enough to reach in to remove the oil filter.
I then refixed the cutout panel using 4x screws.
The newly formed access panel has a strip of 20x4mm aluminum bearers bonded on 2 sides to form a lip for
reattaching to the undertray.
So next oil change the undertray can stay in situ,it now takes about 20 minutes to perform oil and filter change I'm also 40 definately not too old just yet..
 

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never done the fuel filter on my jtd but its at the back on the bulkhead and looks nice and easily accessible, just remember it'll be full of fuel you don't want to slosh everywhere.

also being a derv you will want to turn the key on and off several times to bleed the system back up before you atempt to crank it over.

rest is straight forward.

not sure what on earth the other guy is on about with the airfilter, the airbox can only be access from the top, its exactly the same airbox for all the 156 engines. you need to have in mind though that the screws on top of the airbox often go soft so should be replaced at the same time as the service.

they can be very difficult to get into if you get rusty screws so have this in mind when atempting access, be careful not to snap or break any of the what will now be rather brittle plastic of the airbox, unfiltered air getting in will cause issues.

honestly can't tell you where the oil filter is on these, I can tell you on a twinny or a V6 but never looked on a jtd lol can't be hard to spot though you see to have that covered.

as for the axle stands talk going on, not sure what all that is about no jacking points ******. take a look in the owners manual if you are unsure of jacking points. if you look under the car, just behind the front wheel on the floor pan you will find a nice square lump of metal with a circle cut out of it, can't miss it. put your axle stands on that.
 
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Strange as mine can only be accessed from the bottom as the clip is at the bottom! Without undoing the clip how the devil are you going to get to it?
As for the jacking points - the owners manual refers to the jacking up of the car using the SISSOR JACK thats supplied with the car. You should'nt use axle stands where the sissor jacks are suppose to go as you will bend the sill - thats why sissor jacks have the hollow section in the middle to hook into and axle stands don't!
The oil filter is up next to the exhaust manifold/heatshield - there is a aluminium cover that you unbolt with a 10mm socket and a 13mm socket. This then reveals the oil filter.
No need to be so ratty about what I have written mate - I prefer to do things correct when I work on my car;)

:)

never done the fuel filter on my jtd but its at the back on the bulkhead and looks nice and easily accessible, just remember it'll be full of fuel you don't want to slosh everywhere.

also being a derv you will want to turn the key on and off several times to bleed the system back up before you atempt to crank it over.

rest is straight forward.

not sure what on earth the other guy is on about with the airfilter, the airbox can only be access from the top, its exactly the same airbox for all the 156 engines. you need to have in mind though that the screws on top of the airbox often go soft so should be replaced at the same time as the service.

they can be very difficult to get into if you get rusty screws so have this in mind when atempting access, be careful not to snap or break any of the what will now be rather brittle plastic of the airbox, unfiltered air getting in will cause issues.

honestly can't tell you where the oil filter is on these, I can tell you on a twinny or a V6 but never looked on a jtd lol can't be hard to spot though you see to have that covered.

as for the axle stands talk going on, not sure what all that is about no jacking points ******. take a look in the owners manual if you are unsure of jacking points. if you look under the car, just behind the front wheel on the floor pan you will find a nice square lump of metal with a circle cut out of it, can't miss it. put your axle stands on that.
 

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Theres' your first issue though - the axle stands - modern day cars don't have any where where you can put them and there isn't a support fixing either at the engine or boot end either as the manufacturer designs them to be lift on the workshop arms.
I place mine under the subframe at the back where it's highest. Always worked for me and I've done quite a few suspension arm replacements. Trolley jack under the round jacking point just behind the subframe under the front of the floor pan not the silly scissor jack points.
 
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I place mine under the subframe at the back where it's highest. Always worked for me and I've done quite a few suspension arm replacements. Trolley jack under the round jacking point just behind the subframe under the front of the floor pan not the silly scissor jack points.
Now there's a man talking sense with a more sensible post;). I'll have a look around for these points myself - thanks gazza!:).

:D
 
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Oil and filter is easy, to save on removing the plastic undertray everytime i just made a 50mm hole in line with the sump plug and then removed a section of undertray large enough to reach in to remove the oil filter.
I then refixed the cutout panel using 4x screws.
The newly formed access panel has a strip of 20x4mm aluminum bearers bonded on 2 sides to form a lip for
reattaching to the undertray.
So next oil change the undertray can stay in situ,it now takes about 20 minutes to perform oil and filter change I'm also 40 definately not too old just yet..
Nice idea - I like it:).

Only thing is though what do you do with the residue oil that comes *issing out? That must drip all onto the top of the undertray does it not?
 

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I'm with you Alfa 147, mine comes out from underneath as well. I dont think the other bloke realised the diesel engine is different from the petrol ones. LOL
 
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