Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,172 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
From November 2012, all tyres sold in the EU market will need to be rated like a domestic appliance and receive a grading. This is great, in my opinion - it should make buying a tyre a bit easier than currently as you will (theoretically) have a standardised test result on which to base your decision.
Tyres-Online: Technical Information: EU Tyre Label

But, are the scores being based on the right characteristics for what is essentially a safety device?
Fuel efficiency in my eyes simply equates to less grip.
Noise is just comfort and less noise would again equate to less grip.
Wet grip is about the only characteristic that is sensible.
Where's the resistance to aquaplaning score? Or any mention of dry performance at all?

This is a good test that takes into account more factors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Hi

There is already some labelling on most tyres (possibly US influenced) with a grip and tread wear rating. Pity that the grip rating seems to be A to cover tyres from sticky as anything to pretty poor, with anything else being something you would only chose for training on a skid pan.

I am with you, noise and fuel efficiency are not really on my radar when choosing a tyre.

All the best

Keith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,151 Posts
The worrying thing to me, is that the vast majority of people will choose a tyre with good fuel efficiency over one that has good grip.

Having said that, it might make the makers of really poor tyres up their game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Hi

Mmm, I hope not but fear you might be right.

From the link

Fuel efficiency/Rolling Resistance

Fuel efficiency is important to reduce both CO2 emissions and the cost of driving. Tyres will be rated in categories from A to G with A meaning low fuel consumption and G high fuel consumption. Category D is not used. The difference between each category means a reduction or increase in fuel consumption of between 0.42 and 0.56 mpg for a 36 mpg car.


If I am reading that correctly the difference between the highest and lowest rated tyres is roughly 3.5mpg (not sure if the unused group D counts in some way) on a 36mpg car. So best to worst is a 10% difference.

All the best

Keith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,170 Posts
It's inevitable when you start measuring and grading by specific characteristics or by prescription, that you get things engineered to pass that test alone.

We saw it with the NCAP doodah, where it's almost impossible to find a 3* car now. One French manufacturer caught some criticism from Volvo as I recall for engineering the side-impact safety to pass the test, rather than as they would have from a purely safety point of view..

We saw it with emissions tests.. A lot of cars have an annoying flat spot at just the revs where the test measures fixed fuel consumption at a constant 56mph..

Now we'll see it with tyres. We'll have quiet and low resistance tyres that don't actually grip that well.

Having said that... being able to engineer anything to pass the tests does at least force the manufacturers to understand what affects that characteristic.. and as such you'd hope it would improve their ability to improve other areas of the product using what they have learnt.

Is it a good idea...? Maybe.

Will most punters buy tyres based on what's the cheapest... Always! :D


Ralf S.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,172 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Will most punters buy tyres based on what's the cheapest... Always! :D
I don't think that's true. Most punters will look to buy a cheaper tyre, not necessarily the cheapest. I'm (and I suspect most members on here) a special case because I like cars and know the value of a decent tyre over a ditch-finder.

With the new labelling I think most punters would plump for the tyres that have good scores, rather than the cheaper options - I think that's what the general aim is with this scheme.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top