Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondered if anyone knows whether standard replacement exhaust parts are available for the G yet?

The centre pipe on my car is solid, but due to having surface rust on the outside it looks a bit ropey and it is bugging me..

It is just a plain pipe with no silencers in it, and was wondering if anyone knows where I can get a direct replacement.

The stainless ones are about £110 from alfisti all in, but I would rather have a steel one as they should be a lot cheaper and work just as well.


Failing that I might take it off, clean it up and paint it with high temperature paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That is good to know.

I don't think the exhaust will fail for another year or two but if it does at least I have the option of something other than an original from the stealers.

Normal plain sections for other cars seem to sell for anywhere between £10 and £40, which is considerably cheaper than a stainless one for the Alfa, even if it doesn't last as long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,723 Posts
Seems a bit pessimistic if it's only cosmetic. Our Multipla is on its original and that's a 2005. Have you decided to keep the Giulietta then?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I am not in a rush to sell.

The exhaust my well fail, it looks quite rusty and I am worried it may put off a potential buyer.

I am a bit dissapointed that it looks so bad at a relatively young age but at least it shouldn't be too difficult or expensive to fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,786 Posts
Just wondered if anyone knows whether standard replacement exhaust parts are available for the G yet?

The centre pipe on my car is solid, but due to having surface rust on the outside it looks a bit ropey and it is bugging me..

It is just a plain pipe with no silencers in it, and was wondering if anyone knows where I can get a direct replacement.

The stainless ones are about £110 from alfisti all in, but I would rather have a steel one as they should be a lot cheaper and work just as well.


Failing that I might take it off, clean it up and paint it with high temperature paint.
during regens, that pipe gets 650 degree gasses flowing through it.... does your high temp paint survive that?

I'd use an alu-zinc spray or so...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,786 Posts
I am not in a rush to sell.

The exhaust my well fail, it looks quite rusty and I am worried it may put off a potential buyer.

I am a bit dissapointed that it looks so bad at a relatively young age but at least it shouldn't be too difficult or expensive to fix.

they all look like that, irrespective of brand yet they last at least a decade and in case of alfa/fiat closer to 2...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
they all look like that, irrespective of brand yet they last at least a decade and in case of alfa/fiat closer to 2...
I don't think it will last a decade, I reckon it has another one or two years...
I think my exhaust paint will withstand 650ºC but will need to check. I was aware that they get very hot during a regen, but didn't realise it was that hot, especially as the DPF is right up the front and away from it.

Thanks for the help. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,786 Posts
I don't think it will last a decade, I reckon it has another one or two years...
I think my exhaust paint will withstand 650ºC but will need to check. I was aware that they get very hot during a regen, but didn't realise it was that hot, especially as the DPF is right up the front and away from it.

Thanks for the help. :)
the dpf can go up to 800 degrees and I've seen over 1000 degrees recorded with some cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
That is mental, I am surprised more cars don't catch fire.

Especially when you consider all of the plastic bits which are relatively close to the DPF.

Having said that, turbo chargers especially on Petrol cars get seriously hot as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,786 Posts
hence the accelerated corrosion on the surface... but in my experience that's where it stays.

Have you seen how such pipes are made? They start from sheet metal, bend it and weld where the edges meet. that weld is the most sensitive to corrosion. Leaks will start there, and most likely in a curb.

diesel exhaust gasses get hotter in the cat, and especially during dpf regen. the cat is flooded with hydrocarbons which result in rapid oxidation (burning) and an increase in EGT. We're always talking about burning fuel in the exhaust during regen, but it's specifically in the catalyst. Once the temperature in the dpf gets high enough, the fuel sent down the exhaust into the cat is less, just enough to keep the regen proces going (which is burning of soot in the DPF, just after the cat)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top