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Discussion Starter #1
So my 2000 GTV has had its first once over from Clayton and Giovanni at Alfia Auto. Because it had been very seldomly used for the best part of 10 years, and standing for the last 2, the tank was wrecked along with the carbs and everything in between. The right front and left rear brake calipers were on their way to seizing.

So the calipers were all rebuilt and for good measure the clutch and brake M/C were resleeved. New fluid and the odd new pipe thrown in.

The Dellorto's were stripped, cleaned etc which revealed the need for new carb mounts (still to come). Some fresh Valvoline 20w50 and 4 golden lodge spark plugs rounded off the work done.

Had the car back for about a week now and the difference is night and day, rather obviously given what was wrong. The car is quite perky and there's probably more to come with some fine tuning of the carb setup, and perhaps some consistency with the addition of electronic ignition.

I've been daily driving the car since I got it back and have found the following needs doing:
1. Suspension rubbers. There are lots of knocks, wallowing and nervousness over uneven surfaces.
2. Drivers side door rubber is a bit shot, so there's a gap at the top of the window.
3. Seating position is best described as interesting, need to get the steering wheel closer. Fairly certain I'll be replacing the front seats too because I can't get upright enough.
4. There's an odd noise from the rear when I pull off. From various forum posts it seems that could be one of a vast list of things.
5. The LS appears to have worn to the point of being open
6. I'm hoping a good detail can right the paint work

But all in all I'm loving the experience. It makes every drive, even the one to work and back, an occasion.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I'm sure it's been mentioned on this forum before, but who can I go to for a valuation certificate that I can present to my insurance company?
 

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I'm sure it's been mentioned on this forum before, but who can I go to for a valuation certificate that I can present to my insurance company?
You can ask the Alfa Clubs for a valuation, but those are only valid if you insure through their classic scheme with Indwe. If you are not a club member I suggest you try a classic car dealer.
 

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Car is looking great. Those calipers look brand new.

If your distributor is in good condition the points there is no reason to change over to electronic ignition. Your engine can still be tuned to run very smoothly. Make sure the points are not blamed for other issues like leaking plug wires or a worn distributor shaft. Plus points have become quite cool in this Old Fart's eyes in this digital world. My Giulia is still running old school points & condenser and loving it!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Alfa Club is probably your best bet.
You can ask the Alfa Clubs for a valuation, but those are only valid if you insure through their classic scheme with Indwe. If you are not a club member I suggest you try a classic car dealer.
Thanks. My broker indicates he'd be happy with any valuation certificate, but I guess if the club has a special arrangement with Indwe then they might not want me using it with another provider. I'll ask though.

Car is looking great. Those calipers look brand new.

If your distributor is in good condition the points there is no reason to change over to electronic ignition. Your engine can still be tuned to run very smoothly. Make sure the points are not blamed for other issues like leaking plug wires or a worn distributor shaft. Plus points have become quite cool in this Old Fart's eyes in this digital world. My Giulia is still running old school points & condenser and loving it!
I've been doing some reading today on checking the distributor shaft to confirm that mine is alright. I do generally subscribe to the notion that if it ain't broke, don't fix it. But cold starts are a bit of a pain.
 

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Perhaps some consistency with the addition of electronic ignition. Well done with the brake refurb! Sounds like you got to it just in time.You should get years of happy motoring with the hydraulics refurbed. Giulietta/Alfetta electronic distributor (and coil) will solve hard starting absent plug/leads issues or tired carb diaphragms not pumping efficiently any longer (simple to test the latter). Kevin at AK should have some of these distributors - they are a straight swop. [Quote: I've been daily driving the car since I got it back and have found the following needs doing: 1. Suspension rubbers. There are lots of knocks said:
Check front lower control arm bushes - owners rarely replace the lemford bushes and they make a huge difference to directional stability. Then check the normal stuff - front : Upper and lower ball joints and upper arm bush and steering tie rods. All of these can contribute to clonking as well as anti-roll bar bushes.

[Quote:
2. Drivers side door rubber is a bit shot, so there's a gap at the top of the window.]

You can replace but get used to wind (and other) noises - NHV was not exactly a science with the Italians (and still is not, judging by wind noise on my 2017 Giulia! LoL

[Quote:
3. Seating position is best described as interesting, need to get the steering wheel closer. Fairly certain I'll be replacing the front seats too because I can't get upright enough.]

The seating position on the 105's is generally quite crap. Do not change the seat unless you have tried a different seat and can confirm there is a problem with you particular seat backrest adjuster. Mostly it's a case of some seat shimming, longer Allen key bolts and getting to the most comfortable position you can.

[Quote:

4. There's an odd noise from the rear when I pull off. From various forum posts it seems that could be one of a vast list of things.]

Trailing arm bushes or Trunion (the big T-Bar) bushes. But it could be as simple as the exhaust touching somewhere as these cars squat (especially with soft/old rear springs or shocks) and the exhaust threads over the rear axle and between tank and spare wheel well - lots can touch. Your problem could be as simple as a broken exhaust rubber hanger - rectangular one above the axle)

[Quote:

5. The LS appears to have worn to the point of being open]

They never offered much lock up to start with. About 45% IIRC. Over time the LS clutches wear though the rest of the diff is pretty bullet proof. These clutches can still be bought new (and some people stack them by adding additional ones - as I have) but it's probably more cost effective to do bearings and seals and reset backlash all at one time. Everything is doable at home bar setting the pinion backlash which requires special tools or experience (preferably both). If your diff is not noisy or leaking hold over replacing the LS clutches until ready to refurb the diff.


6. I'm hoping a good detail can right the paint work

But all in all I'm loving the experience. It makes every drive, even the one to work and back, an occasion.
I completely agree, except that driving in regular traffic with a competition clutch is a whole 'nother story! Enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks for the detailed reply, the advice is much appreciated.

Well done with the brake refurb! Sounds like you got to it just in time.You should get years of happy motoring with the hydraulics refurbed. Giulietta/Alfetta electronic distributor (and coil) will solve hard starting absent plug/leads issues or tired carb diaphragms not pumping efficiently any longer (simple to test the latter). Kevin at AK should have some of these distributors - they are a straight swop.
Thanks for the tip. I'll given Kevin a call. I was tempted by a 123 but the price is fairly steep and I'm not sure I'll benefit from the programmability for some time to come (ie until I do some upgrades to the motor).

Check front lower control arm bushes - owners rarely replace the lemford bushes and they make a huge difference to directional stability. Then check the normal stuff - front : Upper and lower ball joints and upper arm bush and steering tie rods. All of these can contribute to clonking as well as anti-roll bar bushes.
I'm getting a complete set of bushes from Classic Alfa. That said, I should probably add a new set of track rod ends and a ball joint kit.


The seating position on the 105's is generally quite crap. Do not change the seat unless you have tried a different seat and can confirm there is a problem with you particular seat backrest adjuster. Mostly it's a case of some seat shimming, longer Allen key bolts and getting to the most comfortable position you can.
I've driven another 105 coupe and found I had the same problem in that one. It's like the cars were built for apes (long arms and short legs). I'll be sure to be very careful in selecting another seat (trial fitting etc before buying).

Trailing arm bushes or Trunion (the big T-Bar) bushes. But it could be as simple as the exhaust touching somewhere as these cars squat (especially with soft/old rear springs or shocks) and the exhaust threads over the rear axle and between tank and spare wheel well - lots can touch. Your problem could be as simple as a broken exhaust rubber hanger - rectangular one above the axle)
I did have some broken exhaust hangers which were recently attended to. Must admit the exhaust still has a lot of movement available to it, but shaking it around it doesn't appear to foul on anything. Some others have also suggested its the trunion bushes. Those are included in the set from Classic Alfa so I'll find out soon enough.

Going through forum posts on the matter I feel like I'm using Web MD to diagnose the cause of a headache. Come out of the experience thinking I've got terminal cancer when all it really is is dehydration. I've seen people say everything from the gearbox mountings backward as a possible cause. One step at a time I guess.

They never offered much lock up to start with. About 45% IIRC. Over time the LS clutches wear though the rest of the diff is pretty bullet proof. These clutches can still be bought new (and some people stack them by adding additional ones - as I have) but it's probably more cost effective to do bearings and seals and reset backlash all at one time. Everything is doable at home bar setting the pinion backlash which requires special tools or experience (preferably both). If your diff is not noisy or leaking hold over replacing the LS clutches until ready to refurb the diff.
I actually believe it was as little as 25% as standard. I see the LS clutch plates around 40GBP from Classic Alfa. There's only two inside a standard LS, add another each side for more lock apparently. The rebuild kit (bearings, seals etc) seems to be around 200GBP though. Still somewhat less than a new diff I suppose.

The diff doesn't appear to be noisy and isn't leaking. It's just frustrating putting power down and feeling the inside wheel slipping when I want some traction.

By the way, what oil do local chaps use for their LS diffs?
 

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Best oil for LSD and gearbox is Redline 75w90
I used 75w90 in my gearbox and 75w90ns in the diff. Meets all the requirements for yellow metals in the box and is used in lots of the racing 105's.

ATS motorsport sells it but I found a company in Germiston selling it for cheaper.
 

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Straight 40W is another alternative for the gearbox. It's important not to use EP oils in the gearbox. NS in the gearbox. I found some Spirax oil years back but then switched to 40 monograde, which performs decently.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Best oil for LSD and gearbox is Redline 75w90
I used 75w90 in my gearbox and 75w90ns in the diff. Meets all the requirements for yellow metals in the box and is used in lots of the racing 105's.

ATS motorsport sells it but I found a company in Germiston selling it for cheaper.
Thanks. Redline is what I see mentioned most on forums but struggled to find someone nearby who is open beyond my working hours (ie on weekends).

Straight 40W is another alternative for the gearbox. It's important not to use EP oils in the gearbox. NS in the gearbox. I found some Spirax oil years back but then switched to 40 monograde, which performs decently.
Someone locally recommended Castrol BOT 402 75W-85...thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well done with the brake refurb! Sounds like you got to it just in time.You should get years of happy motoring with the hydraulics refurbed. Giulietta/Alfetta electronic distributor (and coil) will solve hard starting absent plug/leads issues or tired carb diaphragms not pumping efficiently any longer (simple to test the latter). Kevin at AK should have some of these distributors - they are a straight swop.
Do Giulietta/Alfetta's not run vacuum advance?
 

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Do Giulietta/Alfetta's not run vacuum advance?
Some did and some did not (have a vacuum advance). But if you find one with a vacuum advance plumbing in a vacuum take off will be easy enough. I also had a problem finding redline for my diff and ended up using castrol LS diff oil (from Autozone). Can't remember the weight spec but it's the same oil used by a specialist SA manufacture of BMW clutch type LSD's used in local racing. So far no problems.Lastly, also check your steering box for wondering steering. They can be tightened a little (too much and you can crack the casing!). They also suffer from eternal incontinence and ****** the steering fluid - even with new seals. I pumped mine full of graphite grease - as recommended by some wiser ones. No more leaks!
 

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Some did and some did not (have a vacuum advance). But if you find one with a vacuum advance plumbing in a vacuum take off will be easy enough. I also had a problem finding redline for my diff and ended up using castrol LS diff oil (from Autozone). Can't remember the weight spec but it's the same oil used by a specialist SA manufacture of BMW clutch type LSD's used in local racing. So far no problems.Lastly, also check your steering box for wondering steering. They can be tightened a little (too much and you can crack the casing!). They also suffer from eternal incontinence and ****** the steering fluid - even with new seals. I pumped mine full of graphite grease - as recommended by some wiser ones. No more leaks!
Pumping the steering boxes full of grease was actually a recommended fix for leaking steering boxes right from ARSA in those days. They gave the dealers instruction to do this.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Changed the gearbox oil this weekend. No more grinding into second which is nice. Gear changes feel more positive now too. Got to find the right redline for the diff then I'll do that change.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Apparently E30 BMW seats are a relatively easy fit. I've also read some people speak of 147 seats being fairly straightforward. Finding 2 door versions retains access to the rear which is a positive. Anyone got any thoughts?
 

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Another thing not mentioned which could contribute to steering issues and nervousness is your steering idler arm bushes and shaft, you can lean over the passenger side of your engine compartment and try to push and pull on the arm, if there is any play it needs to be addressed, makes a big difference. If you are lucky it is only the self-lubricating metal bush that needs to be replaced, I paid R37.00 each at BG Bearings, more likely that the shaft has been damaged over the years. Classic Alfa does have a repair kit but it will involve some engineering from a shop.
 

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Wow. Going through this again, I realised what a great source of info this is. Someone should make it a sticky thread.
 
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