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Discussion Starter #1
Having just finished this I have prepared a little how to in case anyone else fancies taking a swing at it.

You will need eLearn which you can get from : here:

The job will take you a whole weekend and you need a good set of tools, loads of WD40, elbow grease and patience. There is nothing that technical, just a good helping of troublesome bolts.

Upsides are total cost was £399 for FSDs (larkspeed) plus <£100 for a bunch of new tools reusable on other jobs. Also the experience to now tackle ARB's, Drop links and Wishbones as required. Brakes too if you feel the need.

How to is in a PDF too big to post here so it is available from:

Fitting your own FSDs.pdf (360Kb)

Good Luck;)

Gary
 

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Great guide thanks for sharing.

Quick question, on changing the rears you mention an metal structure that can accommodate your axle stands, are you referring to the alloy crossmember? I've been advised not to use the crossmember for supporting the weight of the car because it could distort.
 

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Interesting guide Gary, would have tried to do it but removing bushes put me off as they needed doing 2.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great guide thanks for sharing.

Quick question, on changing the rears you mention an metal structure that can accommodate your axle stands, are you referring to the alloy crossmember? I've been advised not to use the crossmember for supporting the weight of the car because it could distort.
Eh yes. There is a real shortage of locations for it to go back there and it looked to be the best bet. I also used a second stand on the knuckle of the trailing arm but it was not really carrying the weight.

Interested to know where you can stand the car if not there?
 

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Ta very much for the info.:thumbs:
 

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I do't suppose it would be much extra work to upgrade the rear anti-roll bar at the same time would it?
 

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I do't suppose it would be much extra work to upgrade the rear anti-roll bar at the same time would it?
I guess the only difference would be the bottom drop link ball joints and having to strip both rears at the same time. I presume there is some support for the arb in the middle some where.

It wouldn't expect it to be much more effort. Check out eLearn (I don't have it on this PC)
 

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Couldn't afford the ARB upgrade, but have just printed your guide and I'm going to get cracking. I expect this to take me a while as I work really slowly.

Thanks for the guide :)
 

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can you tell us how you are finding the kon's compared to your standard shocks and were your standard shocks in good working order before removing them as people say they see a difference but also forget that replacing old for new will allways make a difference.
 

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Couldn't afford the ARB upgrade, but have just printed your guide and I'm going to get cracking. I expect this to take me a while as I work really slowly.

Thanks for the guide :)
It better be ready for the north run out :thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
can you tell us how you are finding the kon's compared to your standard shocks and were your standard shocks in good working order before removing them as people say they see a difference but also forget that replacing old for new will allways make a difference.
Was this Q for me?

The shocks that came off were in good nick and had done 30,000 miles. The difference at the time was pretty significant, principally when you head onto rough or pitted surface and you cringe ready for a crashy ride but instead the car rides em like a limo.

Cornering is definitely a little firmer but its more subjective.

I am really happy.

One thing that comes across from scouring the forums is that there are no bad reports from changing suspension no matter what flavour you go for. The stock shocks are great for smooth tarmac but rather harsh at everything else.
 

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When you fitted the Eibach springs, did the plastic covering on top and bottom of the spring cover the ends of the spring (ie to prevent 'clanking') or did they come almost to the end, but the metal ends of the spring butt up against the metal of the top plate and shock absorber?

I was just wondering if the metal to metal contact is how it is designed, and the covering is just either packaging material or designed to prevent stone chips or corrosion on the spring?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
When you fitted the Eibach springs, did the plastic covering on top and bottom of the spring cover the ends of the spring (ie to prevent 'clanking') or did they come almost to the end, but the metal ends of the spring butt up against the metal of the top plate and shock absorber?

I was just wondering if the metal to metal contact is how it is designed, and the covering is just either packaging material or designed to prevent stone chips or corrosion on the spring?
I didn't fit Eibach springs - just refitted the stock ones. You should have rubber moulded to fit the shape of the plates on the shock that hold the springs away from any metal. ie You reuse the old ones of the current set up.
 

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I didn't fit Eibach springs - just refitted the stock ones. You should have rubber moulded to fit the shape of the plates on the shock that hold the springs away from any metal. ie You reuse the old ones of the current set up.
My current coilovers have a brass plate attached to the top of the spring which butts up flat against the metal plate that comes with the car (not attached - is it called the 'top plate'? Thats how I refer to it). As things are at the moment, I have nothing to stop the Eibach springs sitting not-quite-flush against the top of that metal plate, nothing in between, so its metal to metal. I think the rubber thing you are talking about might have been thrown out when the coilovers were fitted. I guess I need to order them then.. :rolleyes: :(

At least I didn't fit the spring to the shock today, the pikey spring compressors I made weren't strong enough to compress the Eibachs fully, so I'll need to buy some proper ones. Also missed the delivery man who has my new ARB droplinks.. Things really aren't going my way today :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you are going for spring compressors get ones that fit your torque wrench. The spanner ones take for ever to operate.

The standard front set up was suspension strut which then has a large metal plate with a step in it about a third from the top. Above that was a very large rubber washer/padding that rested on that plate step and all. The spring then sat on that washer/padding with the end of the spring cradled in the step.

There was a second rubber pad that enveloped around the top of the spring and then there was the metal plate that has the threads that mount to the engine bay. I think you have the idea but it sounds like you might need two bits of rubber.

Why are you replacing coilovers BTW - are they done?
 

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If you are going for spring compressors get ones that fit your torque wrench. The spanner ones take for ever to operate.

The standard front set up was suspension strut which then has a large metal plate with a step in it about a third from the top. Above that was a very large rubber washer/padding that rested on that plate step and all. The spring then sat on that washer/padding with the end of the spring cradled in the step.

There was a second rubber pad that enveloped around the top of the spring and then there was the metal plate that has the threads that mount to the engine bay. I think you have the idea but it sounds like you might need two bits of rubber.

Why are you replacing coilovers BTW - are they done?
Cheers for that, I think I'm going to need to look at a diagram or something to work out what bits I need. I presume it is a similar set-up on the rear?

The coilovers have corroded and can't be adjusted - and they are too low and hard. Having experienced FSDs and Eibachs I had to have them :D

I made my own spring compressors, they were fine relieving the pressure on the coilovers but not strong enough to fully compress the Eibachs so I will have to go out and buy some.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Probably be a good idea to get a exploded view of things.

In addition to the rubber at the top and bottom of the spring there is a rubber sheath that goes over the damper rod to protect the shaft from dirt and dust. I think the backs are similar to the front but am struggling to recall what they looked like!
 

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Was this Q for me?

principally when you head onto rough or pitted surface and you cringe ready for a crashy ride but instead the car rides em like a limo.

Cornering is definitely a little firmer but its more subjective.

I am really happy.

The stock shocks are great for smooth tarmac but rather harsh at everything else.
I can second that. Fitted the FSD's on my otherwise std 2.4 SW and the improvement in ride is first class. Much smoother over bumps and kipping coppers. I too kept the std springs but think some slightly firmer ones would be OK.

Now the Red Dot remap has given me 181bhp and 233ft.lb it really rocks :lol:

Jerry
 

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Probably be a good idea to get a exploded view of things.

In addition to the rubber at the top and bottom of the spring there is a rubber sheath that goes over the damper rod to protect the shaft from dirt and dust. I think the backs are similar to the front but am struggling to recall what they looked like!
So there's a rubber bit that goes on top of the damper cup that the base of the spring sits onto, as well as a bit of rubber that sits on top of the spring? :confused:

I'm also missing the damper rod sheathes. Is the principle the same for the rear (ie a bit of rubber on top of the damper, spring on top of that, another bit of rubber on top of the spring)?

Do you have a photo of the metal bit that the damper rod goes through before the nut gets screwed on? As mine is thin, circular, black, with two threads coming out of the top (to go through two of the holes into the engine bay), I don't know if this is "part of the car" or "part of the coilovers that I'm removing".. :(

Cheers :)
 
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