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I had a look at doing the job today but I'm a bit windy about the HP fuel pump and pipework that has to come off. Can someone please my fears either on here or by phone. I need to do it tomorrow as I will not have the facilities from Friday and I worry that it I won't get it done in one day, albeit I'm not changing the belt and I already have a clean, de-swirled manifold to put straight back on. Ta!
 

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Nothing difficult. Remove the fuel pipes starting at the injector ends. Unplug the pressure sensor and remove the common rail manifold, including the pipe to the HP pump. Loosen the large nut that secures the pulley a couple of turns. Remove the aux belt from the pump by backing off the sprung tensioner (tricky access, strong spring, needs 3 hands).
Now rotate the pulley by hand to line up the 2 holes in its face with threaded holes in the bracket, and use 2 M6x30 bolts to fix it to the bracket - this will hold the pulley so the cam belt isn't disturbed. Unbolt the HP pump from the mounting bracket and remove. Some older JTD pumps have a woodruff key for the pulley which is easily dropped and lost, so a towel to catch it is a good idea. However later cars used a roll pin which stays in the pump shaft.

Other than that, it's just obvious stuff like detaching the fuel filter from the bulkhead, and vacuum oil separator from the back of the head.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nothing difficult. Remove the fuel pipes starting at the injector ends. Unplug the pressure sensor and remove the common rail manifold, including the pipe to the HP pump. Loosen the large nut that secures the pulley a couple of turns. Remove the aux belt from the pump by backing off the sprung tensioner (tricky access, strong spring, needs 3 hands).
Now rotate the pulley by hand to line up the 2 holes in its face with threaded holes in the bracket, and use 2 M6x30 bolts to fix it to the bracket - this will hold the pulley so the cam belt isn't disturbed. Unbolt the HP pump from the mounting bracket and remove. Some older JTD pumps have a woodruff key for the pulley which is easily dropped and lost, so a towel to catch it is a good idea. However later cars used a roll pin which stays in the pump shaft.

Other than that, it's just obvious stuff like detaching the fuel filter from the bulkhead, and vacuum oil separator from the back of the head.
Brilliant Halftone, thank you!! This is exactly the bit I was worried about. I'll let you know how it goes once I've thawed out tomorrow, supposed to be -2 here in Invernesshire!
 

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oh, and in case your windiness derives from the terrifying pressures in the common rail, that does't apply with the engine stopped - just put a rag over the first injector fuel pipe union you loosen. After that nothing in under pressure.
 

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oh, and in case your windiness derives from the terrifying pressures in the common rail, that does't apply with the engine stopped - just put a rag over the first injector fuel pipe union you loosen. After that nothing in under pressure.
It was indeed a worry......but not now! Thanks again!
 

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Snow overnight, currently -3. Thankfully I have the use of a large garage. Not particularly looking forward to this but it has to be done. I’ll take some pictures as I go. Catch you later.
 

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One more thing, for the avoidance of panic after you get it back together. I thought I'd broken mine because despite a lot of cranking (2mins at least, in half a dozen attempts) it wouldn't fire, let alone start. Just as I was on the point of giving up, it burst into life. The reason was that all the pipes and common rail were empty of fuel after being stripped and replaced, and it took an age to purge the air through the absolutely tiny injector nozzles.

What I should have done is left the pipe connections loose at the injectors and the injector electrical connections unplugged (so it can't start). Then wrapped the pipe connections in rag, and only tightened them (and reconnected the electrical connections) when cranking produced leaking diesel. Do be careful though, if you do this - the pressure developed by the HP pump is enormous. You don't want your hands or eyes anywhere near while cranking, a good wrap of rag rag is essential.
 

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Good advice, been at at all day and won’t have it done until lunch tomorrow, PITA bolts! I’ll take pictures of the old manifold, I’m sure the swirl flaps are still in because they’re so gummed up. I’ll post again tomorrow.
 

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I'm trying to upload pictures of what came off but I can't for some reason....teething troubles with the new site I suspect, I will do later. All the flaps were still attached and I suspect that was due to the amount of crud on them holding them there! I really do wonder how the hell did it run as smoothly as it did?? Huge thanks to Halftone, your help was very much appreciated. New engine steady and EGR blanking plate on their way then that's that side of things done.
 

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Mine were pretty much carbon free, although the inlet tracts weren't. OTOH 2 of mine had fallen off when the spot welds gave out, causing plenty of damage. Yours are glued on with Tarmac. Your EGR must have been leaking for years.
 
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