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you didn't replace the piston rings? How come?
Wrt oil temperature, why don't you try via OBD2 and see if it is the sensor or just the gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter #182 (Edited)
you didn't replace the piston rings? How come?
Wrt oil temperature, why don't you try via OBD2 and see if it is the sensor or just the gauge.
When I took the Brera engine apart, on the floor of my mate's barn, they did not look worn and there were no marks on the bores. Subsequently, Adam who took it out of his brothers Brera said the mileage was only in the 40 thousand region. When Scholar rebuilt the engine, they checked the rings for wear - measuring them up. And they as good as new. Plus there was very little wear on the PTFE? coating on the piston.

Secondly, I considered the fact that my 159 had been dyno - ed and was making better than spec wrt horsepower - better than unmodified engines, with less mileage. Mine has 112,000 - ish miles, so to make such power the rings/pistons can't be bad.

Thirdly, it my belief the pistons and rings are "Mahler", who have a fine reputation in development and production circles.

Fourthly, Alfa wanted £900 + for a set of rings and I am tired of sponsoring perpetual failures.

So the "Risk" was taken and I re - used the original rings. I shall be rebuilding the engine removed from my 159 and because she made good power levels, those rings too, will be reused. I do not expect to see any substantial wear on the bore either, so the engine will be sold with a balanced crankshaft, pistons and con rods, and a baffled/modified sump, with CLLS for those that are interested.

I can have your sump baffled if you want, at cost. I want to get my engine builder established as an Alfa specialist and am more than happy to put work their way - they did such a good job on my engine.

If you want to do this, I will have them modify my spare engine sump and we can exchange as and when. Otherwise, it will be modified and sold with the engine, when it is rebuilt.

It's not the gauge! That hasn't changed. But it may be the sensor. I expected a drop in temperature, but I need to confirm that it is the modifications which resulted in the temperature drop. So I have just ordered a K - Type thermocouple and hand held display module to determine the truth of what I believe.

Been out today in my toy! Awesome! Still not pushing too much. But God it is different. According to Scholar, she is running a little rich. But I will live with that for the time being.
 

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Discussion Starter #183
you didn't replace the piston rings? How come?
Wrt oil temperature, why don't you try via OBD2 and see if it is the sensor or just the gauge.
I think the fact that the rings on the Brera and the 159 making better than published power figures for a new engine, suggesting its rings are also good, is testament to how well the spray jets work on lubricating the underside of the pistons.
 

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I think the fact that the rings on the Brera and the 159 making better than published power figures for a new engine, suggesting its rings are also good, is testament to how well the spray jets work on lubricating the underside of the pistons.
According to my mechanic, the rings start wearing down at about approximately 100k miles.But if yours are at 40k then it makes sense.
 

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I've stripped 200, 000 mile motors for parts and found rings still within tolerances...good oil changed frequently should mean the the rings/bores won't be the reason an engine dies. I had the sump of my 151,000 159 to replace the oil pump seal....your could still see the cross hatch marks on the bores!
 

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Discussion Starter #186
According to my mechanic, the rings vegin wearing down at about approximately 100k miles.But if yours are at 40k then it makes sense.
I read somewhere, I think it was reference the Holden/Chrysler version of this engine - substantially the same engine, is designed around a life of 150,000 miles. Of course it depends very much how well the engine has been treated. But there is no question, spray jets add greatly to the longevity of cylinder bores and piston rings. But the cost of a set of new rings is ludicrous.

For those that are contemplating the Giulia, what pricing policy are Alfa going to adopt for spares when these cars come on the market second hand? Parts for BMW are so cheap, probably because there are so many of their cars on the road. So a V10 or V12 Beemer is a real prospect for some enthusiasts. Alfa's are not.

This, I think is another reason why the Busso is going to become even more desirable. It was in production, if one includes with Lancia, for 28 - 9 years. And that will make the re - manufacturing of certain components economic. The 1750 TBi - killed, along with the 2.2 and 3.2 JTS engines after one run. Who is going to re - manufacture any components for the few cars that exist, even so soon after sales stopped. If Fiat had any concern for the Marque, they would sell it to Audi.

I think I am coming to respect the 3.2 JTS more as a great GM/Holden engine and I value that above what Alfa have done with it. The Insignia 2.8 VXR Turbo, the SAAB 2.8 Turbo equivalent and the Holden 3.6 are great engines. The 3.2 JTS, in standard guise ia not!
 

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Discussion Starter #187
I read somewhere, I think it was reference the Holden/Chrysler version of this engine - substantially the same engine, is designed around a life of 150,000 miles. Of course it depends very much how well the engine has been treated. But there is no question, spray jets add greatly to the longevity of cylinder bores and piston rings. But the cost of a set of new rings is ludicrous.

For those that are contemplating the Giulia, what pricing policy are Alfa going to adopt for spares when these cars come on the market second hand? Parts for BMW are so cheap, probably because there are so many of their cars on the road. So a V10 or V12 Beemer is a real prospect for some enthusiasts. Alfa's are not.

This, I think is another reason why the Busso is going to become even more desirable. It was in production, if one includes with Lancia, for 28 - 9 years. And that will make the re - manufacturing of certain components economic. The 1750 TBi - killed, along with the 2.2 and 3.2 JTS engines after one run. Who is going to re - manufacture any components for the few cars that exist, even so soon after sales stopped. If Fiat had any concern for the Marque, they would sell it to Audi.

I think I am coming to respect the 3.2 JTS more as a great GM/Holden engine and I value that above what Alfa have done with it. The Insignia 2.8 VXR Turbo, the SAAB 2.8 Turbo equivalent and the Holden 3.6 are great engines. The 3.2 JTS, in standard guise ia not!

Brian Moyle
Sat 08/02/2020 09:58
  • Mauro Bosio - ACAR RAM

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Hi Mauro, Hope you and Yours are all well.

I have copied you an email to Richard in Aus. He fitted my oil way modifications about 18 months ago and since then we have kept in touch about the way our cars have been performing.

This is a YouTube video of a 159 fitted with Colombo Bariani Special Camshafts.


Mine sounds nothing like this. Admittedly, it has a rather nice exhaust system, but the over - run on the engine is very untidy - scruffy even. And I put that down to poor oil pressure, failing to keep the timing chains taught and failing to rotate the VVT's quickly enough. I'm not impressed at all really. Lovely cams and the exhaust and Brembo brakes are a bit special.

But really, I can understand why Alfa Dropped the engine so quickly, yet I won't forgive them for not sorting the problems out. Ridiculous being they spent so much developing the heads, to have neglected the oil ways when a first year graduate from Milan University could have spotted the problems in no time at all.

However, you must extend my gratitude to Mr. Bariani for the camshafts. They are absolutely superb. In conjunction with the Autodelta Manifolds, the difference is nothing short of astounding. I don't think they would have been quite so impressive without improving the dynamic response of the VVT System and the tension of the chains - which my mods are intended to address, but that is not the fault of the camshafts, or the manifolds.

It is difficult to overstate the difference the camshafts have made to this engine. The oil temperature has dropped like a stone - helped no doubt by the removal of the Manifold Cats. And I don't intend to teach granny to suck eggs, but as I said, the flexibility of the engine at low revs in itself is remarkable. However, and I am still "Trying" to be gentle whilst running the engine in, there is absolutely no comparison to be made with this engine in standard form. Even for road use, the brakes are now inadequate for the performance of the engine. The chassis is superb, but the engine overwhelms it now, and it will need some bracing and suspension firming up.

The engine spools up very turbine - like, and seamlessly. It was difficult for me to appreciate how a good VVT system could improve the performance of an engine. But clearly the profile of the camshafts suits the response time of the VVT's and although that could be re - engineered to quicken the dynamic response further, and I know it is a little stretch of the imagination, the engines response to the throttle, is virtually instantaneous.

Pulling away has to be done sedately, not to destroy the illusion that this is quite a luxurious car for Alfa. Because hitting the throttle, particularly as the F40 gearbox has triple cones on first and second; slowing gear changes down, is pretty ugly. From second onwards is much better. And from then on, its strength quickly becomes apparent.

Once again, Many thanks to you and Mr Bariani. It has taken a while to get the car back on the road and there is still more to do. But the huge jump in performance has made it all worthwhile.

Hi! Richard,

Just thought I would update you further wrt my 159. The car stood for so long, clearly the petrol had deteriorated so initially it was a little lumpy and I had my first ever Lambda metering failure. Once that was reset and a few tanks of RON 99 fuel went through the system, all good.

The problem with the twin catalytic will be resolved in the next few weeks, but for the time being, I am staying away from 2500 rpm, above or below, but not at - which happens to occur at 70 mph in sixth. So, I am either going too slow, or breaking the speed limit to avoid it.

However, don't let anyone tell you manufacturing tolerances are so good nowadays, that crankshafts, pistons and con - do not need balancing. You only notice it at high revs - or so it is said!

That is absolute rubbish. My Alfetta 2.5 GTV was balanced in the eighties and it became very "Turbine - like", the way she would spool up - again with Colombo Bariani Camshafts.

Well, as you know I had the original Brera Crankshaft straightened and re - ground for +.25 oversize bearings - mains and big ends. But because the guys who straightened the crank had to shave some metal off to get the wedges in, and I didn't know how much it was, I had Scholar the engine builder, balance it for me. They used my new one: bought from Rev - High in Aus, as a reference.

Well, the result is, it is super smooth throughout the range with no hesitation at all. It really is silky smooth and totally vibration free. In fact, when away from 2500 rpm, it is so quiet, one could be forgiven for thinking it is running at all. It is really only given away by the lovely exhaust note which rises in pitch with the revs. When that 2500 rpm drone is fixed, it will be the finest Alfa I have ever owned. Maybe not the most loved and certainly not the most charismatic - my 2.5 Alfetta GTV was that and my Berlina the most loved. But, it is only it's only its weight that lets it down. In every other respect, it is the least Alfa - like Alfa I have owned and that is not a bad thing.

The Autodelta Cat - Free Manifolds are another revelation. Reputedly they recover about 8 bhp of losses. But, I don't think one can judge them in isolation because, when one takes into account the Colombo Bariani Camshafts, they greatly assist gas flow and the combination of them both has resulted in the oil temperature dropping like a stone. The oil temperature gauge - sensor in the sump - the wrong place really - now barely moves, if at all, sitting firmly at 70 deg.C, the lowest figure on the gauge. The oil remains pretty much translucent and whereas I hitherto would have topped up with at least 1 - 1.5 litres of oil, the level has remained unchanged.

As for the Colombo Bariani Camshafts. Well frankly, they are stunning! I believe the manifolds contribute most to the upper cylinder/ cylinder head temperature drop, but as the valve timing has changed to 23.5 degrees positive valve overlap, they work wonderfully together.

With the original Alfa cams, the negative valve overlap contributed at least three negatives to the engine:-

1.) At the the start of an induction stroke the inlet valve is closed and thus at low revs/pulling away there is a delay in getting the air moving into the cylinders.

2.) There is no cross - flow from inlet to exhaust, which means induction air is not used to cool the valves, piston crowns or cylinder heads. This is particularly important when one has just com off high speed cruising and dropped down to urban speeds, where vvt action rotates the timing back to virtual static positions, especially the exhaust camshaft which has extremely strong internal spring bias forcing it to fully advance. And inhibiting heat from being dissipated!

3.) The Colombo Bariani timing angles ensure there is always a Positive Valve Overlap at any point from Tick - Over, to maximum revs, so air is always on the move through the inlet tract. Thus, the gas flow characteristics are much more linear and in conjunction with the manifolds, torque is much stronger - right across the range. I say this before I have even had a chance to get the car dynamometer tested again, but it is a safe assumption as the whole point of the vvt's is to optimize torque across the board.

They are brilliant camshafts. The engine sounds like a sewing machine, completely devoid of any "Metallic Tinkle" if you understand what I mean. An indication of how effective they are at the bottom end, my son bought me a Piper - Cross filter but I never got the chance to fit it. However, what was fitted was a good K & N filter. The two were swapped and I could not believe the difference. around town, it is so sedate - like a Rolls Royce. Obviously the Piper - Cross is allowing better air flow, assisting the performance of both the C.B. Camshafts and the Autodelta Manifolds.

The engine is tremendously flexible at traffic speeds, below 2500 rpm, where the drone from the exhaust is most prominent. It doesn't appear to affect the performance, but it's not pleasant. However, by 2600 rpm the drone is quickly starting to fade until by 2800 and beyond, when the engine becomes so quiet; revs piling on so silkily. The car completely belies its weight now. It has to be over 300 bhp - comfortably. I get quite a kick out of sitting in traffic at 30 - 35 mph, it really is classy. But then again, when I get the opportunity, just to push the metal to the floor, ones focus sharpens up the as the car piles on speed and I need to concentrate more. It is very stable but I am conscious that the brakes probably aren't good enough now.

With regard to my oil pressure. When the engine was being tested, after fitting, 10 bar was recorded at the horseshoe of the CLLS admittedly with cold oil. The output from the oil pump had been relieved by sculpting the short right hand section from the pump, through the block and to the oil cooler/filter unit, so that must have relieved a fair bit of back - pressure on the pump. However, Mace have been selling up - rated oil pumps for Holdens. And I did buy my new pump off the internet. So, although Alfa quote 4 - 6 bar I think that figure may well be because, a: the pump has a lower value pressure relief valve, and b: the block restrictions, including the one immediately at the output of the oil pump, were prematurely causing it to relieve pressure at a lower value. Plus, the pump I bought may just be one of those mace have been selling.

Anyhow, I hope this finds you well and the 159 is continuing to perform. Once I get my Dynamometer results, I will copy you. The next modification is to the Lambda probes. I am hoping to be able to adjust the figure to improve the economy further, without the need to pay for software modifications. You know how I feel about that. The mod will be quite simple and should allow, if my theory is correct, the AFR to be optimized from the cabin, for rich or lean. But really, I suppose, I am just looking to see if I can squeeze a little more power from the engine.

Would I my mods again? Damned right I would - at the drop of a hat! It isn't possible to describe the changes the Manifolds and the Camshafts have made to the engine. I don't think either would be really worth it without my oil - way modifications, because, they improve the dynamic response of the engine. But in conjunction with the mods, the manifolds and cams are an absolute must. I really feel I now have a genuine Alfa Romeo engine.

Kind Regards,


Finally, as my Lambda reading is 7.004: AFR 14.7588 and the tolerance is 0.97 - 1.030: AFR 14.25 - 15.41, I do not intend to modify my Lambda probes. I still have not had a long enough run with the Q4, but it seems like the cost of the extra performance is a increase in petrol consumption. It is about mid twenties at the moment, but I have been a bit over - enthusiastic with the throttle, whilst not stretching the revs too much. I am really pleased with the way the engine temperature has come down and slightly over - rich mixtures; particularly with high compression ratios is beneficial to piston/ring/bore seal, aiding volumetric efficiency - or so I am informed.

The remaining issue is the central twin cat and the "Clarinet Reed". I have found a local exhaust specialist who will modify it for me in a couple of weeks.

Lastly, although I had the rear nearside wheel bearing changed, which sorted that problem out, I don't now think I can entirely blame the tyres for all the road noise. So in the coming weeks/months, I intend to have the remaining wheel bearings replaced. Alloy cam covers have yet to be fitted, but once these jobs are completed, it will be down to cosmetics - making her look beautiful, as opposed to just pretty. I will also look to spend a bit of money on chassis bracing and a change of springs and shock absorbers.

Beyond this, just enjoy the car!
 

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Re, your oil temperature - are you certain that the gauge is working? I know there were several threads regarding non operation of the gauge. Mine does work and indicates around 100°C when the engine is fully heated.
 

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Discussion Starter #189
Re, your oil temperature - are you certain that the gauge is working? I know there were several threads regarding non operation of the gauge. Mine does work and indicates around 100°C when the engine is fully heated.
There is just a hint of movement from 70 deg. C., which is as low as the scale goes.

I did not check it, when the engine was being rebuilt, but it was working ok before the engine came out of the Brera.

However, it does tally with what David Cironi found when he replaced the standard exhaust system with a super sprint set-up on the 147 GTA, in the clip below.


You need to follow the subtitles for the absolute detail - unless you are fluent in Italian. It includes a lovely tribute to Busso as well.

However, accepted the weather is cold, the under bonnet temperatures have dropped dramatically.

The GTA Busso, is crucified by the manifold cats.

Aside from the Autodelta manifolds carrying the heat away now, the Colombo Bariani camshafts have introduced a period of 23.5 degrees, (0.5 deg. Before TDC to 23 deg. After TDC) Positive Valve Overlap. A period when inlet air can pass out of the exhaust valves.

This is not the case with the standard Alfa camshafts!

The Busso too has PVO, which contributes along with super sprint manifolds in reducing temperatures.

If the Busso had the 3.2 JTS’s standard valve timing - no VVT - it would probably melt.
 

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I was looking at the pair of 159/Brera V6 exhaust manifolds today, and they are not even a patch on the manifold cats the Busso was fitted with. The 159/Breras will probably see an even greater improvement from removing the manifold cats than the Busso does.
 

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Discussion Starter #191
Oil remains translucent and seems to retain more viscosity after a forty minute run to Cambridge.

The engine certainly appears quieter on tick - over. The most obvious difference is the lack of any “metallic” edge to the acoustics - I fail to find an expression to describe it other than sewing machine - like. Or possibly Hornby Locomotive - like.
 

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Discussion Starter #195 (Edited)
Just Stock Alfa Recommended. Our positions are somewhat different and if 10w50 serves you well on the track then OK. The extra viscosity - if that is the term - will help your engine, given it probably has some bearing wear. Mine has just been run - in, after a full rebuild and I need to establish how my changes have affected the car, So it makes sense to stick with the status quo.

I have to say, I have not had a convincing argument for any changes of oil. I appreciate how important it is for you, given what you do with your car. But I am still getting my head around the changes I have made to mine and my safest bet is to stay with what Alfa recommend for this engine from new - which essentially mine is. Only the rings remain unchanged.

Have you managed to get your Alloy Covers on yet. I have the same problem with my new front cover as you, so I was going to Tap - out the two offending holes and insert some threaded stud and liquid metal fix them in place. Then file them flat and re - tap to the correct position.

The rear one fits perfect. But the breather pipe comes from the end and I do not know what the fitting actually looks like - is it just a coupling for the pipe, or is there a valve in it? If it is just a fitting for the pipe, I can get one machined up.

But that is the last of my problems. They will look nice when fitted though, and the alloy should help keep the heat down further around the valve gear and cams. Plus, they are higher profile, so vapour will have a better chance of being shifted. I am hoping there is now less oil vapour than hitherto, because the engine is now a lot less hot.

While doing some research, I came across an article covering the clearances for engine used for competition. So the fact that your engine has a few miles of wear on the bearings, is only bringing them into the territory where "Slack" would be built into the bearing clearances deliberately.

This being the case, you are possibly; and it is only my logic that leads me to this conclusion, doing your engine a favour by increasing the viscosity of the oil. The 10 being the "Base Viscosity" and the 50 being the additives. Meaning, as the additives deteriorate, the base viscosity of 10, lends better protection than 5. But that is only opinion and I think you are best to research racing circles for more detailed understanding.
 

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Just Stock Alfa Recommended. Our positions are somewhat different and if 10w50 serves you well on the track then OK. The extra viscosity - if that is the term - will help your engine, given it probably has some bearing wear. Mine has just been run - in, after a full rebuild and I need to establish how my changes have affected the car, So it makes sense to stick with the status quo.

I have to say, I have not had a convincing argument for any changes of oil. I appreciate how important it is for you, given what you do with your car. But I am still getting my head around the changes I have made to mine and my safest bet is to stay with what Alfa recommend for this engine from new - which essentially mine is. Only the rings remain unchanged.

Have you managed to get your Alloy Covers on yet. I have the same problem with my new front cover as you, so I was going to Tap - out the two offending holes and insert some threaded stud and liquid metal fix them in place. Then file them flat and re - tap to the correct position.

The rear one fits perfect. But the breather pipe comes from the end and I do not know what the fitting actually looks like - is it just a coupling for the pipe, or is there a valve in it? If it is just a fitting for the pipe, I can get one machined up.

But that is the last of my problems. They will look nice when fitted though, and the alloy should help keep the heat down further around the valve gear and cams. Plus, they are higher profile, so vapour will have a better chance of being shifted. I am hoping there is now less oil vapour than hitherto, because the engine is now a lot less hot.

While doing some research, I came across an article covering the clearances for engine used for competition. So the fact that your engine has a few miles of wear on the bearings, is only bringing them into the territory where "Slack" would be built into the bearing clearances deliberately.

This being the case, you are possibly; and it is only my logic that leads me to this conclusion, doing your engine a favour by increasing the viscosity of the oil. The 10 being the "Base Viscosity" and the 50 being the additives. Meaning, as the additives deteriorate, the base viscosity of 10, lends better protection than 5. But that is only opinion and I think you are best to research racing circles for more detailed understanding.

The main reason for changing to the 10w50 was that on start up i am getting a whisper of colour in the exhaust gasses and I have been advised that it is down to the viscosity of the oil and by going to 10w from 5w will help to reduce this additional oil consumption as it does like to burn through it

Also, on track I have noticed that the oil temperature does like to creep up, so I like idea of w50 vs w40 to cope with the increased thermal changes in the oil

I have the rear alloy manifold cover fitted and it works absolutely fine and haven't had any adverse side affects of installing it - have you got a picture of your breather and what you plan on doing ot yours/or the issue you have with yours? The manifold just had the coupler from the manifold and i just refitted my breather pipe to this and haven't had any issues

Unfortunately I haven't come up with a solution yet for the front manifold and have refitted the original as I cant see any easy solution to fix this as i believe this is where alfa have had their design input on the front right so it doesn't match the GM design

Mileage is on 138k but no signs of any performance loss or issues, chains were done at 109k in 2016 - only issue is this slight puff of smoke on gear changes under heavy acceleration and when revving on a cold start - main reason for wanting to look at different oil is the oil consumption - in 8,000miles of hard driving it drank over 2.5litres of top up (I do run the oil over the max to avoid sump pickup starvation)
 

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Discussion Starter #197
I'll do some pictures. Do you not think, it is more likely to be valve seals/guides causing smoke on start up? I know with the Brera engine and now the 159 engine, which just came out, it was difficult to believe they didn't leak oil through to the inlet or exhaust manifold.

Can see the logic behind the blow - by; with thicker oil theoretically it would less likely to get past the scraper rings. But it is a High Compression Ratio engine, so you won't stop blow - by and it is just as likely to vapourize 10w50 as it is 5w40. We are talking very high temperatures in that region!

My sump - work gained me a bit of lattitude as I lowered the pick - up and the baffles channel oil past its face. The dash screen oil level indication works brilliantly now. There is no excuse now for not knowing what the oil level is and about half a litre is represented by two bars on the dash. It never worked before, always indicating full. Mind you, there was so much crud on it, it is hardly surprising.

I have a twin cat module, spare. And I was going to have it modified to illiminate the Clarinet Reed, but whoever removed it, bent the coupling for the two front flexi's and the exhaust guy suggests it will be a pig to get a good seal and may affect the Lambda readings. So I am now looking for another one in half decent condition. Otherwise I may cut the two cats out and have them refitted to a bespoke module, perhaps lengthening it a little, and moving the central box further back - maybe six to nine inches.

Whatever, that blasted drone is so annoying. It brings me back to ground with a thump. The performance either side of 2500 rpm is so delightful, Yet when it slips back to that spot, it ruins the whole experience. Like going from a Ferrari to a Massey Ferguson.
 

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I'll do some pictures. Do you not think, it is more likely to be valve seals/guides causing smoke on start up? I know with the Brera engine and now the 159 engine, which just came out, it was difficult to believe they didn't leak oil through to the inlet or exhaust manifold.

Can see the logic behind the blow - by; with thicker oil theoretically it would less likely to get past the scraper rings. But it is a High Compression Ratio engine, so you won't stop blow - by and it is just as likely to vapourize 10w50 as it is 5w40. We are talking very high temperatures in that region!

My sump - work gained me a bit of lattitude as I lowered the pick - up and the baffles channel oil past its face. The dash screen oil level indication works brilliantly now. There is no excuse now for not knowing what the oil level is and about half a litre is represented by two bars on the dash. It never worked before, always indicating full. Mind you, there was so much crud on it, it is hardly surprising.

I have a twin cat module, spare. And I was going to have it modified to illiminate the Clarinet Reed, but whoever removed it, bent the coupling for the two front flexi's and the exhaust guy suggests it will be a pig to get a good seal and may affect the Lambda readings. So I am now looking for another one in half decent condition. Otherwise I may cut the two cats out and have them refitted to a bespoke module, perhaps lengthening it a little, and moving the central box further back - maybe six to nine inches.

Whatever, that blasted drone is so annoying. It brings me back to ground with a thump. The performance either side of 2500 rpm is so delightful, Yet when it slips back to that spot, it ruins the whole experience. Like going from a Ferrari to a Massey Ferguson.
I had posted about it a few months ago here - 3.2 Brera V6 Valve Seal Replacement Advice

I think it could possibly be the valve seals but I have been told that by changing the oil will help to solve the issue - it is only for a second on start up and not all the time so I don't think its anything major to be concerned about - I've seen far worse! haha

I purely rely on the dipstick as my dash reading did used to work but it always reads one less bar now even when i know the oil is full

I am going to tax my car in march now as cant afford to do it in feb, im based in worcester but it would be good for you to have a look at what ive done to my mid cats
 

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Discussion Starter #199
You posted a picture - you took them out I believe. Sadly, I need them as the man - cats have gone and I still need to be street legal.
 
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