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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

you might have seen my ad in the wanted section. I finally sold my RX7 via ebay, and now want to plan my 155 purchase.

If anyone could answer some/all of the following questons I would be very grateful:

1) Car will be a cheap third vehicle for me to tinker with and possibly use for a run to the Nurburgring as well as a track day or two....which engine (8v/16v/V6) offers best value for money?

2) What colour is best to look out for - I love the bright red, but it is very prone to fading. I also like the metallic blue more (I believe it is called Nordic blue) - were many made in that colour?

3) Any common faults that tend to make a 155 uneconomical to repair? I intend to work on it myself and am not too worried about it being a bit tatty, I just want the mechanicals to be in tip top condition!

Thanks in advance,

Ant.
 

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If you want something to hoon about in the 8v may be the one to go for - I think the 1.8 has a chain cam-drive, so you don't have that single most unreliable part of the 16v engines - the cambelt and tensioner.

The v6 is generally pretty well-'ard. The head-gasket is probably the only thing to really worry about there and that's not too shabby anyway.

On all models the wishbone bushes wear out and the bush is bonded to the arm, so you need new arms when the bushes wear. If you like a DIY job, but some people have re-used old arms with Powerflex bushes fitted and that sorts them more or less for good.


Ralf S.
 

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Ralf,

Thanks for the advice. I was leaning towards a four cylinder car as I would like to get hold of a spare engine to work on and maybe try a bit of porting/polishing. Obviously this will be simpler than on a V6.

Having said that, the sound and power of the V6 is a big attraction, but they seem to hold their values more. Plus I imagine the four cylinder cars are significantly lighter in the nose, and therefore probably handle better.

Wasn't aware of the suspension bushes wearing, but if powerflex aftermarket ones can be fitted, I would definately consider them.

Ant.
 

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The AO main site has a link to a step-by-step guide with photos, of how to fit new bushes. It's a bit agricultural (burn off the old ones as they're bonded to the arms.. etc.) and a fair bit of welly is required but it's "brute force" difficult rather than technically complex.

4-pots are allegedly more nimble it's true but you have to own an Arese v6 at some point in your life, I reckon.

Ralf S.
 
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