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Jip that is poor...

Normally aspirated it seems tho... Which puts the engine close to the 323i BMW engine in terms of kw's..

Yanks increase power by increasing displacement.. They dont know how to gain more power other than increasing displacement :cheese:
 

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Actually if I think about it MA isn't really designed for high revs which is why Ferrari aren't going to use it - its more about a high as possible torque spread across 1000 - 5500 revs and great fuel economy at the same time. So it may only have 200bhp but it probably has loads of torque for a normally aspirated car.
 

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Lol...these bloody Italians why don't they just give a car the maximum power straight out?
 

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Actually if I think about it MA isn't really designed for high revs which is why Ferrari aren't going to use it
If you run individual throttle bodies, the pumping losses are much less, because the volumes between the throttles and the valves are so much smaller.

BMW use it on all it cars in the last 10 years, except the M3, probably for the same reason.
 

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If you run individual throttle bodies, the pumping losses are much less, because the volumes between the throttles and the valves are so much smaller.

BMW use it on all it cars in the last 10 years, except the M3, probably for the same reason.
BMW engines use NO throttles...:thumbs:
 

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BMW engines use NO throttles...:thumbs:
They have both, my M3 has 6 throttles and the E39 V8 has 8. I'm also pretty sure the E46 M3 has 6 individual throttles. Some of the autos have no throttle, I think they call these 'Valvetronic'.
 

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BMW engines use NO throttles...:thumbs:
Like Pud said:
Valvetronic was initially used on BMW's mass-market engines, mostly of the naturally aspirated variety such as the BMW N42 i4 engine, N62 V8, N73 V12, and N52 straight-6. However, turbocharged engines introduced in 2009 such as the single-turboN55 straight-6 and the twin-turbo N74 V12 also make use of Valvetronic.

As of 2010, no high-performance M-series vehicle uses Valvetronic, instead continuing to utilise multiple throttle-bodied designs. The new F10 M5, however, uses valvetronic technology in lieu of the individual throttles its V10 predecessor once had.
 

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When it come to max power, a choke per cylinder is always the strongest.

Side-draught webers with plain distributor, makes more power than multi point fuel injection
With your 159i Alfetta started advancing the intake cam at revs to create a wilder cam in order to equal the power of the sidedaught engines.

On the formule GTI racers the injection was taken off for webers

When sequential injection came with much better timing maps the max power were equal to webers but with much better consumption.

If you have sequential injection, electronic timing, the overlapping cams and now add a choke per cylinder(individual throttles) you have the best max power possible. Like on M3s and Toyota RSIs

Theoretically the MA (valvetronic) should be stronger than ITBs due to less pumping losses, but we have not seen it yet. I am certain it is just a matter of time and that will corrected.

In the case of turbo engines for toys(max power engines), the flow characteristics cause a few problems for these theories.
 
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