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Had a puncher yeasterday which was a pannel nail around 10mm in from the Tyre wall. Funnliy it was in Alfa on Friday, maybe I picked it up from there?

I had a new Pirelli P-Zero fitted..£250:wow: thanks god its a company car. I would never in a million years pay that for a tyre.
Plus thing is this tyre has a thicker wall so there is a 5mm step from the wheel rim out to the tyre wall. This means I will be able to Kerb this wheel with no issues :)
 

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My P-Zero was £185 from Kwikfit.
Unfortunately, my car is on a company car allowance and because i max'd out my QV on this allowance, all other costs (insurance, servicing, tyres etc) are out of my pocket :(
Mine too was a small nail about 2mm dia, 10mm long and 10mm in from the tyre wall.
Oh well, i can't take it with me :)
 

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Well I bought mine (second hand) only to find it had a bit of a mish mash on: on the offside it had the original rear P7 that looked like new, offside front looked like the original P7 and in need of replacement, nearside front a Dunlop SP Sport Maxx in need of replacement but also incorrect load index and incorrect speed rating and on the nearside rear a relatively new Pirelli P6000 again with the wrong speed rating. This was a big disappointment, so in view of the P7's costing £125 each (and getting 3), I decided to reshod the whole car with some Kumho Ecsta HM's (and save myself £100). First thoughts are it feels a little firmer, no noisier, grips well, but this is still in the first 100 miles. We'll see how we get on.
 

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Shouldn't you always have the same type of tyres per axle? I once had a (non repairable) puncture and I had to have both tyres replaced.
 

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Shouldn't you always have the same type of tyres per axle?
:thumbs:

In the "old days" if you had a single puncture you would put spare on with good tyre and change puncture to something else as new spare. Space savers not helpful for that!

You don't want different treads on the same axle, and if you only have 2 that match make it the front two.

Best to change them as a 4 if you can for this reason (Move fronts to back halfway through life of set)
 

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I was advised to keep the best tread on the rear as it is easier to control oversteer caused by worn front tyres than understeer caused by worn rears on a front wheel drive car.
It sounds feasible but not 100% sure if is ideal though.
 

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I was advised to keep the best tread on the rear as it is easier to control oversteer caused by worn front tyres than understeer caused by worn rears on a front wheel drive car.
It sounds feasible but not 100% sure if is ideal though.
I was always told that you put new tyres on per axle, and always to keep the newest (grippiest) on the driven axle. This is especially the case for FWD cars, as the front tyres are doing twice the work: they handle steering and propulsion.

I hope you're not counting on oversteer by putting worn tyres on your front axle on a FWD because it is the recipe for massive understeer: you have the heavy engine in the front over the driven axle, so centrifugal forces will be pulling the front of the car to the outside of the bend, with worn tyres you will have noting to keep the nose planted and you'll slide to the outside of the bend.
 

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I was always told that you put new tyres on per axle, and always to keep the newest (grippiest) on the driven axle. This is especially the case for FWD cars, as the front tyres are doing twice the work: they handle steering and propulsion.

I hope you're not counting on oversteer by putting worn tyres on your front axle on a FWD because it is the recipe for massive understeer: you have the heavy engine in the front over the driven axle, so centrifugal forces will be pulling the front of the car to the outside of the bend, with worn tyres you will have noting to keep the nose planted and you'll slide to the outside of the bend.
I have always done what you suggest, but i was advised by a tyre garage several years ago that it should be the other way round.

I was told that you can usually feel when you are pushing it a bit when the front starts to understeer and you can ease off a bit to keep it under control, but if you have more grip on the front and less grip on the back, it is very easy for the back end to break free and overtake you. This can be much less predicatble and also less controlable (if you don't know what to do when it happens). This is much more noticable in winter conditions.
So in answer to your question, no i wasn't counting on oversteer with worn fronts, but quite the opposite.


The ideal solution is of course to have good grip on all tyres and during the winter fit a good set of wheels & winter tyres if possible. If i had the space to store 4 wheels and tyres this is what i'd do.
I currently have about 4mm on the front and 6-7mm on the rears (not changed deliberate, just 6 months wear).

I would be interested to know if the advise i was given has any real merit or not.
Hopefully someone will post a link with facts to which way is the safer / recommended worn tyre configuration :)
 

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I was told by the garage that you should have your best tyres on the rear too. Apart from the understeer control aspect, you want to wear your worst tyres out first. Otherwise you'll end up with hardly worn but old and cracking rears all the time.
 

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@ Alfred TI

I always get sceptical when I get advice about tyre wear from people who make a living ... replacing worn tyres.

We're talking handling/vehicule dynamics here, so there are so many factors (weight distribution, damping, tyre inflation,...) to take into consideration that there is probably no straightforward answer.

I agree with TallPaul when he says evenly worn tyres are the way to go. But your front tyres will always wear out faster than the rear ones, and it seems logical to me that the wheels that need the most grip, get the grippiest tyres.

So for the time being, please don't hold it against me that I keep the best tyres on the front.
 

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@ Alfred TI

I always get sceptical when I get advice about tyre wear from people who make a living ... replacing worn tyres.

We're talking handling/vehicule dynamics here, so there are so many factors (weight distribution, damping, tyre inflation,...) to take into consideration that there is probably no straightforward answer.

I agree with TallPaul when he says evenly worn tyres are the way to go. But your front tyres will always wear out faster than the rear ones, and it seems logical to me that the wheels that need the most grip, get the grippiest tyres.

So for the time being, please don't hold it against me that I keep the best tyres on the front.
I wouldn't hold anything against anyone, no problem.
As you say the advise i was given was from a tyre company and they may have a vested interest.
I will have to have a look at the 5th gear video when i get home. My company blocks youtube :(
 

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Same here :)
Just watched it on my phone and it appears as though the advise i was given is correct.
New/grippier tyres are better to be put on the rear of either front or rear drive cars :)

The down side (or maybe upside) is that with worns fronts i might not be able to get up the hill when it snows, so will have to stay home and watch the tv :lol:
 

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I've just watched it too, feel reassured I suppose. If you were in an emergency situation and steered violently to avoid something then with worn on the front you'd see what you'd hit, with them on the back you'd just be facing the wrong way when you hit them!!!! Best chance of missing something then would be worn on the front foot off the gas and steer gently.....which is what front wheel drive is all about.
 

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I was told years ago, that as rear tyres last for ages they develop cracks, weaknesses etc. making them more liable to "blow-out". Car stability is easier to control in the event of front wheel blow outs. Sounds plausible.
 

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You always want best in rear, as a understeer is safer than an oversteer. With the gri in the front you will tend to get an oversteer.
 
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