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Discussion Starter #1
My 146 is very 'anti' cold weather.

Normally the door locks freeze up and I have to clamber in through the boot! Then when I finally push the drivers door open it wont lock shut so I have to drive around with one hand holding the door closed with the other.

But now it appears that my handbrake freezes on, the lever goes limp, performance goes down and I get that familiar smell of burning brake pads.

is this a common 146 problem?
 

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Its very common when the little rubber gaiters split around the cable.Best to leave it in gear when its very cold until you can replace them.
 

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Yeah but.. you could sort these issues fairly easily.

Loosen the handbrake off inside the car and unclip the end of the cables off each caliper. Take the cables off the car and leave them hanging in the airing cupboard or somwhere warm for a few hours (catch the water that drips out with an old towel, rather than your missus' best linen :thumbs:)

When they're completely dry (it'll probably take a couple of days by "air".. so you might want to warm them up with a hair dryer etc.) then spray some WD40 down them and work it out the other end. Then pack a load of LM grease into the cable from the caliper end. You'll have to cram it in.. as much as you can. Heat it with the hair dryer again to help it "flow" down the cable.

When you've stuffed half a tin of grease in there, the beast is lubed. Put back as much of the rubber gaitor that remains..

Refit the cables and tighten up at the handbrake.. and Robert's your mother's brother for a couple of years.

For best results, do it in the autumn, before the cold snap begins and so less time for water to get into the cables (as it will again, eventually).

The door locks is just laziness on your part, I'm afraid... :tut:

Spray WD in there to lube them up.. but the kerosene will evaporate (which is why you keep having to do it probably) so you also need grease in there. Pack the locks with grease.. and work it well in. Pack in as much as you can to physically prevent water getting in then freezing.

Also grease the jaws of the lock mechanism itself (where it clamps onto the striker plate) and then work it in by opening/closing the door till it feels smoooother than me in a smoking jacket... ;)

Use graphite (green) grease for the lock jaw.. LM grease (tan) for the lock mechanism itself.

You can also wipe the door rubbers with your favourite tyre shine product, since it contains oils that are rubber-friendly and will prevent moisture freezing the door itself shut..

Ralf S.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey thanks,
I am totally overwhelmed nay flabergasted by the kindness and support shown by my fellow 146 owners :)
Airing cupboard/grease city here I come
 

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Hey thanks,
I am totally overwhelmed nay flabergasted by the kindness and support shown by my fellow 146 owners :)
Airing cupboard/grease city here I come
I forgot about this problem as my car is off the road at the moment, I think its funny, I always leave my car in 2nd gear in the winter, Its the same on the 145, 155, Fiat Bravo.
 

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I also had this problem a few years back. Took them off and put engine oil in them. and packed up with grease on the ends. No problems with freezing so far and we live out in the sticks in a cold valley where the freezing fog always sits.

Door locks however do need seeing to.
 

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Use white grease in the door locks, not WD40. White grease is also better for filling the handbrake cables with as it's much kinder than normal grease or oil which will eventually attack any rubber it comes into contact with. I used it in my new cables 3 years ago and no freezing so far :)
 
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