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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So the other night, i couldn't sleep, and i started thinking about the process of reading.

When we read, we absorb, comprehend, and predict what's coming next. But then isn't that true of everything that we view? Every second, via our eyes we're absorbing, comprehending and predicting events as they develop in front of us? So is viewing and reading fundamentally the same thing? Aren't we always reading?

I'm not sure where I'm going with this, but i eventually dropped off at about 5am :)
 

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Similar processes - but speed counts.

Reading - it takes time to absorb what we reading, we may pause then go back and read again. We have time to react - we can change our minds and decide that hmm - upon reflection, maybe my reaction will be diferent.

Sight - absorb it now and react instantly. Got it wrong ? Tough sh17 (curse the swear filter) there is no going back.
 
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Reading for pleasure is way different from
reading say, a technical report.

Scanning/speed-reading is more like seeing.

Ruined my enjoyment of reading when I got
sent on a speed-reading course. I wouldn't
recommend it to any one whole loves reading.
 
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For me seeing (viewing) is a shared experience of someone else's interpretation, reading lays the foundations on which your imagination builds upon.
I prefer reading, though seeing is a close second.
 

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Ruined my enjoyment of reading when I got
sent on a speed-reading course. I wouldn't
recommend it to any one whole loves reading.
Haven't been on a course but I was told that to "speed read " you scan down the centre of a page of text taking in the words you see. It works - you get the gist . It also shows that most work stuff is hyperbole. Bring back the art of precis I say.

My point? I LOVE reading so novels are a treat - no desire to speed read them. Although I scan read work stuff I can still wallow in novels - "Nocturnes" (as I have posted before) is a treat and I take my time reading such stuff.
 
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What about the present?
Nope.

Everything we see is reflected light. and light takes time to travel from the object to your eye.

So when somebody talks to you, or you see something moving, it's already happened and is in the past before you see it happening.

The delay timescale is obviously tinier than we can imagine, but it's still there.
 

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This thread is way too complex for a blonde with a hangover....... now where did I put my Beano?
 
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Nope.

Everything we see is reflected light. and light takes time to travel from the object to your eye.

So when somebody talks to you, or you see something moving, it's already happened and is in the past before you see it happening.

The delay timescale is obviously tinier than we can imagine, but it's still there.
A true pedant!

Though I would disagree about your comment about reflected light.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
cheers guys - some interesting replies!

Nope.

Everything we see is reflected light. and light takes time to travel from the object to your eye.

So when somebody talks to you, or you see something moving, it's already happened and is in the past before you see it happening
HST - is that a fact i.e proven by science? If so, hmm, i was going to ask about real-time; but then real-time would be relative to what we view in real time. So our real-time might not be real time? Drat. Talked myself into confusion now :)
 
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cheers guys - some interesting replies!



HST - is that a fact i.e proven by science? If so, hmm, i was going to ask about real-time; but then real-time would be relative to what we view in real time. So our real-time might not be real time? Drat. Talked myself into confusion now :)
Great, isn't it :thumbs:

I was just told it in passing by a Physicist once upon a time and it always stuck with me. It makes sense to me, if nothing else, although I probably lake the brain power to discuss the details as well as a Scientist would :lol:
 

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cheers guys - some interesting replies!



HST - is that a fact i.e proven by science? If so, hmm, i was going to ask about real-time; but then real-time would be relative to what we view in real time. So our real-time might not be real time? Drat. Talked myself into confusion now :)
It's proven by the fact that the speed of light has been measured and quantified. As HST says we rely on light waves/rays to see and they take time to travel. If you look at the stars you are looking at ancient history because of the vast distances the light has to travel to reach your eyes.

It's cool :D
 
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Well some things do emit light, but very few naturally emit visible light.
Astronomical objects
Sunlight (solar radiation)
Moonlight (reflected)
Meteors/meteor showers (via ionization)
Stars(burning balls of gas)
Star clusters
Galaxies
Quasars
Nebulae
Accretion disks
Bioluminescence
Glowworms (Arachnocampa and Phengodidae) and fireflies (Lampyridae)
Aequorea victoria (a type of jellyfish)
Antarctic krill
Lux operon (a common marine bacterium)
Foxfire
Lightning
Aurorae
Airglow
Triboluminescence
Magma
Plasma (physics)



More than a few.
 
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It's proven by the fact that the speed of light has been measured and quantified. As HST says we rely on light waves/rays to see and they take time to travel. If you look at the stars you are looking at ancient history because of the vast distances the light has to travel to reach your eyes.

It's cool :D
Light radiation is thermally relative, its warm.

Still cool though!
 
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Astronomical objects
Sunlight (solar radiation)
Moonlight (reflected)
Meteors/meteor showers (via ionization)
Stars(burning balls of gas)
Star clusters
Galaxies
Quasars
Nebulae
Accretion disks
Bioluminescence
Glowworms (Arachnocampa and Phengodidae) and fireflies (Lampyridae)
Aequorea victoria (a type of jellyfish)
Antarctic krill
Lux operon (a common marine bacterium)
Foxfire
Lightning
Aurorae
Airglow
Triboluminescence
Magma
Plasma (physics)



More than a few.
A few compared to the millions of objects we see every day that don't emit light.
And not all Nebula emit light, some are reflected light. Hence the reason why they're divided into Reflection or emission nebula. (and moonlight as you say in your list is refelected light, so doesn't naturally emit light itself)
and Sunlight/Stars, clusters, galaxies can hardly be stated as separate points, they're all the same thing ;)
Aurorae is just solar emission hitting an atmosphere, so could arguably be wrapped up within Star/Sunlight, although it's caused I believe by infrared, not visible light.

Fascinating subject :thumbs:
 
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A few compared to the millions of objects we see every day that don't emit light.
And not all Nebula emit light, some are reflected light. (and moonlight as you say in your list is refelected light, so doesn't naturally emit light)
and Sunlight/Stars, clusters, galaxies can hardly be stated as separate points, they're all the same thing ;)
Aurorae is just solar emission hitting an atmosphere, so could be wrapped up within Star/Sunlight

Your degree of pedancy is recognised and admired, hats off to you sir!
 
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