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...just for once, something with a British story, set in Britain, with a quality British cast, that was not made with the US market in mind, was not a gangster-flick, was not a romantic comedy by Simon Curtis with unfeasibly middle-class slightly silly awfully-awfully male lead (so that Americans can watch it and have a giggle at our expense), and certainly not yet another American film with an English uber-baddy that everyone can enjoy hating and throwing popcorn at (so that Americans can watch it and have a giggle at our expense, yawn, yawn)

Yes, I am nearly 50, yes it is Telstar and yes, I would have loved it.

Imagine my delighted surprise when checking on Cineworld's website, that it was showing at their cinema at chav-Central in Stevenage. Hey, maybe it's the HQ of the Joe Meek appreciation society for all I know?

Anyway, I drove all the way over there, only to find that the film wasn't showing at all, never was showing, even though it says it is on their website.

WTF is going on in this country?!
 
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There is now only one cinema i'll go to now after many mishaps in Basildon and Southend :(

I only go to the O2 cinema because you don't get any chavs there and its nice a plesent place to go to :D
 

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What about the Empire Leicester Square? We're seeing HP there today. Last time we were there was for Blade Runner!
 
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If it ever was there, it's not there now, Toxic.

My whole point is that a great, intrinsically British film is invisible in the mainstream provincial cinemas - a very sad indictment of British cinemas and indeed, of British Cinema itself.

We can't seem to make a film for our own audience, for our own sake. So much talent here, both in front of and behind the camera and we just can't do it.
 
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Yes, the mother of all (modern) Brit gangster flicks - Brighton Rock was the original of course. A great film though, with a good soundtrack by Francis Monkman, the bloke out of Sky.

Just a bit fed up with the proliferation of Brit gangster flicks though, we have so much more to offer. They are very popular at home of course but at the end of the day, they are made with the American market in mind. I find it a bit sad.
 
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Probably because the American market is much bigger, and therefore more lucrative, than the home market.

Hardly surprising then.
Yes, I understand the reasons why - I just think it's sad and that if the (political as much as anything else) will were there, it could be so different. You only have to look at the French and Italian film industry.

Film is an important part of art and culture, a form of national expression. It is sadly lacking in the UK at the moment.
 

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I went to a cinema in Belfast some time ago, I had unlimited coffee and a 2 seater sofa for the film. that's what I'm on about!
 
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It says a lot that I haven't even heard of the film, and I work in telly.

Mind you having just looked it up, james corden is it which has put me off straight away!
 

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What was wrong with The Full Monty, or Calendar Girls? :)
 

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It says a lot that I haven't even heard of the film, and I work in telly.

Mind you having just looked it up, james corden is it which has put me off straight away!
Yes, he just plays a stupid ( drummer ) person in it. True to form there methinks !!!!!
 
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What was wrong with The Full Monty, or Calendar Girls? :)
Both fine films, but how long ago were they? And Brassed off - another good film but still dealing with the fallout of 'Thatcher Britain', years after the event - we need to do better than this.
 
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Yes, he just plays a stupid ( drummer ) person in it. True to form there methinks !!!!!
Oi, I used to be a drummer and I got A levels! :p

And the guy he plays, Clem Cattini was a fine drummer and all-round good egg. He stood in for Ringo when he broke his hand and the Beatles were on Tour and he was one of the best British session drummers around - nice geezer too, I met him on many occasions :thumbs:
 

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Yes, I understand the reasons why - I just think it's sad and that if the (political as much as anything else) will were there, it could be so different. You only have to look at the French and Italian film industry.

Film is an important part of art and culture, a form of national expression. It is sadly lacking in the UK at the moment.
Welcome to the Canadian film model, Max.

What you're describing is what we've been living with for decades.

The numbers of Canadian* films made is minute -- even taken as a relative number. Those that are made can't get distribution outside of three or four major Canadian cities or art house movie theatres.

They have tiny advertising budgets so nobody ever hears about them so of course nobody bothers even looking for them.

Mind you Canadian filmmakers bring on part of the problem themselves. Very few even try to make movies that can be enjoyed by a large audience. Reading the reviews of most of the movies you come across descriptions like "edgy," "experimental," "angst-ridden," and "niche."

Sadly I must admit that even as a person who has at times made serious efforts to watch Canadian cinema, I read the middle-of-the-road reviews and think, "nah, I don't think I'll bother making the effort to try to see this latest Canadian movie about sad, depressing people living miserable lives."

Take heart in the fact that your fellow countrymen and women actually recognize the names of any British movie, even if it is a gangster picture. I doubt the average person on the street could even guess at the name of any Canadian movie (or any Canadian movie made in the last 30-years). There may be a couple of people who might be able to offer up Passchendaele Passchendaele (2008) but they'd be in a very small minority.

Actually I hate to admit it, but I've never seen Passchendaele. The reviews were middling to good, but in the end I just couldn't sit through that much Paul Gross. He's fine in front of the camera, and he's a fabulous force for patriotic good in Canadian filmmaking but behind the lens he really needs somebody to ride herd on him (see Men with Brooms or most of the worst episodes of Due South or the pair of mini-series H20 and Trojan Horse examples).

To see a good use of Gross watch Slings & Arrows. It's a pretty decent and watchable TV series, due to the stellar, mostly theatre-trained cast and the fact that Paul Gross wasn't in charge of the writing, producing and directing.

And if somebody is actually looking for a half-decent, fairly recent Canuck flic, my recommendation would be Bon Cop, Bad Cop.

Sorry about taking this rant down a slightly maple-flavoured diversion, but I really do sympathize with you Max. That lack of any meaningful national movie-making industry and the overwhelming dominance of the American market really is one that is all to familiar to us.
--Toronto

*In this case "Canadian" means outside of Quebec since that province has its own thriving film industry. Of course it's one that that English Canadians rarely get a glimpse of as most of the movies aren't released in English, or released in English-speaking Canada.
 
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Hi Toronto, hope you are well. I must confess, I didn't think you had the same problem. Do you not have the 'Film Board of Canada' or some such body? Come to think of it, I think they do a few co-prods with BBC Films and Channel 4 Films from the UK. In which case, they must be struggling for money, ha ha!

It seems the French speaking world, although often 'on their high-horse' have some idea of wanting to try and keep their own film industry alive and thereby some semblance of National Identity. I have to applaud that.

I love American cinema but I am heartily fed-up with watching their portrayal of Brits as hideous villains and ineffectual buffoons. Even to the extent of using an American actor with a dodgy English accent if they couldn't get a Brit for the part. The War of Independence was a long time ago, get over it! And of course, we in the UK go to the cinema in our droves and lap it all up.
 
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