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Discussion Starter #1
Bit of a silly title I know, can do so if I want but it’s the waiting around for years just to get an A license that bothers me.
It’s a good thing I suppose how they force you to have years of experience before moving up and I think I’d enjoy just riding and learning to ride on something that isn’t a moped!

I feel too old to start from the beginning, at 33 to get a CBT licence which allows you do ride essentially a push bike in terms of speed and then an A2 for 125cc limitations. How long do you need to wait for an A2? I know the CBT is usually achieved in one day..?


So, just wondering if it’s worth learning now and does anyone else here ride and can maybe offer additional info on the licenses etc as it’s quite confusing as a total bike noob.
 

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Doing your CVT let's you ride a 125 on L plates but only lasts 2 years. Direct access, as the name suggests, gives you direct access to bigger bikes after a few days training and passing your test.
 

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I like bikes and have ridden a few but I also know a few people who have been killed on or have suffered life changing injuries on them.


Not sure i would want one now that I have a family.


But as a bit of fun on a nice day they cannot be beaten.
 

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I've watched too many episodes of 24 Hours in A&E and I have to say it is your decision but be aware of the danger you'll face every minute you're on the road.

Dangers for motorbikes:

Diesel
Gravel
Manhole covers
Drain covers
Rain
White lines
Debris on road
Dirt on road
Stupid drivers
Stupid pedestrians
Stupid animals


etc etc, you get what I'm saying.
 

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I considered it a little while ago, even had my deposit down on a YZF125 - (yes... all show, no go), a CBT is easily done with short notice allowing you to get a taste of motorcycling life.

I have a couple of friends who have had bikes since the age of 16, only 1 of which still does at the age of 36, another friend who did a direct access course, passed first time and was on his first bike in no time, an R6 - he scared himself witless on the thing, and hardly rode it, trading it for a lesser powered model some years later - still hardly rode it.

Like Symon, I also know at least 3 people who have been killed on bikes, 2 more who suffered injuries which swore them off bikes for life and 1 nutjob who it didn't.

I'm far from the best driver out there, but a large amount of other people's lack of driving skills, and road sense terrifies me, that and the occasional seasonal use, the having to dress in full protective gear even in the height of summer and the fact some pikey would probably have it away put me off in the end.

I'd love a full-liveried Ducati 916, but as a piece of artwork
 

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A Lotus 7 type Kit car or similar lightweight with a powerful engine should give you almost bike like thrills without the need to take an extra test or wear protective clothing.

Plus as you cannot fall or be knock off a car it should be a lot safer into the bargain.
 

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I've a friend whose got a Caterham 420R, and that's just as scary!

Luckily my fat arse doesn't quite fit in the seats, so I've an excuse not to get in - I'm sure I could make it fit in the drivers seat though, strangely said friend doesn't want to let me try.
 

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I should point out that I’ve been riding bikes since the age of 16, I’m now 53. Never had an accident, never come off. I do however take an advanced riding refresher every couple of years. It’s all about planning, reading the road and staying within the speed limits in 30’s,40’s and 50’s.
As the years go by I definitely ride less(2000 miles a year) but my bikes are always ready to go should a decent free day come along.
The MV Agusta rates at 176 bhp. Do I ever need/use it? Probably not but it is a helluva machine, they don’t call MV’s motorcycle art for nothing.

Id say go for it. Take it easy,get some advanced training and remember the throttle goes both ways.
Drop me a pm if you want any info

Fred

My MV F4 1000cc

If
 

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Got the same problem, in that I’m tempted to do the bike test but I am kind of averse to getting mildly mutilated or dead. It’s a permanent loop from “lots of people ride one every day and don’t get killed” through “I’m careful and haven’t really had any accidents in the car” to “That slipper-wearing halfwit would have t-boned me and not even noticed while he was twarting about tuning his radio”

:rolleyes:
 

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Do it. I did a direct access course back in 2000. Now got a lovely 2003 Triumph Sprint ST955i. Comfy sports tourer capable of (test track only) 150mph and will do 200 miles on a single tank
 

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Do it, but do it properly. Wear the right gear and read the road like Fred said. It makes me cringe when I see people ride with no gloves on and just a t-shirt and shorts, unless of course they are on a scooter and then they deserve whatever is thrown at them. As a Brucey bonus I bet it will make you a better car driver too. You gain a kind of sixth sense for detecting idiots and quickly learn how to drive/ride defensively.

Good luck and enjoy
 

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I should point out that I’ve been riding bikes since the age of 16, I’m now 53. Never had an accident, never come off. I do however take an advanced riding refresher every couple of years. It’s all about planning, reading the road and staying within the speed limits in 30’s,40’s and 50’s.
As the years go by I definitely ride less(2000 miles a year) but my bikes are always ready to go should a decent free day come along.
The MV Agusta rates at 176 bhp. Do I ever need/use it? Probably not but it is a helluva machine, they don’t call MV’s motorcycle art for nothing.

Id say go for it. Take it easy,get some advanced training and remember the throttle goes both ways.
Drop me a pm if you want any info

Fred

My MV F4 1000cc

If
Well said, Fred.
Toilet Roll, I haven’t been quite so lucky. I met a bloke entirely by accident once who was doing a U-turn over the crest of a hill on a curve. Survived that one with just a bruised back, a broken coccyx and a few grazes. (Thanks to full leathers) Fell off in the dirt in the middle of nowhere once too and ended up getting a lift to hospital via the Flying Doctor Service. A bit hard to ride with a badly dislocated shoulder. Nothing else to mention in the past 35 years. I’ve done several rider training and cornering school days along the way to hone skills and reinforce correct technique as well as attempting to rid myself of acquired bad habits.
Car drivers always say bikes are dangerous and that cars are safe as if people aren’t killed or maimed in cars every day. You’ve just got to be very defensive in your riding and positioning yourself on the road relative to the surrounding traffic and anticipate. Treat ‘em all like potential homicidal idiots and you should survive. If you’re a timid type, forget it. Forty years riding, all but two on Guzzis. My two cents (Tuppence?).
May I also recommend Moto Guzzi as your choice of motor bicycle. Relaxed and characterful, with almost 100 years of history behind it. It’ll give your Alfa quality company in your garage too.
As your Forum name suggests, you’ll probably need an extra few in the first year or two of riding with the scares you’ll give yourself. Lol.
 

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Hmm, yes, motorcycling.

I have been on bikes for 48 years.I have been to many different countries, rode the Alps many times. It really is totally different to driving a car. TOTALLY.
My accountant has an R8. and drives it fast, really fast. He is a good driver.
I used to go to his office on my bike, so much so that he decided to 'get a bike'
He bought a new (then) VFR800. He asked me to ride it to give him my approval.
It was ok, not a bit of me, but ok.
I took him for a ride where I was leading and he was following. I said I would ride at his pace to help him get to grips with riding.
I rode down a lovely country road, at 50, couldn't see him, so I slowed down, 40, then 30, then 20. He eventually came into view gripping the bars for dear life and not enjoying it at all.
He sold it soon after.
I bought my Alfa as a bike antidote. I now go out in the Spider, which I really enjoy, when I would have gone on the bike. I do still ride but not as much. So if I was in my 30's and thinking of getting a bike for the first time. I would start small and take my time to get up to a larger machine. I would NOT NOT buy a sports bike, kiss of death. I would get a Deauville or something equally pedestrian, as a second or third bike. If you think you are going to pass your test then get an R1 (yawn) then it will be a quick trip to casualty.
Motorcycling can be great fun, so long as you are not influenced by the top speed and the 0 to 60 times. Only a goon buys a sports bike early in their riding career. I could go on, but I have to go to work.
Bikes are great. But it has to be the bike YOU can ride. NOT the bike you would like in your garage.
 

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Go for it, otherwise it’s a regret.

I had motorbikes all my adult life up to 40. I decided then I’d had enough. The inattentive idiots on the road started to bother me, it’s worse now with mobile phones, satnavs and the general decline in driving standards.

To compensate for that you’ll have to develop a sixth, seventh and eighth sense to be able to read the situations seconds before they unfold. Taxis are the worst offenders and everyone else a very close second.

I miss my Kawasaki 750GT, but it was becoming a highly polished ornament in the garage.

Go for it, if it doesn’t work out your family can sell the motorcycle to help with your rehab. :lol:
 

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Today

Today I just learned that a former work colleague of mine was killed in a motorcycle crash last week.

44 years old, had a couple of kids plus an older one, as well as a young grandchild.

I know you never know what is around the corner with anything in life, but it seems to me that the older I get it is best to minimise the risk of dying early whenever you can...

Sorry to put a dampener on your aspirations of getting a bike, but for me they are just too dangerous.
 

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I always remember the story Stephen Fry tells,

*"I shall divert for a revealing story a friend told to me round about this time. Her aunt had been checked into Moorefields eye hospital, where she was due for a corneal graft, cataract operation or similar routine, but none the less a delicate opthalmic procedure. She was lying in bed wondering what was up, when the consultant came in. 'Ah Miss Tredaway, how do you do? You've had the operation explained? What we do is cut out your nasty cloudy old lens and replace it with a shiney new donor one. Simple as can be. Trouble is we don't have any eyes in at the moment.'
'Oh'
'I shouldn't worry, though.' He went to the window and looked out over the City Road, 'It's raining, so it wont be very long'"

*The Fry Chronicles. Stephen Fry. Penguin UK.
 

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I rode motor bikes for years and covered thousands of miles on one, both here and abroad.
They are dangerous, don't believe anyone who tries to tell you otherwise, but that is what makes them such a useful tool for learning road craft.
On a bike you will not be cocooned in a metal box like you are in a car, so you will feel, and are, much more exposed. This will make you much more aware of your surroundings, you will learn things about the road that most car drivers didn't know existed/mattered. I.E. the wind that blows through the gaps in road side hedge-ways, the changes in road surface and the different amounts of grip those different surfaces provide, the information that the white lines down the middle of the road give you and, not least, just how bad other road users are. You will also be more aware of other road users, such as motor cyclist's, cyclist's and even pedestrians.
Then after a couple of years you would return to car driving a much better driver because of all the extra knowledge you had gained without really noticing, or indeed knowing you were lacking it to begin with.

Don't listen to other people telling you what style of machine you should ride, I am sure they all mean well but different styles suit different people, myself, I always preferred sports bikes, they provided the type of excitement (to me) that more staid styles just couldn't, you will make your own mind up when the time comes.

We all know (or used to know) people who have died or been injured on a bike, I used to work in the prosthetic industry and a proportion of our clients were motorcyclist's, but at the end of the day there are a number of things that can kill you, so you would need to be sensible, wear visible clothing (I don't mean dayglo jackets, just visible colours and not black), ride defensively and assume everyone else is about to do something stupid. A bike will provide you with thrills and excitement a car, any car, just can't.

Mick.
 
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