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If I get any suspicious calls asking for me, I ask who they are and where they got my number because it is a secure Government line and I need to take all their details to report them. 100% hang up rate :thumbs:
 

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Knock at my door last night around 9pm:-

Bloke: You'll probably tell me you are not interested, I'm from N-Power
Elfred: I'm not interested
Bloke: OK but before I go I need your details for my form
Elfred: You do not need my details, goodbye

:rant:

Anyway just in case you have never heard this one it's worth it! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY12cNe2xf0
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Knock at my door last night around 9pm:-

Bloke: You'll probably tell me you are not interested, I'm from N-Power
Elfred: I'm not interested
Bloke: OK but before I go I need your details for my form
Elfred: You do not need my details, goodbye

:rant:

Anyway just in case you have never heard this one it's worth it! YouTube - Greatest Prank Call Ever - Crime Scene Caller



Thats excellent :lol:
 

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ok, here goes.

Increasingly, banks use something called automated outbound resolution calls to contact customers for two reasons:

1) either you're late making a credit card repayment
2) your credit/debit card has conducted a transaction that's out of synch with your typical buying patterns, so to protect you, they're worried that your card details have been cloned/scammed, and they want to double check it really was you who bought ten kilos of gems worth £98,000 in Morocco :)

Auto resolution means you press a couple of buttons to pay a bill, or verify whether it really was you who conducted a transaction (it's either deal with the call, or have your cards blocked; what would you prefer?)

Most UK banks use it. OK, so you may ask...'when my bank calls me, i want to speak to a human'. It's not possible; the number of people making late payments or, sadly, having their credit/debit cards used fraudulently, far eclipses the number of call centre agents available to alert customers to what's happened.

Auto reso - get used to it :)
 

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ok, here goes.

Increasingly, banks use something called automated outbound resolution calls to contact customers for two reasons:

1) either you're late making a credit card repayment
2) your credit/debit card has conducted a transaction that's out of synch with your typical buying patterns, so to protect you, they're worried that your card details have been cloned/scammed, and they want to double check it really was you who bought ten kilos of gems worth £98,000 in Morocco :)

Auto resolution means you press a couple of buttons to pay a bill, or verify whether it really was you who conducted a transaction (it's either deal with the call, or have your cards blocked; what would you prefer?)

Most UK banks use it. OK, so you may ask...'when my bank calls me, i want to speak to a human'. It's not possible; the number of people making late payments or, sadly, having their credit/debit cards used fraudulently, far eclipses the number of call centre agents available to alert customers to what's happened.

Auto reso - get used to it :)

I understand the priciple involved g but ........ they do no more to identify themselves
than to say 'This is Barclays Bank' for example. Well I am Winston Churchill in that case.

They need to come up with some way of communicating to you that they are who they
say they are rather than leaving it for you to validate your identity.

Otherwise you may be leaving yourself in a position where you have handed out the one
piece of information a fraudulent person may be requiring to complete a transaction that
will leave you in debt.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
ok, here goes.

Increasingly, banks use something called automated outbound resolution calls to contact customers for two reasons:

1) either you're late making a credit card repayment
2) your credit/debit card has conducted a transaction that's out of synch with your typical buying patterns, so to protect you, they're worried that your card details have been cloned/scammed, and they want to double check it really was you who bought ten kilos of gems worth £98,000 in Morocco :)

Auto resolution means you press a couple of buttons to pay a bill, or verify whether it really was you who conducted a transaction (it's either deal with the call, or have your cards blocked; what would you prefer?)

Most UK banks use it. OK, so you may ask...'when my bank calls me, i want to speak to a human'. It's not possible; the number of people making late payments or, sadly, having their credit/debit cards used fraudulently, far eclipses the number of call centre agents available to alert customers to what's happened.

Auto reso - get used to it :)

Yup was late making a payment, like every month.

Is it going to kill them to wait for a reasonable hour?
 

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I understand the priciple involved g but ........ they do no more to identify themselves
than to say 'This is Barclays Bank' for example. Well I am Winston Churchill in that case.

They need to come up with some way of communicating to you that they are who they
say they are rather than leaving it for you to validate your identity.

Otherwise you may be leaving yourself in a position where you have handed out the one
piece of information a fraudulent person may be requiring to complete a transaction that
will leave you in debt.
Gibbo, i agree with you 100%; the flaw the system has, is it makes you suspicious of it, even though it's (legitimately) altering you to a suspicion it has about activity on your account. Auto reso services only ask you to validate one detail - either your post-code, or date of birth, before proceeding. They will never ask for an account number, or sort-code, or card security number.

So let's take our £98k gem example - the system will call you, and once it has validated that you are the customer, it'll ask: 'have you just bought £98k of gems from Gem Emporium'? When you press 2 for no, it'll immediately put you though to a real agent at your bank's fraud department to cancel that transaction.

Of course, if call recipients remain suspicious of these calls, the best thing to do is call your bank on the number that you use and know to be safe, and verify if they have legitimately tried to contact you about a transaction that has concerned them.

To put these system's efficiency into context...three years ago, £800 came out of my current account after my card was cloned; it wasn't until i received my statement three weeks later that i noticed the theft. It then took a further eight weeks to get the money back.

So...an immediate alert to a fraudulent activity v waiting until you notice the loss?

Snow Angel - the systems typically put in calls at various hours. If they determine that you don't ever answer between 9am and 5pm, they'll assume you're at work, and call in the evening. If they can't call you between 10pm and 6am at the weekend, they think you're a hard core clubber :), and will try at 12pm (when you're at the after party)
 

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Never ever give sensitive details that could be used for identity theft to incoming phonecalls (in the absence of some way of authenticating the caller), only when you have made the call to an officially obtained number and thus have an "authenticated communication channel.
It really could be anybody at the other end of the phone.

Hopefully it is unlikely that any bank is doing this, but it shows a staggering level of incompetance if they think that is an acceptable protocol.
 

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As a security architect I can assure you that giving sensitive information to "anybody" does not protect "you". There may be some clueless moronic layer of bureacracy that is unaware of the basics of information security that thinks it does but they will soon come around when either:

a) They wonder why the clients accounts they are protecting with this idiotic measure are suddenly suffering increased levels of identity theft..

Or

b) Some sensible safeguards are established by either legislation or finally and belatedly the self protecting interest of banks kicks in.


For such a protocol to make sense, the customer should have a system of authenticating the requester by either having a list of official challenges on a previously issued card, just like many phone banking attend use to authenticate "us", or indeed an invitation to ring back on a freephone number with a call routing ref number.
..or any other system that has a modicum of common sense!


 

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Got to agree with Trailbraker, I get phoned up every few months or so by a 3rd party marketing firm that working for vodaphone. They have the authentication codes for my account and are legit but they really cannot seem to grasp that ringing me up and asking for my postcode, DoB and PIN number is the dumbest thing ever.

Got to love argueing with them about the intellegence of their actions.

GK
 

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selling you something, or warning you of a potential fraud, is quite different.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Can I just ask what time of the day would you phone somebody who owed you money?
No later than 7pm.
Is that unreasonable?
I think Its a decent time.
The bugger who rang know full well we are here during the day seeing as Mr S does not have a job and thats why we owe the money in the first place.
 
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