Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Now, don't get me wrong, I do appreciate that farmers have a hard job of work to do, but....

Why do they have to bring it home with them on their tractor wheels and let it drip and plop off their ramshackle and downright ludicrously overloaded trailers and deposit it all over the public roads? :ranting:

This morning, following overnight rain, my route to work was basically transformed into a dangerous slimy skid pan with lumps of errr, stuff :vs_poop: , liberally scattered along it. Why am I always being lectured that its speed that kills when these slow moving sh*t spreading machines are allowed to make a road so dangerous to other road users that any speed is dangerous? Isn't there any requirement to clean up after themselves? If I were to let my dog dump just anywhere without cleaning up after him I'd soon be prosecuted, so why are these arrogant morons allowed to get away with it? Is it because the tractor is invariably being driven by a 12 year old, or are tractor drivers above the law?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
I sympathise. Used to live in deepest Gloucestershire and local roads were sometimes a mud bath stretched out! My wife skidded on a patch once and went into a wall, she successfully sued the farmer. However I think it was only because the accident happened within a certain distance of the farm itself. They also used to use those wide shallow rollers with the spikes on and cause ruts in the road surface which made it noisy and slippy when wet, now that's damage!
Bet you wash the motor a lot. :angry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,319 Posts
Used to live in deepest Gloucestershire
I sympathise.

:p





It's all part-and-parcel of living in the c'un'ry, Shirley?

Just like having to deal with traffic pollution and dog-eggs if you live in a town or city.



Excellent rantage though, OP. :thumbs:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I've noticed recently as well, the farmers around here (Gloucestershire(!) and Wiltshire) must have got rich or have possibly formed a co-operative to buy more expensive farm equipment, including faster tractors (fast tractor, that's good coming from a JTDM driver like me :embarrassed: ) which mean they believe they don't need to pull over any more (not that they did before) and let the dung dodging queues of traffic stuck behind them by - have you seen just how high a tractor wheel can project a lump of field? Incoming!!.

And they all seem to have fields miles apart so you get stuck behind them for even longer :cry:

You'd think that amongst all the gadgets they fit to these modern tractors (sat nav, air con, radios, coffee machine, snaggle tooth, personal massage service........all right, I made up one of those), that someone must have invented something to clean off their bloody wheels before leaving their slurry pits. They could call it, oh I don't know, a brush?

I'm gonna go for a ramble over their fields this weekend wearing a pair of boots that dispense tar as I go, see if they complain :devious: Might even take the dog......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,306 Posts
Did a quick google and this came up
Mud on the roads - what is a farmer 's legal duty?

It would seem that farmers can be prosecuted for leaving excessive amounts of mud on the road and, in deed, sued if they cause an accident.

Perhaps it is time to report it to the county highways department and bring pressure to bear for a few prosecutions to get the message across that tyres should be scraped down before leaving the field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
OK, let's set a few matters straight

It won't be s**t on the road unless they've been moving animals. It will be mud. And it won't be for far. Farmers should put up warning signs near gate entrances to warn other road users (most do around here). To deal with this, all you need to do is read the road and moderate your speed. It's no worse than spillt oil on the road.

And I find building developers are usually worse offenders as they have multiple movements each day.

Farmers haven't got rich. They are mostly using contractors.

To give an example, anyone spraying a field has to have a valid, up to date certificate to say they are capable of spraying. This is neither cheap nor easy. So the contractor comes along with modern kit. It sprays acurately, being controlled by computer and GPS. It's also probably MUCH bigger than the farmer's old kit. But he's going to come from a distance. So he uses a JCB tractor (or similar). These can do 40MPH. And the farmer is saving money.

The same applies to drilling and combining.

As each year a large number of farmers go bankrupt, any economy should be viewed by us as worthwhile!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,306 Posts
I accept what you say however, whether it is an agricultural contractor or the farmer, there is still a legal requirement to clean the wheels before leaving the field. In general civil engineering or building contractors, knowing they will otherwise be prosecuted, will provide a mechanical roadbrush and at least make an attempt to keep the large lumps of mud off the road. Round here the major problems occur where root crops are being harvested and there are regular vehicle movements out of the same access point which rapidly develops into a mudbath. Tractor tyres, with cleats designed to transfer large forces to the soil, very easily hold much larger lumps of mud than the road tyre of a lorry and these lumps then drop off onto the road at considerable distances from the access point.

Oh and it can be s**t on the road. Livestock farmers will spread the slurry from animal sheds onto the fields transporting it there in tankers. It is not unknown for the discharge valve on the tank to dribble a bit and leave a clear trail up the road from farm buildings to the field being treated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,682 Posts
We have a similar thing around here, although it is lorries full of soil and gravel which spill their loads all over the roads.

They also tend to drive during the rush hour holding up large queues of traffic behind them.


My car also ends up really filthy in no time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
Years ago I had a driving course to teach in Petersfield and lived in Chichester. At one point I was driving up a small valley, but the problem was that it had :censored: down with rain the night before just after they'd spread the fields both sides of the road. The road was basically a slurry pit a few inches deep in liquid :censored:. The first thing I did was take the pupil, who luckily had a bit of experience, for a real world driving lesson - fill up the car and put it through the nearest car was with an underneath spray option. They thought it was great fun too!

It took days for the smell to leave the car and I'm sure pupils thought I'd crapped myself during a lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
For me I live in the sticks and for many years now I've accepted the fact that farmers abide by no rules. I'm not even shocked when I see a random hay bale that's half on the grass verge half on the road ( usually get 3 or 4 a year) because they fail to tie down a load securely. Two kids in the cab of a tractor combined age of 24 with a dog perched between the seat and back window. 20mph trailer limits excited all the time. The lists go on and on but if I ignore the potential of instant death when encountering these lunatics it's usually something to laugh at I suppose
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,904 Posts
I once got fertilized by an aircraft. Had to do an emergency stop when he appeared over the hill and obliterated the windscreen with yellow gunge.

(No Alfa Romeos were harmed in this incident).
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top