Alfa Romeo Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I was curious has anybody done some kind of turbo petrol engine swap?
I've seen 1.75 TBI swapped by this Belarussian guy but I was wondering if it would be possible to fit a Fiat Coupe Turbo engine inside.
It's just an idea, I have not started to do it, I don't even have GT at the moment.
I am just looking for suggestions, costs, problems if I started such a swap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Coupe engines into a GT shouldn't be too hard. I've seen it done in 156's, which are technically identical to the GT.
This guy has 20v turbo engine in his 156, even a Q4 as of recently. I believe it should be fairly bolt on to do. Obviously you will need to adapt the piping for intercooler, air intake, exhaust, water hoses etc, but those aren't the worst to do. For ECU you will either need an ECU and wiring harness from a fiat coupe and cut away the things you don't need, or a standalone ECU. The axles might need some modifications, I am unsure if the length will be correct and the joints are the same. I think the gearboxes have the same bolt pattern as a Twin Spark or JTD, so you can choose. I would suggest using the coupe transmission since they are pretty strong, the JTD should also be pretty good. TS ones aren't that good. I know there's some threads about Twin Spark turbo conversions you can read which give some good info regarding this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
But GT and 156 are quite different. Can the electronics be done to work as a stock car?
Can it have traction, immobiliser and such stuff?
I've read a thread years ago about a guy who did this swap on a 147 and he used some kind of CAN bus emulator or something like this. But when I checked the price for it was something like 2k pounds which is quite expensive and not worth it imo.
 

·
Registered
2004 Alfa Romeo 156 1.8TS
Joined
·
502 Posts
You can't expect to do an engine swap, for something that was never fitted to the car in the first place, and expect it to be cheap. Fitting an engine that was originally fitted to a different car is never going to be a cheap option.
 

·
Registered
Alfa 159 2.0 JTDm Lusso 6sp.
Joined
·
6,494 Posts
Or even one that was fitting to the same model. A different engine will have different mounts, gearbox (usually) and ECUs. Usually cheaper and far less hassle to buy another car. Its not nice and simple these days...like is was when I put a 3.0 V in my 1.3 Mk2 Escort!!!. I did not even know what an ECU was back then!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Usually you need to remove the entire engine wiring loom from the donor car and fit it as a separate unit to the new car, and connect things like fuel pump and tachometer output among other things from the new ECU to the car. For the immobilizer it depends on how its done in both the cars. If you're very lucky you might be able to transfer the immobilizer box (if its not included in the ECU) and the other accessories. Most likely you will want to have the new ECU reprogrammed to have the immobilizer be disabled. With a standalone you don't need to worry about this. In a GT you should expect a check engine light that won't be too easy to get rid of. Getting all the CAN stuff to talk to each other is probably possible but not too easy. You might be able to retain CAN communications for the rest of the ECU's with the engine ECU missing, or else you're gonna have a fun time :) If you just ignore this then it will be much the same as installing a standalone ECU. With decently older cars you can disconnect a bunch of stuff before the ECUs completely stop working. For this swap you really don't need too much more than a complete wiring loom and engine with sensors, and some electrical knowledge and time. Just a few weeks ago I drove a Volvo 240 with a BMW M50 engine from an E39, and it's the exact same procedure really. Just cut away all wires you don't need and adapt what you need, the immobilizer was programmed away.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top