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I appear to have accidentally over inflated my tyres owing to a digital tyre inflater giving me the wrong readings.

I was wondering what was the most accurate way to gauge actual tyre pressure owing to the fact I can't trust the digital gauge any more.

Is there a particular product that people can vouch for?

Im wary of the cheapo digital/metal ones off ebay
 

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I dabbled with a couple of electronic ones, endless fiddling with batteries, switches, trying to read the display ... got one of the old school types as AlfaDrivingFan has linked to. Easily the best option.
 

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I have an electronic one and as far as I know it is pretty accurate, it gives the same readings as the gauge on my mini compressor as well as my dads mechanical gauge.
 

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The most accurate type of gauge for not much money is the pencil gauge (link above).

I've got one which I calibrate against the dial gauge on my footpump. I discovered that the foot pump gauge reads slightly low. Initially I trusted that more but I was getting more wear in the centre of the tyre (over-inflation). I "tweaked" the dial to match the pencil gauge and now all's well. :)

How do you know your tyres are over-inflated? You muct have checked the pressure with <something> to come to that conclusion. Is the <something> correct?


Ralf S.
 

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Local petrol station.

They have to have theirs calibrated regularly whereas anything
you buy will only be reliably accurate the day you buy it.
There has to be a caveat there.

There appears to be no prescribed frequency of testing other than a recommendation from Trading Standards that air equipment is tested against a calibrated gauge at the same time that fuel pumps are tested. In their annual report for example, Hull City Council declared that they test only 50% of their petrol stations every year for the accuracy of fuel delivery.
That means that your garage air line might be tested for accuracy once every 2 years (or more if not a priority service station), which given the hard use the equipment gets doesn't seem satisfactory to me.
 

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There has to be a caveat there.

There appears to be no prescribed frequency of testing other than a recommendation from Trading Standards that air equipment is tested against a calibrated gauge at the same time that fuel pumps are tested. In their annual report for example, Hull City Council declared that they test only 50% of their petrol stations every year for the accuracy of fuel delivery.
That means that your garage air line might be tested for accuracy once every 2 years (or more if not a priority service station), which given the hard use the equipment gets doesn't seem satisfactory to me.
The failure to test fuel delivery is far more worrying than the accuracy of the airline. At least for air pressure you have an alternative.

Are Hull City Council typical?:confused:
 

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There has to be a caveat there.

There appears to be no prescribed frequency of testing other than a recommendation from Trading Standards that air equipment is tested against a calibrated gauge at the same time that fuel pumps are tested. In their annual report for example, Hull City Council declared that they test only 50% of their petrol stations every year for the accuracy of fuel delivery.
That means that your garage air line might be tested for accuracy once every 2 years (or more if not a priority service station), which given the hard use the equipment gets doesn't seem satisfactory to me.
Conversely, any device at home is under no obligation to be
checked, ever. In fact I doubt if any are, ever. I wonder why
anyone would have more faith in their home device that has
never been checked since its date if manufacture?
 

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I have a couple of cheapo chinese digital multimeters here, and I have tested them against calibrated fluke items and they are all pretty much spot on.

Why would the accuracy of a digital tyre gauge be any different?
 

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To a cheapo chinese multimeter.

Why would a tyre gauge be any less accurate to one of those?

The mecanical pencil type ones I have found to vary a fair bit, and it only takes a small speck of dirt inside the sliding part to cause erroneous readings.
 
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The forecourt tyre inflating machines only have to checked and calibrated on a regular basis if they are paying ones as they fall into the ' weights and measure act. The freebies do not come under that because they are free.
 

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On the other hand.. take your car to a well-known fast fit tyre place and ask them to set the pressure to be correct for your car.

Take it home and measure the pressure cold with your reader. If it's accurate, it will say 50PSI. :D


Ralf S.
 

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Or just let all of the air out.

That way the gauge will read 0. ;)
 

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The other problem with using one at a garage is that your tyres will not in fact be cold, so the pressure you're measuring will not be directly relevant to the pressure you're interested in.
 

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The other problem with using one at a garage is that your tyres will not in fact be cold, so the pressure you're measuring will not be directly relevant to the pressure you're interested in.
I have also found that it is better to measure tyre pressures when the car is either in the shade or on a dull day.

If the car is parked so that some of the tyres are in the sun the pressures go all over the place.
 

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It is amazing how much difference it can make, I agree.
 
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