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So I have a 2002 147 2.0 TSpark that wont rev properly. It idles perfectly and revs to about 2000rpm before struggling. I suspect it is running lean after that. This hose (with the red tape in) is perished and leaks petrol, so I wonder if it sucks air in at higher revs?? The key thing is, which part no is it so I can get a new one... And does my theory make sense?

The hose is just to the rhs of the engine block, running from the firewall towards the block, underneath the air intake

Thanks in advance. Maarten
 

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Maarten,
Petrol? I think you should have another look at what fluid is leaking. That is a heater hose, with coolant inside (well, mostly inside...). The hose attaches to the water pump housing at the engine end, and to the heater core at the firewall end. Have you checked the coolant level in the expansion tank lately? If not then I think you ought to...

I have no idea why Alfa made that particular hose with an extra bit of smaller diameter hose protruding from the side of it. It serves no purpose (the protrusion) since it has a blank end that attaches to nothing (the hose may also fit on another model Alfa, on which the protrusion does serve a purpose...?).

Vlad at Arese Spares in Sydney ( https://www.aresespares.com.au/ ) should be able to supply the specific hose (I would think), but a length of generic heater hose (cheap) may well do it since the hose isn't a particularly complex shape (other than the protruding 'appendix', which really is irrelevant).

The hose is under pressure, and is about to fail completely, so needs to be replaced ASAP before you suddenly loose the majority of the coolant, with all that implies. I'd also have a good look at all the other coolant hoses...

As to the other (IMO unrelated) issue of the engine struggling above 2000rpm, there are many potential suspects. Start by ensuring that the basics are OK, such as spark plugs and clean air filter. Beyond that, I suspect that you may need to have a mechanic look at it since I'm getting the impression that you aren't mechanically experienced...?

Regards,
John.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks John, you are right - certainly not mechanically experienced with cars.. I've had enough experience with motorbikes that I get the theory, just have no idea where things go under a bonnet. I have had a mechanic look but they werent much use and the car isnt worth spending a lot on. I have replaced the fuel pump (with a second hand one) on their recommendation but no luck. I will try removing the air filter and running it for a minute to see what happens, and have a look at the plugs, although it doesnt appear to be misfiring, just not revving, so either air or fuel flow is more likely. As far as I could tell, there's no fuel filter on this model except for a coarse one on the pump itself?

If I cant solve this issue, theres no point fixing the other stuff (it needs suspension rubbers as well as a couple of other bits), so I will keep trying on the cheap for now.

Thanks for the reply.
 

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The refusal to rev thing could be so many things, I can't really help without more information (and even then...).

Experimentally deleting the air filter (for a short time...) is easy and costs nothing, and may be the cause of the problem. In my experience, city cars (is yours?) tend to clog up the filter a lot faster than country cars, and with a nastier contaminant. In city traffic, the engine is continually breathing in filthy polluted air, especially oily diesel fumes which clag up the filter with greasy / sticky crap. If the filter hasn't been changed in a long time, then it could well be restricting airflow.

Air filters fitted to country based cars can last for a very long time. They mostly become clogged with light dust (if used much on dirt roads, and driving too close behind other cars). Most of this dust will just blow out with compressed air, or can be washed out with soapy water (I use a strong solution of water and laundry liquid, thoroughly rinse it out, and thoroughly dry before refitting). It is quite possible to successfully clean paper element air filters, depending on what exactly is clogging it up (i.e. dusty more than oily contamination).

Re the hose, in your position (of wanting to spend as little as possible), I'd remove the suspect hose and have a close look at the whole thing. If the only part of it that looks bad is around / near where it is leaking, then I'd just cut that section out and insert a length of metal pipe in its' place...

Regards,
John.
 

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Air filters fitted to country based cars can last for a very long time. They mostly become clogged with light dust (if used much on dirt roads, and driving too close behind other cars). Most of this dust will just blow out with compressed air, or can be washed out with soapy water (I use a strong solution of water and laundry liquid, thoroughly rinse it out, and thoroughly dry before refitting). It is quite possible to successfully clean paper element air filters, depending on what exactly is clogging it up (i.e. dusty more than oily contamination).



Regards,
John.
Whilst K and N type filters can be washed why would you wash a paper filter? Just bin it and replace if it’s clogged.

As for the problem what have the garage actually checked on it, have they hooked up diagnostics to check codes and data? Also what made them say replace pump does it have a fuel pressure problem or did they just take a guess? If so and pump didn’t resolve it what’s the condition of fuel pipes and hoses etc?
 

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Whilst K and N type filters can be washed why would you wash a paper filter? Just bin it and replace if it’s clogged.
Because paper element air filters can often be fairly easily washed then re-used quite successfully (depending on what was clogging the filter, i.e. not if clogged with impregnated oily gunk, which would be difficult to clean successfully).

Because money may be relatively tight and a new air filter is relatively expensive.

Because a new filter isn't immediately available at any of the local purveyors of car parts, and has to be ordered / waited for.

Because of a mild aversion to unecessary waste, and there may be nothing inherently wrong with the old filter that can't be easily fixed.

Why wouldn't you bin a dirty K&N style filter? Why clean and re-oil it, given the hassle / mess associated with this job? Why use a K&N style filter in the first place, given that paper element filters are generally cheaper and better? (i.e. larger filtration area giving better filtration for longer, and inherently better airflow, typically).

There is one theoretical reason why not (clean a paper filter); because a cleaned paper element filter does have a very slightly lesser potential maximum airflow compared to a brand new filter. However, stock paper element air filters are typically significantly larger than they actually need to be (i.e. are usually quite unrestrictive), so there is significant reserve to cope with a theoretical reduction in maximum airflow capacity, without a significant impact on how easily / how much air actually passes through the filter in use. In my experience a cleaned paper filter will still flow as much air as freely as the engine requires without impacting engine performance.

I have cleaned a dirty filter (dusty dirt), noticing a significant 'seat of the pants' power increase afterward. A week or so later I fitted a brand new filter (having waited for delivery), and couldn't detect any power difference at all compared to the old but cleaned filter. Admittedly this was only measured by means of my 'seat of the pants dyno', a real dynamometer might have detected a slight measurable difference, but on the road no difference was discernible.

To clean a dirty filter; I blow it out with compressed air from the 'clean side' of the element, then hose it through from the clean side (with a strongish 'spray' setting on the hose nozzle, not a strong concentrated jet), then submerge the filter in laundry liquid / water and strongly agitate it up and down, causing soapy water to vigorously flow both ways through the paper element. I then spray it again with the hose, and allow to dry in the sun. There is probably a limit to how many times a filter can be cleaned, I have never cleaned a filter more than once, though more times may be possible.

Regards,
John.
 

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Isn't that bit protruding from the heater hose a bleed nipple?

Do you have access to a fault code reader? Sometimes faults are logged even without the Check Engine Light coming on.

Could be the Mass Airflow Sensor (MAF), but issues with those are usually in the higher rev range. 4000rpm and higher.
 

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Whilst K and N type filters can be washed why would you wash a paper filter? Just bin it and replace if it’s clogged.



Why wouldn't you bin a dirty K&N style filter? Why clean and re-oil it, given the hassle / mess associated with this job? Why use a K&N style filter in the first place, given that paper element filters are generally cheaper and better? (i.e. larger filtration area giving better filtration for longer, and inherently better airflow, typically).



Regards,
John.

K and n style are designed to be cleaned so why would you throw it away? Paper element types are designed to be single use and replaced not cleaned.
Sounds like far more hassle blowing a paper one out,hose piping it and then giving it a bath than cleaning and re oiling a k and n type.

Personally don’t use washable filters I just bin filters annually and replace with new.
 

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K and n style are designed to be cleaned so why would you throw it away? Paper element types are designed to be single use and replaced not cleaned.
Sounds like far more hassle blowing a paper one out,hose piping it and then giving it a bath than cleaning and re oiling a k and n type.
I expect that cleaning a paper element filter would be a fairly similar amount of work as cleaning a K&N style filter, minus the need to re-oil it. I confess that I've never used a K&N filter specifically, but long ago I have used other 'oiled' media filters (i.e. oiled foam filters, and the oil makes a nasty mess). If I bought a car with a K&N style filter already fitted, it would get replaced quite soon because I don't think they are as good as paper filters, neither filtration nor airflow.

Paper filters may not be designed with cleaning / re-use in mind, but this doesn't mean they can't be. Paper filters are designed to be efficient (they are) and cheap to produce. They aren't 'designed' to be single use, but are cheap enough to buy that most people won't question it. Paper filter manufacturers are happy for users to think / assume that they can't ever be cleaned / re-used, but IMO this is not necessarily always true (but sometimes is true, depending on the nature of contamination).

If my car were driven in an urban environment, then the filter would likely become contaminated with oily diesel exhaust residue (all those trucks and busses in close proximity, day after day). In that case I don't think it would be worthwhile attempting to clean the paper element (though it might be possible with a strong solvent, such as immersing the filter in a bath of petrol, which I'm not reccomending...). My experience with predominantly rural driving is that the filter contamination tends to be a lot 'drier', meaning much less oily, so a lot easier to clean.

Last time I priced an air filter for my TS engine, it was $28 (from memory). So at that time I had recently replaced two tyres, the timing belt / tensioner, and was also spending about $100 for new spark plugs, about $20 for an oil filter, about $60 for oil (and also spending $s on servicing our other car, not to mention other bills and outgoings). I cleaned the air filter to save some $, and it worked well.

I recently bought a neglected 147 as a parts car. To my surprise it had a nearly pristine air filter in it, now wrapped in clingwrap and waiting on a shelf...

Regards,
John.
 
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