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Discussion Starter #1
The Alfa Romeo badge features a snake.

I knew that..

But I've only just realised that the snake is eating a red man.

A red man.

Evil snake.

I use to think it was the snakes forked tongue.

It's definitely a red man.

Can I go now?
 

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And the snake seems to be wearing a crown!
 

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The Alfa Romeo badge features a snake.

I knew that..

But I've only just realised that the snake is eating a red man.

A red man.

Evil snake.

I use to think it was the snakes forked tongue.

It's definitely a red man.

Can I go now?
The 'red man' in the mouth of the serpent symbolises the defeat of the Saracens by the Milanese forces in the First Crusade.

And the snake seems to be wearing a crown!
Some time after the crusades, when the 2 ruling families in Milan merged, the Dukes of Austria (who ruled Italy at the time) signified their royal approval of this merger by approving the placement of a crown on the serpent's head.
 

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Registered
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The Alfa Romeo badge features a snake.

I knew that..

But I've only just realised that the snake is eating a red man.

A red man.

Evil snake.

I use to think it was the snakes forked tongue.

It's definitely a red man.

Can I go now?
It's actually a boy (child)

Biscione
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The biscione , also known as the vipera ("viper"), is a heraldic charge showing in argent an azure serpent in the act of consuming a human; usually a child and sometimes described as a Moor. It was the emblem of the House of Visconti from the 11th century, becoming associated with Milan as the Visconti gained control over the city in 1277. When the Visconti family died out in the 15th century, the emblem retained its association with the Duchy of Milan and became part of the coats of arms of the House of Sforza; the presence of biscione in Poland (Sanok) and Belarus (Pruzhany) is due to queen Bona Sforza.

The word biscione is an augmentative of Italian biscia "non-venomous snake; grass snake" (corrupted from bistia, ultimately from Latin bestia). As the symbol of Milan, the biscione is also used by the football club Inter Milan, by car manufacturer Alfa Romeo...
 
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