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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

(ALFA 33, 1.7IE 1989)
Just replaced the Wheel Cyclinders and Shoes on the Alfa, and the self-adjuster... how do you get it to self-adjust?

Cheers

Nick
 

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First you have to put a hydraylic lifter on the center of the axel and raise the car so that rear wheels dont touch ground .Then you have to unscrew little the bolt on the regulator ( just front of the left side odf rear axel, put 6kg weight on the small clamp on the left side of the regulator and the tight the bolt. Thats it ....
 

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In that case the answer is "you don't."
If the self-adjusters are installed correctly you can see them doing their thing as follows:
* Jack up right rear of car so wheel is off the ground
* Remove wheel
* Remove brake drum
* Check car is in neutral and start engine (to reduce brake pedal effort)
* Press brake pedal (only part way down so brake cylinder won't overextend) while standing outside the car so you can see the brake shoe(s) move.
Each time you press the brakes, a brake shoe will move outward enough that the self-adjuster can click over a tooth or two. Eventually the shoes will self-adjust out so far that you can't get the brake drum to fit over them any more.

So the adjusters can work, but in practice with the drum on they don't seem to. My theory is there's too much slack (in the springs holding the adjuster to the brake shoes) and not enough travel (in the brake shoes when they have the drum in the way).

I use the above technique (not necessarily with the engine running) to adjust the brake shoes whenever handbrake and foot brake travel become excessive - keep pumping the pedal and refitting/removing the drum until the drum only just fits over the shoes, then bolt it all up again and repeat the process next year. :rolleyes:
 

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As for handbrake you can adjust it a little from inside the car under the cover....
 

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Yes.. take the h/brake off... fit the shoes on the ratchet so they just about fit inside the drum and then fit the drum. Normal use will "pump" the shoes to the next notch on the rathet that keeps the shoes "almost" in contact with the drum.


Ralf S.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Guys.

Feels more Art than Science.

Short answer is they should self-adjust on use of the brakes, long answer is they need more than a little help.

I was hoping for the adjust to work, so I had no fitted the drums snuggly. So I will.

Thanks for the advice.

Cheers

Nick
 
K

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yes, as has been said they will self adjust up to a point, but it may take a while. best to adjust them yourself until you can just get the drum on and turn it by hand, a bit of dragging is acceptable.
make sure once you put the drum on then tap the face whilst rotating the drum, this will settle the shoes into position. if the drum gets a bit easier then remove it again and adjust up a bit more, shouldn't take more than one or two goes.
also the hand-brake cable should be slackened off before adjusting, otherwise it can give a false reading as the shoes can sit on the hand-brake lever and not on the self-adjuster :cool:
 

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also the hand-brake cable should be slackened off before adjusting, otherwise it can give a false reading as the shoes can sit on the hand-brake lever and not on the self-adjuster
This is true - I forgot to add in my previous post that the handbrake must be off when adjusting the brakes.:eek:
 

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Hi,

I found a reference some time ago on a forum suggesting that you could (just) move the adjuster using a small flat-blade screw-driver. This worked on the rear brakes from a 1.7 Sprint. The adjuster has a "cog-wheel" which adjusts the length of the adjuster. Using a screw-driver with fine (sharp) blade you can just engage the teeth on the cog-wheel through the wheel-bolt hole on the drum.

Helpfully moving the cog-wheel upwards on both sides increases the length of the adjuster.

It worked for me but cannot find the original reference now. A small torch with a well-focused beam helps with locating the cog-wheel through the bolt hole.

Rob
 

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I found a reference some time ago on a forum suggesting that you could (just) move the adjuster using a small flat-blade screw-driver.
Yeah you can, and I used to do that, but it requires some force because you're working against the spring that returns the brake shoes to their resting position. I've ended up damaging the adjuster cog teeth by tapping them with a screwdriver and a hammer. :p
I know someone who drills special holes to allow adjustment without taking the drums off. It would save having to track down and purchase more of those darn hub nuts every time the brakes need adjusting, and it would justify using the screwdriver adjustment method.
But taking the drum off also allows me to check everything, sand the brake shoes and their contact surface inside the drum (stops the brakes being noisy when cold for a few weeks :rolleyes: ), and if necessary grind off the lip created by the brake pads wearing a groove in the drum over time.
 
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