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What? Portugal is not in that list? Something must be wrong... ;)
 

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Quite impressed that Spain and Italy are so far down the list. The UK is so near the bottom of the list, I don't think the government should be allowed to install any further speed cameras or traffic calming measures. It's quite clearly a waste of money - they should be building more roads!
 

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Slovenian roads are not very dangerous for normal people. Only idiots who drive 150km/h on B roads kill themselves, and unfortunately they sometimes take someone else with them :(
 

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I love these surveys, they tell you absolutely nowt. There is no such thing as a bad Country to drive in. Every country can point to good and bad areas or towns or individual roads. Take France for instance; anyone who has driven in or around Paris will swear it's the worst place in the World....until they try Rome...or.....Prague...yes, you get the picture?
 

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Cyprus - I like it there :cool:

You should try driving here - in 2006 there were 270 reported road deaths - not bad for a country with less than 1 million inhabitants and only 50% of those actually drive :rolleyes:
 

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Well this survey is based on numbers, rather than expierience. I'm sure Romania should be up there in the top 10 !

If you think those places are bad..head down to countries like Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, when I was in those places I was surprised there weren't more people killed on the roads!
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
When I was in Poland, I saw three accidents in the same day. One happened just in front of my eyes. The driver swerved to miss a car that had hit a barrier and he hit the barrier as well. Another accident was fatal. My wife saw a dead body covered up with a lifeless hand just showing under the covers. The last was a car on fire with a person in it.

I think the Baltic countries have higher rates per head due to the fact that drink/drive laws are not so well enforced and there is also a higher level of corruption (perceived at any rate).

My wife was nearly killed by a truck driver once (pushed off the road by the driver overtaking them). Even though they knew which company owned the truck the company said they didn't know who was driving! Had to let the incident go as the police advised them that as no one was killed they couldn't do anything about it.
 

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I've always rather enjoyed driving in places like Rome and Paris. It's like being on the dodgems all day. But then, I used to be a London despatch rider a long time ago.

Kudos to the Dutch though; significantly better stats than anyone else. Whilst Holland may not be a driver's paradise, they know how to give all road users a fair crack of the whip.
 

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If you dont wear a seat belt or sit with your baby on your lap in the front seat then you have to expect the worst in an accident - some people just dont get safety

I see it everyday - the large round hole in the windscreen in front of the driver, proud parents with their toddler sitting on their knee in the front seat, loose kids playing on the centre control, kids hanging out of car windows :rolleyes:

I've lived here for about 8 years and I still feel sick when I see those things
 

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I cycled from Prague to Vienna in October last year and found the Czechs to be pretty good drivers. They didn't drive like they despise cyclists/joggers as they do here in the UK, and they indicate more often.
 

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I'm not surprised by that at all. I've never actually driven myself in Lithuania, but I've been driven around it quite a lot by friends / family and it's the one thing about Lithuania that makes me slightly uncomfortable. (But still go and visit, it's fun!)

I think the reason for it is a combination of things:
1) bad roads, so people are often swerving to avoid potholes (this is also connected to the weather, which I'll come back to)

2) generally, it has to be said, poor driving, and particularly poor anticipation, driving too fast and too close etc

3) the age of the cars: lots of people drive cars that are 6-10 years old and don't have all the modern safety features

4) the weather: notice that many (though not all) the countries near the top of the list have pretty serious winters. All the ice and snow not only breaks up the road surface, making driving more difficult and dangerous, but it also presents a whole world of challenges we don't face regularly in the UK. Just think how bad it is when a few centimeters of snow falls here... I also spend a lot of time on Swedish roads and it's the same there. Once the snow falls (which it was doing when I left on Sunday) it can stay as a pretty deep covering (easily six inches) of frozen snow on the roads all through the winter. This doesn't last for 3 days, it can last solidly for 3 months, up to March, on all roads, major and minor, you just can't clear away that volume of snow so you live with it. In Sweden as part of the driving test you have to pass a skid-pan ice driving test on top of the usual reverse parking etc. In the winter months you have to run your car on special winter tyres which have deeper treads and small metal studs embedded in the rubber.
 
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