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Discussion Starter #1
I love being on the sea but, being raised a city boy, I know eff-all about it. Looking on-line (I'm not just looking at car pr0n) you can pick up something like a Shetland sea cruiser for next to nothing with a trailer to boot, supposedly good for up to three miles offshore. Again, looking on-line, it seems that the inland waterways are tightly regulated but you can pretty much do what you like on the ocean as long as you wear a floatation device. Is that right? Do you need a license? A radio? A radio license? Flares? Drainpipes? Harpoon?

How much of a death-wish do I have?
 

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You need **** all, although its wise to get a bit of hands on experience with a person into boats from the area.
At least that way, you'll learn about tides, where the channel is, markers for bringing a boat in, important knots etc.
As far as I know you don't need to have done a course on radios (I've talked to Malin head plenty of times and haven't done a course), but you do need a licence for the radio.
You'll definitely need a radio, mobile phones don't work for ****e once you're half a mile or less of shore.
You'd need rope, an anchor as well. You'd need a trailer licence to tow said boat.
You'll also need a life jacket and a spare kill chord. An auxillary engine can be handy as well.
Not to mention fenders, strong rope, a boat hook to name but a few things.

I spent my summers on an Orkney 590 of Achill, great boat and comfortable in most swells save for an Atlantic storm.
A decent boat that you might be able to get for ok money is a warrior.

But id definitely do a powerboat course that is accredited by the irish sailing association first before buying a boat.

I take it a few of your neighbours down in west cork have boats (if its anything like achill they do)
 

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I think it's quite the same - stock up on some safety kit and don't be a nob.

I can do the former, it's the second bit I need to work on.
All you have to do is have a lifejacket on board and make sure that all under 16 wear them and only over 16 operates the boat (that rule wasn't applied to us from about the age of 8:smoker:)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the info matey boy. Most of that I had figured apart from the need for a trailer licence. I wonder how many people around here who shift livestock (as well as boats) actually have the BE category.
 

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Sorry PoP, and thanks.

Basically I did have a bit of experience with a Broom Seamaster which I think was a 36footer, and it did have twin Volvo Penta marine diesel engines good for about 22 knots iirc?

Davits on the stern carried a Dory cathedral hulled which had in built floatation.

Anyway like yourself I had the yen to get either a Micro Explorer,(that name may be incorrect :confused:) or a Shetland, such was my enthusiasm at that time.

I'm sure where you are located there is a good selection of small power boats so do gives us a shout if you settle for something to potter around off shore with?:):
 

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Sorry PoP, and thanks.

Basically I did have a bit of experience with a Broom Seamaster which I think was a 36footer, and it did have twin Volvo Pentax marine diesel engines good for about 22 knots iirc?

Davits on the stern carried a Dory cathedral hulled which had in built floatation.

Anyway like yourself I had the yen to get either a Micro Explorer,(that name may be incorrect :confused:) or a Shetland, such was my enthusiasm at that time.

I'm sure where you are located there is a good selection of small power boats so do gives us a shout if you settle for something to potter around off shore with?:):
A Seamaster would be veeeery nice. :thumbs:

It seems a shame to be so near the sea and not to be on it sometimes. I'd also like my boy to experience it.

Scortho is right - I need to get some hands-on. There are some friendly part-time neighbours with a cruiser who have offered to take us out. Perhaps it's time to see if they really meant it or not!

And then it's down to the man-maths, as Mufasa would say.
 

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A Seamaster would be veeeery nice. :thumbs:

It seems a shame to be so near the sea and not to be on it sometimes. I'd also like my boy to experience it.

Scortho is right - I need to get some hands-on. There are some friendly part-time neighbours with a cruiser who have offered to take us out. Perhaps it's time to see if they really meant it or not!

And then it's down to the man-maths, as Mufasa would say.
Oh and although you mightn't think it now....its better for you in the long run if your missus has a pair of sea legs
 

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Provided the boat is obviously sound, like not having rot between the transom laminations, then a good starter boat could well be a Shetland such as the famous 535. They can be had at quite modest prices. Something a bit larger such as their 570 or maybe a Family Four could also suit. Some Shetlands are double skinned with a layer of foam between the hull mouldings. It is not uncommon, in some boats, to have water absorption due to skin fittings or window trim failing. Have a look on the Shetland Owners sites, there are two.

The correct boat depends on what you intend to use it for so choose accordingly and make sure that the engine, especially if its an outboard has had a recent water impeller fitted or change it if there is no info available. As mentioned elsewhere, carry all necessary safety gear, with no exceptions and please don't attempt to cross the Irish Sea armed with a road atlas
 
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