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Discussion Starter #1
I'm 26 and am looking around at a lot of cars both old and new and have realised that I basically hate new cars and older cars are what I would feel best owning and driving. This would be my first car and am seriously considering getting a good condition 1600 or 2000 GT Junior. The problem I'm having though is that nobody in my family will support me in my decision and are reluctant on driving me to even look.

What I've found out is that everyone in the world is conditioned to being very anti-Alfa and a comment I get a lot while discussing what cars I'm looking at getting is that "it'll just break down all the time and you don't want that". This still hasn't stopped me from doing what research I have done on the internet and by reading the essential buyers guide to Giulia GT Coupes which also covers the Juniors. What I haven't been able to come across though is any solid information and advice concerning reliability of this series of classic Alfas. I am planning to follow the buyers guide to the letter when arranging and going for a viewing, and will only be going through with a purchase that is of very reasonable condition and does not require any initial doing up. If I make a purchase the car will be used as a general purpose car, but will not be used in a normal getting to and back from work way, but am planning on doing some travelling.

Any advice and help would be greatly appreciated, since I don't seem to be getting any support anywhere else.
 

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I can't talk much about what to look for regarding maintenance and reliability on personal experience.
The people I know that has had an alfa of that series never complained about it because they have them in mint condition mostly i guess. My father had a 1750 bertone from new, he says he never had a problem, and did 70.000 miles on it until he sold it for a newer gt 1600 (BIG mistake) and he never complained about it either (except for not being as fun as the 1750)

Alfas need extra care, but if taken care of correctly they are good cars. Problem is to find a decent mechanic that you can trust and spare parts, i am sure that if the car is in good condition you won't be disappointed, just make sure it is.

Good luck with your search, and i hope that you get a good one. Believe me, once you take your friends and family for a spin, they will be supporting your buy.
 

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To get a good one you will need to spend a decent amount of money....Go for it! They are generally as reliable as any "classic" car...there are no modern electronic brains in them to baffle you. most stuff can be done by a competent DIY'er. and loads of good spares people too in the UK, such as EB Spares, Alfaholics, etc, etc.
Get one with a good rust-free body and a good interior, mechanics can be repaired.
Tell your parents you can get classic car insurance, so you'll save a bomb that way!...oh and if you don't have a garage, then I wouldn't buy any classic to be honest!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey, Thanks a lot for the quick reply. Being new to owning cars also comes with being naive about what it takes to take special ongoing care to a car like this, which I am totally fine with having to do. I think that it's a good thing that I have not yet owned a newer car (though I have driven enough) and will be able to go in at the deep end and learn about the car that I buy much like people had to do when they first came out. Apart from changing the oil after the right number of miles etc, what sort of ongoing care and attention needs to be thought about?
 

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Hey spiderserie4, thanks to you too. Unforunately insurance will still be nearly £1500k due to me only have 6 months no claims as a named driver on another car and only holding my license for those 6 months. Have been told that it would be around that price for 2 years before being able to get that cheap classic car insurance. I am however willing to pay that if it means I get some years of (hopefully) no claims on board too.

The Juniors that I have looked at prior to now that I'd be taking a look at were £7-9k, and again I'd be follow the buyers guide ratings and help to correctly make sure that I'm getting a well looked after vehicle that doesn't require immedate attention.
 

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I'm with spiderserie4 on this. To preserve the bodywork and give you somewhere to work on it you'd really want to have a garage for it. They'll deteriorate in the weather faster than a modern if left out.

I use mine as a daily driver (although only 3 or 4000 miles a year) with no major problems but my service bills have been as high as a modern. And if it's wet I tend to use another car if I can.

Now I am middle aged and boring the worry I'd have as a parent would be a safety related one. Old cars don't have all the safety features and ultra safe handling characteristics of moderns. So be prepared for rubbish traction and tail happy handling in the wet. The twin servo brakes are difficult to get right too, so be prepared for less safe braking. And if you hit something there are no nice fluffy air bags to protect you. I wonder whether your family are concerned about reliability or safety, because if it were me it'd be the latter that'd worry me more.

Your insurance may come down a lot if you have access to another car and can point to it as a 'second' car. And if you can restrict miles.

If this sounds like I'm trying to put you off then I'm not. Just be aware of the pro's and con's. The Pro's make for a long list which I'm sure you're aware of.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks harryf for the advice. My family are definitely more on the side of reliability and maintainability due to seeing how cars have improved over the years and don't understand why I'd like to be put up with having to deal with a car that doesn't have the perks of a newer car that they're now used to.

Thanks for the advice on insurance, I'll definitely try pressuring companies on these things. Definitely with regards to milage since I am currently unemployed (quit my last job to take a rest and re-evaluate) and will not be driving it mon-fri to get too and from work.

I'm trying to convince myself I'm not having a quarter-life crisis ;p and am actually looking forward to having to learn about the car instead of no understanding all the microchips that do the magic stuff in new cars. I'm not letting handling and breaking put me off either. I'll learn how best to drive it, and will hopefully love it.
 

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Classic car insurance should only be a couple of hundred quid a year fully comp. on something like a giulia, and classic car policies are not interested in ncb, they only want you to be over 25 and own a second car. Ask around people like Footman James, Aon etc. failing a classic policy which requires you to own a second car, you can get policies which are mileage limited (say 4000 a year) which are cheaper.
Failing that get your dad to insure it, and put you on as a named driver. Or buy a cheapie with a year's MOT and insure it (say 400 quid 3rd party), then get the classic policy on the second car, the giulia! You don't even have to drive the cheapie!

For 1500 quid a year i would try anything! Insurance companies are the biggest rip off merchants alive!

Lastly, don't worry about air bags and all that mullarky....Jimmy Dean didn't have one.....Ok he went out with a bang, but at least he went out with a bang in a Porsche, not some astra or polo!:cool:
 

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Failing that get your dad to insure it, and put you on as a named driver.
Epic Fail there...

Possibly the worst piece of insurance advice ever. "Fronting" as insurance companies refer to it is a prime example of "obtaining pecuniary advantage by deception" and is treated accordingly WHEN you get found out.

I used to work in motor insurance. It was my job to sniff out the bozos who tried this. It was fun. But for me only, not them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I ended up getting an MGB GT instead this afternoon. Thanks for your help though! The family still isn't *that* pleased with me wanting an old car, but they're gonna have to put up with it now :D Insurance on that through footman james was £138 :)
 

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I ended up getting an MGB GT instead this afternoon. Thanks for your help though! The family still isn't *that* pleased with me wanting an old car, but they're gonna have to put up with it now :D Insurance on that through footman james was £138 :)
Big difference 1500 to 138 quid! Spend the difference on the car, much more fun!
Footman are a damn good company, who were one of the first to go into classic car insurance. MGB is a great little car too, with a second to none spares availibility! Post a photo when you have the time!
 

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Epic Fail there...

Possibly the worst piece of insurance advice ever. "Fronting" as insurance companies refer to it is a prime example of "obtaining pecuniary advantage by deception" and is treated accordingly WHEN you get found out.

I used to work in motor insurance. It was my job to sniff out the bozos who tried this. It was fun. But for me only, not them.
Sure glad you saw the light and changed careers!:lol:

Deception though is crap, if you'll excuse my french!....my dad insured my first car on his policy, cost him a bit more to put me as a named driver on the policy, but it was my car, not his, and I was still living in his home. Nothing deceptive about that.
Thats why here in europe (well, continental europe) you dont have all that insurance crap, you insure the car, not the driver, and here we can drive any car that is insured, in most every country. You can happily drive my car with my permission, and i dont have to tell the shi*te insurers a damned thing about you! Legal, correct, and as it should be, in my opinion!
 
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