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Discussion Starter #1
I have just been thinking. As you may see on my other thread i am having a bit of trouble with the clutch on our Giulietta.

In the (Almost) 5 years we have owned it I have done all of the work on it that it has needed apart from fitting and balancing tyres.

I cannot think of any jobs which were easy to do other than the battery and fuel filter.

The oil change is a PITA as the undertray needs to be removed along with the passenger wheel, the oil filter is hidden and leaks oil all over the subframe when you undo it
The air filter is buried right at the bottom and also requires part of the undertray to come off. The lid is held on by screws which are often rusty and the heads rounded off.
The front suspension is also a nightmare. To change the springs/shocks you need to remove the lower wishbones and that involves removing part of the crash structure to take the front bolts out. The front bolts on this are almost impossible to access with the front bumper in place.
Headlight bulbs are a nightmare to change
To replace the headlamps the front bumper needs to be removed. Yet again the undertray has to come off.
To replace front fog lamp bulbs the undertray has to come off.
The pollen filter isn't easy due to the fact the car was originally designed to be LHD and the pedal assembly makes it hard to get it out.
I also did a clutch change and replaced the gearbox. The subframe had to come off (I left the steering rack in place and unbolted it from the subframe) but the front suspension arms need to be removed (see above that's a PITA)
The starter motor is almost impossible to remove unless you have exactly the correct socket extension length.
The driver side driveshaft is hard to remove due to the support bearing.
The cambelt wasn't especially hard, but again there are space issues and everything on the car is very sharp so you suffer lots of cuts and scratches. :(

I will probbaly think of a few more things...


I appreciate that most of these are not everyday tasks, but of all the cars I have owned (Including a Renault) the Giulietta is the most PITA to work on. We scoff at German cars but at least they make routine servicing like changing oil, filters etc easy.
 

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I thought this when changing the EGR cooler cover. Why put a sprung tab to hold a pipe on the least accessible screw? Madness!
I did get the knack of doing the headlight bulbs, but I’ve got smallish hands and long fingers....and an old teaspoon with a notch cut into it to press the spring clip.
 

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I have just been thinking. As you may see on my other thread i am having a bit of trouble with the clutch on our Giulietta.

In the (Almost) 5 years we have owned it I have done all of the work on it that it has needed apart from fitting and balancing tyres.

I cannot think of any jobs which were easy to do other than the battery and fuel filter.

The oil change is a PITA as the undertray needs to be removed along with the passenger wheel, the oil filter is hidden and leaks oil all over the subframe when you undo it
The air filter is buried right at the bottom and also requires part of the undertray to come off. The lid is held on by screws which are often rusty and the heads rounded off.
The front suspension is also a nightmare. To change the springs/shocks you need to remove the lower wishbones and that involves removing part of the crash structure to take the front bolts out. The front bolts on this are almost impossible to access with the front bumper in place.
Headlight bulbs are a nightmare to change
To replace the headlamps the front bumper needs to be removed. Yet again the undertray has to come off.
To replace front fog lamp bulbs the undertray has to come off.
The pollen filter isn't easy due to the fact the car was originally designed to be LHD and the pedal assembly makes it hard to get it out.
I also did a clutch change and replaced the gearbox. The subframe had to come off (I left the steering rack in place and unbolted it from the subframe) but the front suspension arms need to be removed (see above that's a PITA)
The starter motor is almost impossible to remove unless you have exactly the correct socket extension length.
The driver side driveshaft is hard to remove due to the support bearing.
The cambelt wasn't especially hard, but again there are space issues and everything on the car is very sharp so you suffer lots of cuts and scratches. :(

I will probbaly think of a few more things...


I appreciate that most of these are not everyday tasks, but of all the cars I have owned (Including a Renault) the Giulietta is the most PITA to work on. We scoff at German cars but at least they make routine servicing like changing oil, filters etc easy.
Add to that the internal door release handles of which I have done both drivers and passenger sides.My two grandchildren have now had it drummed into them do not touch them in the back or grandad will blow a gasket
 

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That's nearly exactly what a keen amateur ALFA mechanics hands should look like....only needs a couple of bruises and a black or broken nail and you could turn professional!
 

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I have just been thinking. As you may see on my other thread i am having a bit of trouble with the clutch on our Giulietta.

In the (Almost) 5 years we have owned it I have done all of the work on it that it has needed apart from fitting and balancing tyres.

I cannot think of any jobs which were easy to do other than the battery and fuel filter.

The oil change is a PITA as the undertray needs to be removed along with the passenger wheel, the oil filter is hidden and leaks oil all over the subframe when you undo it
The air filter is buried right at the bottom and also requires part of the undertray to come off. The lid is held on by screws which are often rusty and the heads rounded off.
The front suspension is also a nightmare. To change the springs/shocks you need to remove the lower wishbones and that involves removing part of the crash structure to take the front bolts out. The front bolts on this are almost impossible to access with the front bumper in place.
Headlight bulbs are a nightmare to change
To replace the headlamps the front bumper needs to be removed. Yet again the undertray has to come off.
To replace front fog lamp bulbs the undertray has to come off.
The pollen filter isn't easy due to the fact the car was originally designed to be LHD and the pedal assembly makes it hard to get it out.
I also did a clutch change and replaced the gearbox. The subframe had to come off (I left the steering rack in place and unbolted it from the subframe) but the front suspension arms need to be removed (see above that's a PITA)
The starter motor is almost impossible to remove unless you have exactly the correct socket extension length.
The driver side driveshaft is hard to remove due to the support bearing.
The cambelt wasn't especially hard, but again there are space issues and everything on the car is very sharp so you suffer lots of cuts and scratches. :(

I will probbaly think of a few more things...


I appreciate that most of these are not everyday tasks, but of all the cars I have owned (Including a Renault) the Giulietta is the most PITA to work on. We scoff at German cars but at least they make routine servicing like changing oil, filters etc easy.
Yes- you can excuse the difficulty of the major jobs, but the air filter design is just bonkers. I dont find the oil filter too bad, but thats only compared to the one on the Busso in my 916 Spider, which is virtually impossible to remove with the engine in place!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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So far I've found the brakes easy, then again they are on most cars. The Egr valve wasn't too bad to change. Headlight bulbs are a pain if the spring drops out.
The gear lever piston sensor was a bit of a PITA. Under the car, drilling rivets out to remove the heat shield (why not just bolt it on?).
 

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Brakes are OK, I've done disks and pads front and back. Fuel filter easy. Oil is OK as only the back part of the undertray has to come off. Oil Filter is a PITA. Air Filter is worse due to the silly number of bolts on the front part of the undertray.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I am booking the car into a garage tomorrow.

After fitting a new master cylinder I just cannot get the clutch to work correctly. It is as if there is still air trapped, but despite lots of effort we just cannot remove it.
Stupid design, what is wrong with having a nipple on one side and an inlet on the other on the slave.


The nipple does bleed the hoses etc, but if there is air in the slave it just doesn't get it out as the slave only has one pipe going into it.
 

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Not sure if the bleed nipple is the same on all the gearbox slave cylinders but I found out how to bleed the clutch after entrusting CV in nottingham to service my car. Halfway home on a Saturday afternoon when the service department was shut I had to pump the clutch many times to change gear at each junction but I got home. Then I had to bleed the clutch myself at the slave cylinder with an accomplice. But it's just like a standard nipple only you have to remove the clip and pull the pipe back one click. Hope that may save you some cash if its the same?

I do everything I can myself, anti roll bars (147), Alternator (147), EGR valves(147 and Giulietta), EGR cooler(Giulietta), brake pads and disks(every car I've ever owned), rear hatch wiring looms(Giulietta), I've never had to replace a bulb in any of my Alfa's, but last year the alternator on the Giulietta fried. I couldn't see a simple DIY way of replacing it and I entrusted my bella to MWT in Lincoln. They replaced the alternator for a fixed price and I know they underestimated how big of a job it was going to turn into, but they honoured their quote. Happy days but even for people in the trade they said it was a proper PITA. I've got a 2010 2.0jtdm2.
 

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Have
I am booking the car into a garage tomorrow.

After fitting a new master cylinder I just cannot get the clutch to work correctly. It is as if there is still air trapped, but despite lots of effort we just cannot remove it.
Stupid design, what is wrong with having a nipple on one side and an inlet on the other on the slave.


The nipple does bleed the hoses etc, but if there is air in the slave it just doesn't get it out as the slave only has one pipe going into it.
Have you tried doing with 2 people? Open bleed nipple, pedal down, close nipple, pedal up, repeat. Sometimes if you just pump the pedal, the air just moves backwards and forwards and never comes out.
 

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if it's like my 2010 car you cant open a nipple, it looks like a standard nipple to attach a hose to but it is just a plastic moulding with no threads to undo, you have to pull a spring clip up, pull the pipe off 1 click from the slave cylinder, push the pedal down and then refit the pipe and clip before releasing the pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Have

Have you tried doing with 2 people? Open bleed nipple, pedal down, close nipple, pedal up, repeat. Sometimes if you just pump the pedal, the air just moves backwards and forwards and never comes out.
if it's like my 2010 car you cant open a nipple, it looks like a standard nipple to attach a hose to but it is just a plastic moulding with no threads to undo, you have to pull a spring clip up, pull the pipe off 1 click from the slave cylinder, push the pedal down and then refit the pipe and clip before releasing the pedal.

I have tried all of that unfortunately. :( Someone pumping the pedal, vacuum bleed, jacking one side of the car up etc... Fluid is coming through without air but there appears to be air trapped in the slave which won't come out.
We spent around 5 hours over the weekend trying various bleeding methods without success.

As the car is getting on a bit now I am half tempted to get it fixed and then sell it before it goes wrong again.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well latest news from the garage is that there is an issue with the clutch or the slave cylinder, so the gearbox is going to have to come off.

Both the clutch and slave were replaced May 2017 and around 25,000 miles ago. Surely you would expect them to last longer than that especially as not much town driving is involved?

They were LUK items, so not cheap rubbish.

A big bill is on it's way.... :(
 

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Well latest news from the garage is that there is an issue with the clutch or the slave cylinder, so the gearbox is going to have to come off.

Both the clutch and slave were replaced May 2017 and around 25,000 miles ago. Surely you would expect them to last longer than that especially as not much town driving is involved?

They were LUK items, so not cheap rubbish.

A big bill is on it's way.... :(
that's annoying. when i took my 159 to my indy he said my dmf was going again, that was 3 years old and 20k miles. again these were proper oem items from a reputable alfa spares place.
the 159 had broken me with the bills, so i replaced it with a gqv.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I am seriously considering getting rid once it is fixed. We have had a reasonably good run with it, but you start to worry what is going to fail next.
I am expecting the bill to be around £1000-£1200 all in for new clutch, flywheel and slave. The car is probably worth about £2.5k
 

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Apparently there is a worse car to work on than the G. Mine is in for its MOT and needed the front wishbones done, the guy at the garage said that as bad as the G is for needing the chassis beams removed they specialise in Italian cars, and the Fiat 500 Abarth requires a complete front end removal for its wishbones.

He had a few choice words about the ridiculous number of screws on the front undertray though!
 
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