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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was in costco the other day and noticed that they sell tyres, so I went to have a look ... as part of there "advertising" they were saying they use Nitrogen (I think) to fill the tyres, which apparent gives better fuel economy, better performance and better tyre wear ... tbh sounded like one of those ebay +20bhp for £10 ... so what's it all about then??? because it sounds like borrocks to me ....
 

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i beleive nitrogen has been used for years on race tracks with proved increases in tyre wear, economy etc.

i have never known anyone to use it though so dont know if the difference is noticeable on the road
 

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The problem with air is that it contains water vapour, It also expands inconsistently.

Nitrogen is dry and expands uniformly.

It also has other benefits too. Many of the gases that make up air have molecules small enough to pass through the rubber, but nitrogen molecules are larger so your tyres will not loose pressure so quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ok so it looks worthwhile ... so why is it that costco are the only place I've seen advertise it???
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
actually hold on ... air is 78% nitrogen so would the 22% extra nitrogen actually make much difference for road use where we run at slightly lower tyre temperatures than F1 cars!!!????
 

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I don't think it will make a lot of difference on a road car either. ;)
 

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Stick to what you know Chris!
 

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The problem with air is that it contains water vapour, It also expands inconsistently.

Nitrogen is dry and expands uniformly.

It also has other benefits too. Many of the gases that make up air have molecules small enough to pass through the rubber, but nitrogen molecules are larger so your tyres will not loose pressure so quickly.
Ok - so as air is mainly nitrogen pump your tyres up up to 40 psi or so and all those nasty "air" molecules will make their own exit through the rubber and you will be left with a tyre at 30psi filled with pure luvverly nitrogen after a week or two?
 
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Can you imagine spending your saturday morning in a queue at the tyre depot to get your tyre pressures checked and topped up with nitrogen. Whatever next, it's just more BS to get money out of us.
Sometimes when they recover WW2 aircraft wheels from crash sites the tyres are still inflated, not much seepage there then:rolleyes:
 

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My tyre place filled my 33's new tyres up with nitrogen, going on about improved fuel economy, quieter smoother ride etc.
In a 33?:cheese:
No mere gas is a match for my car's gas-guzzling, rattly crashy-riding ways. Maybe on other vehicles where the tyre gas is the only variable being changed (I was also swapping shocks, getting a wheel alignment and replacing the coolant thermostat around this time), the difference may be noticeable.
 

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I had a full set of michelins put on my last car (rx8) at costco filled with nitrogen.....honestly couldn't say it felt any different....oh apart from the fact i could now keep it on the tarmac in the wet...alot better..:lol:
 

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What AF said.:): Old aircraft tyres on a new mobile home we bought years ago were, still rock hard after a quarter of a century, so as AF said, not much seepage there?

Lazy B*****s, should check their tyres frequently, then they would get a better idea?:D Apart fom the initial electricity, my 50 litre compressor gives me a supply of air on tap, for yonks.:): Not if I use the Binks Bullows Barracuda, DA sander, air chisel,impact wrench, blow gun and so on?:D:lol: 'Q's forming shortly, for Benzine will be bad enough, thanks!:D
 
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Provided you don't have any leaks the majority of pressure loss comes from reduction in the ambient temperature, so as summer (ha ha) gives way to Autumn now is a good time to check and top up the tyres..even though we all check them weekly anyway...don't we..(herumph).

I've just bought a foot pump complete with gauge for £1.79. It not for tyres though, its for checking the pressure vessels in combi boilers when I'm doing servicing.

AlfaLincs
 

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Well done AL.:): Those BG fitters never seem to have a pump on board, but I made a long lead extended one up, which I flourish in front of them, saying," Can we check the expansion vessel pressure then mate"?

Could do it myself I guess, after your suggestions of two seasons past, AL, but the water pressure off/drain valve tends to leak after pressure release, so let them do it, with my improvised pump, then it's down to them.:D It's what they are paid for, but I've only ever seen one fitter stand to, with a footpump on board?:rolleyes:
 

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actually hold on ... air is 78% nitrogen so would the 22% extra nitrogen actually make much difference for road use where we run at slightly lower tyre temperatures than F1 cars!!!????
You can't compare F1 tyres with those round black things we use. Apart from working at far higher temperatures, they also use much lower pressures, typically around 1 bar. One factor in that disgraceful FIA/McLaren/Ferrari 'spying' farce last year centered on the gas that the red cars pump up their tyres with. I forget what it was, but it was much more exotic than nitrogen. Ferrari is one of the more common names in Italy, it translates more or less as 'Smith', which removes some of the cachet don't you think?
 
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Well done AL.:): could do it myself I guess, after your suggestions of two seasons past, AL, but the water pressure off/drain valve tends to leak after pressure release, so let them do it, with my improvised pump, then it's down to them.?:rolleyes:
ZF..we try to avoid using the Pressure Relief Valve to release pressure for precisely the reason you mention. Use a hose and drain **** elsewhere..under a radiator for example. Also to be fair to BG checking the pressure vessel is not done every service. We do it where there is a history of loss of pressure with no obvious leak. If no loss of pressure we work on the 'if it ain't broke' principle.

Its a bit of a joke really as when you go on courses at boiler companies they say "use the Pressure Relief Valve..a bit of water through it will clear any grit stuck in it".......No it doesn't.:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

AlfaLincs
 

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Cheers AL. Once more your advice is really appreciated, before the colder weather starts. I'll do that which you say, and release the pressure by bleeding elsewhere, leaving that spring loaded pressure release tap alone, which always seems to leak, after use, as you say.:):
 
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