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As stupid as it sounds check the spark plugs are all tight.

I had one making a similar noise just before a plug managed to eject itself from the head.

5w30 oil is too thin, especially if it is a low HTHS spec such as Ford. A good quality 5w40 fully synthetic is what I have used in the past (over many thousands of miles) and they run very well on it. A 10w40 Semi will also be fine, but probably won't be all that much cheaper than the fully synthetic.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
If a really thorough oil change is done, it will use all of the 5 litres when changing the filter also.
Sump capacity is rated at 4.4 litres.
I'd change the filter also.
Ensure the oil is decent and it is a good quality oil filter. I wouldn't try to get the best as I don't like the sound of your engine. I don't know if this is easily fixable but I hope so.
Synthetic oil? That one is too complex to answer properly here. 5w/40 Shell Helix Ultra would be a very good oil to use. It is synthetic in that it is made from methane gas but not synthetic in that it is not a bona fide group 4 PAO or group 5 ester based oil. It seems to perform very close to quality group 4 PAO oil by judging it on post use oil analysis.
Shell is known to be a top performer when it comes to engine cleanliness. A flush should be unnecessary but check drained oil for any particle matter.

Does the noise go away after 2000rpm?
If so, before doing anything else I think taking a look under the cam cover would be a good idea. I'd want to see if anything looks damaged, badly worn or even bolts which have come undone or sheared (just to be sure).
What's the difference between the 5w40 and 5w30 ?

I have had a look under the cam cover, that's actually the second thing I did after checking the oil levels, all seems to be okay to my eye lol I'm not sure how okay it is but it seems to be fine cams doesn't have excessive wear, I did try to see if there's any indication of wear or maybe a stuck hydraulic lifter/s, well couldn't see much there as it did look fine to me. So I guess I'll do this oil change first and then drive her for a bit and if that doesn't quieten the noise down then I'd probably tackle the variator and the hydraulic lifters,
 

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"What's the difference between the 5w40 and 5w30 ?"

In these cases the first number (i.e. the '5' ) relates to the oil viscosity (flowiness, i.e. its' 'weight') at a specified lower temperature. The second number (i.e. the '30' or '40' with these oils) relates to the viscosity at a specified higher temperature. The fundamental difference between a 5W-30 and a 5W-40 is that both oils will flow as freely as each other at a specific lower temperature (i.e. the 5 number), but as the temperature rises the 5W-40 will thin out less than the 5W-30.

Read this page:
The sections on viscosity grades should answer your question.

Regards,
John.
 

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It isn't possible to judge the health of a 'lifter' by looking at it. Inside the tappet / lifter (of the hydraulic type) is a void that is filled by pressurised oil while the engine is running. The oil pressure forces the lifter to expand until the clearance between the cam face and the tappet face reduces to zero (i.e. the dynamic valve clearance becomes zero). If the pressure inside the tappet is too low then the tappet won't expand strongly enough to maintain a zero dynamic valve clearance, and the tappet will become 'clattery'.

Hydraulic tappets don't have any oil seals to maintain the necessary pressure inside the internal void. They simply rely upon closely machined tolerances between their moving parts to prevent pressurised oil from leaking out too quickly. A worn tappet will leak more oil (from looser tolerances between their parts), so may not be able to maintain the necessary internal oil pressure to maintain a zero dynamic valve clearance. This will be exacerbated if the oil is thinner, and a tappet that is noisy when filled with a thinner oil (i.e. runs with an excessive dynamic valve clearance) may well be quiet when filled with a thicker oil because it is harder for the thicker oil to leak out as quickly, so, internal pressure loss decreases, dynamic valve clearance reduces to zero, and the tappet becomes quiet.

Not only does the tappet need to not leak oil excessively (it will always leak some), we also require that the basic oil pressure (i.e. 'feed' pressure from the oil pump) being pumped into the tappet must be adequately high. This is less of an issue if the tappet is in good condition (tight tolerances between tappet parts), but probably becomes more so if the tappet is significantly worn. If the tappet is in good condition then it loses internal pressure relatively slowly, and the feed pressure doesn't need to be particularly high. But, if the tappet is worn then it may lose pressure quite fast, and in this case it would be increasingly important that the feed pressure remains above X psi.

With a worn tappet, if the feed pressure is low enough then the internal tappet pressure may fall below what is needed to prevent the dynamic valve clearance from opening up. The thinner the engine oil, the lower the oil pressure is likely to be, especially as oil temperature increases (e.g. a 5W-30 relative to a 5W-40, or thicker, where the 5W-30 will thin out more with rising temperature). So, if we are using a thinner oil, then it becomes more likely that a worn tappet will become noisy both because the tappet leaks more and because the general engine oil pressure will be less...

Maintaining a social distance,
John.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Oh damn I've picked up an even bigger problem, just took the car out off the yard drove about 2ks and then the red light came on on the Rev counter next to the redlines on the Rev counter then the car just lost compression Rev counter dropped and car died, tried starting again and it sounds as if a dead battery kind of swing. Got the car towed back home and now I got no clue what to do next or what could have gave up now...
 

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The cambelt can break or it is possible that teeth become stripped from the belt. To check this, the front right wheel should be removed. Then remove the small plastic splash shield above the driveshaft. Remove the auxiliary drive belt using a 15mm spanner. Remove the engine timing belt shield and have a look to see if it is broken of teeth seen stripped. At that point, turn the crankshaft (easier with a 1.6 or 1.8) and ensure the crankshaft also turns both camshaft pulleys. Ensure the pulley for the coolant pump is also nicely aligned with the other pulleys.

Hopefully it is not the cambelt as your specialist will have changed the belt, pulleys and tensioner at 36k miles.
 

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Gents. Please stick to the problem at hand
Sorry, but I have to say I dont think it's relevant to consider the cambelt. Personally I'm sure If the cambelt was broken, the engine would break down immediately
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The cambelt can break or it is possible that teeth become stripped from the belt. To check this, the front right wheel should be removed. Then remove the small plastic splash shield above the driveshaft. Remove the auxiliary drive belt using a 15mm spanner. Remove the engine timing belt shield and have a look to see if it is broken of teeth seen stripped. At that point, turn the crankshaft (easier with a 1.6 or 1.8) and ensure the crankshaft also turns both camshaft pulleys. Ensure the pulley for the coolant pump is also nicely aligned with the other pulleys.

Hopefully it is not the cambelt as your specialist will have changed the belt, pulleys and tensioner at 36k miles.
Thanks buddy...
Going to have a go at that now, will remove the rocker cover aswell to see if anything has come undone as theres like a metal kind of noise when I crank the car, hoping something just came lose and retightening it fixes the problem... will update once I've done this...
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Gents. Please stick to the problem at hand
Sorry, but I have to say I dont think it's relevant to consider the cambelt. Personally I'm sure If the cambelt was broken, the engine would break down immediately
Not sure if you read this buddy... But this here is the newest problem as of yesterday...

"Oh damn I've picked up an even bigger problem, just took the car out off the yard drove about 2ks and then the red light came on on the Rev counter next to the redlines on the Rev counter then the car just lost compression Rev counter dropped and car died, tried starting again and it sounds as if a dead battery kind of swing. Got the car towed back home and now I got no clue what to do next or what could have gave up now..."

Well yeah this is the major issue at hand presently...
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Did th
The cambelt can break or it is possible that teeth become stripped from the belt. To check this, the front right wheel should be removed. Then remove the small plastic splash shield above the driveshaft. Remove the auxiliary drive belt using a 15mm spanner. Remove the engine timing belt shield and have a look to see if it is broken of teeth seen stripped. At that point, turn the crankshaft (easier with a 1.6 or 1.8) and ensure the crankshaft also turns both camshaft pulleys. Ensure the pulley for the coolant pump is also nicely aligned with the other pulleys.

Hopefully it is not the cambelt as your specialist will have changed the belt, pulleys and tensioner at 36k miles.
Did this now, but didn't do it by turning the crankshaft I used the exhaust camshaft (the cam without the variator) to turn the engine as it was a lot more accessible and easier to get to, belts still on just cambelt looked a little looser than usual between the 2 cams but that's retighten now so all seems fine there engine is turning as normal, do I have to use the crankshaft to turn the engine to test this? Cause when I turn the engine over everything looks fine besides just the 1 hydraulic I've noticed thats the second 1 from your left (the camshaft without the variator) isn't coming back up no matter how many times I turn the engine over... I can lift the hydraulic lifter up a bit after the cam passes it but it goes back down and only comes up when I put both my fingers in there somehow and lift it up... Your thoughts on this....

Whats the next step???
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Any help now for the way forward would be great....

Should I put the valve cover back on and try starting her up and see if I've still a starting problem???
 

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Discussion Starter #35
This is the update right now.... It's still just cranking and there's a ticking kinda noise coming from somewhere...

Any thoughts on that guys?

 

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Discussion Starter #36
This is the update right now.... It's still just cranking and there's a ticking kinda noise coming from somewhere...

Any thoughts on that guys?


Okay update, that loud clicking noise is a broken cambelt tensioner, I've been suspecting hydraulics all this while to be making this noise but it's actually the damn cambelt tensioner, need to get a new 1 then try and see how she sounds when she's started... Will update further once I've gotten the new tensioner fitted...


Thanks again guys for all the much needed info...
 

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If one of the hydraulic cam follower buckets isn't coming back up by itself, it sounds like a bent valve. If the cam timing was out due to the damaged tensioner, it may be possible the cam timing went out just enough to damage an exhaust valve. Of course, there is another less major possibility which is that the inside of that hydraulic cam follower is mince. If not seen that happen but I guess it is a possibility. You would have to remove the exhaust camshaft to see if the valve itself is too low or it is just the follower. I hope it is the latter as it would save having to remove the cylinder head.

If it is the valve, I'd carefully check all the exhaust valves (the exhaust camshaft may be able to have greater fluctuating timing in even of a loose belt, I think). If it is a bent valve, the engine would have a pronounced misfire. It wasn't clear if the car has a misfire but as the engine didn't shake around, you may just be very fortunate in that respect.
BTW, looking at your engine top mounting rod, it looks like you have a 2.0 litre. Correct?
 

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As per Fruity, if a tappet is not coming back up then I think the underlying valve is not unlikely to be badly bent. I would perform a compression test of all four cylinders next, because other valves may also be bent, not so much as to prevent their tappet from coming back up, but possibly enough to lose compression (to my ear it sounds like there may be no compression in any of the cylinders).

A bent valve means that at least that valve needs to be replaced, which means the head has to come off. I wouldn't waste my time fitting a new tensioner at this point, not until I knew whether or not the head had to come off.

Regards,
John.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
If one of the hydraulic cam follower buckets isn't coming back up by itself, it sounds like a bent valve. If the cam timing was out due to the damaged tensioner, it may be possible the cam timing went out just enough to damage an exhaust valve. Of course, there is another less major possibility which is that the inside of that hydraulic cam follower is mince. If not seen that happen but I guess it is a possibility. You would have to remove the exhaust camshaft to see if the valve itself is too low or it is just the follower. I hope it is the latter as it would save having to remove the cylinder head.

If it is the valve, I'd carefully check all the exhaust valves (the exhaust camshaft may be able to have greater fluctuating timing in even of a loose belt, I think). If it is a bent valve, the engine would have a pronounced misfire. It wasn't clear if the car has a misfire but as the engine didn't shake around, you may just be very fortunate in that respect.
BTW, looking at your engine top mounting rod, it looks like you have a 2.0 litre. Correct?
Thanks Fruity... I'm just hoping it's the hydraulic that needs to be changed, cause when I turned the engine over I watched each hydraulic coming up properly as the cam passes and goes back down as the cam point presses on its just the 1 hydraulic that isn't coming back up, and as the cam point passed it I managed to fit in my fingers and lift it back up and after a few seconds it goes back down on its own so I think that 1 specific hydraulic is shot, however when I do turn the engine over from the cam everything turns fine and at a certain point you hear the engine makes a sound of releasing compressed air when it hits the correct timing marks so that means there is compression right?

You are right it's a 2.0 TS
 

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Discussion Starter #40
As per Fruity, if a tappet is not coming back up then I think the underlying valve is not unlikely to be badly bent. I would perform a compression test of all four cylinders next, because other valves may also be bent, not so much as to prevent their tappet from coming back up, but possibly enough to lose compression (to my ear it sounds like there may be no compression in any of the cylinders).

A bent valve means that at least that valve needs to be replaced, which means the head has to come off. I wouldn't waste my time fitting a new tensioner at this point, not until I knew whether or not the head had to come off.

Regards,
John.
Is there any way to do a compression test without any specific tools?? However as I've mentioned to Fruity, when I manually turn the engine over it makes a sound of releasing compressed air, doesn't that mean there is compression ?
 
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