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Whether I buy one to replace the Saxo depends on the selling price. I am not prepared to pay 50-60% more for electric than for the petrol. The other drawback that I see from other manufactures is the need to lease the battery at £50/month. That buys much more petrol than the Saxo consumes in a month.

Their first electric 500 made a loss on each unit so Marchionne told people not to buy one.
This one by Lapo’s company looks a cool rental car. https://www.garage-italia.com/special-projects/fiat-500-jolly-icon-e
Quirky but not sure I would want to travel far on seats made by hand weaving rope. They look like old style basket chairs and for those that are old enough you will remember the basket weave patterns on the contact areas of flesh. :cheeky:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Everything is going electric. Wonder if we will be able to buy another petrol car

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I read a very interesting interview with Bob Lutz on the Automotive New Europe web page. He had this to say about FCA's urge to merge and also electrification:

"Fiat Chrysler has the scale to make it on their own; they are not a small company.

Fiat is very large and, of course, is subject to the lack of profitability that everyone incurs in Europe and Latin America right now. Fiat in the United States has basically collapsed, folded in on itself. Alfa Romeo may pick up the slack. It certainly has some compelling crossovers.

As far as electric vehicles are concerned, that is becoming commoditized. You can go to Bosch or Nippon Denso and say, "We'd like a midsized electric crossover. Can you help us?" [And they'll say,] "Sure, we'll take you through the catalog. You order these sized motors, this control system, etc., etc., and it will hook up to a battery pack from Hitachi or LG Chem." There's no deep invention required anymore, like when we did the Chevy Volt. The supply base today, worldwide — including China — is more than capable of giving you everything you need to produce an electric vehicle. FCA doesn't need to partner with anyone for that.

As long as FCA watches its costs and continues to get rid of stuff that loses money and invests in brands and products that are highly profitable, such as the Ram and Jeep — those two are gold mines."

I really like his comments on electric cars. I was under the impression that it would take massive amounts of R&D costs, but that does not appear to be the case. This gives me hope for the future of FCA. Here is a link to this interview if you want to read all of it.

https://europe.autonews.com/automake...osn-and-future

Cheers,

Jeff
Dallas, Texas USA
 

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I read a very interesting interview with Bob Lutz on the Automotive New Europe web page. He had this to say about FCA's urge to merge and also electrification:

"Fiat Chrysler has the scale to make it on their own; they are not a small company.

Fiat is very large and, of course, is subject to the lack of profitability that everyone incurs in Europe and Latin America right now. Fiat in the United States has basically collapsed, folded in on itself. Alfa Romeo may pick up the slack. It certainly has some compelling crossovers.

As far as electric vehicles are concerned, that is becoming commoditized. You can go to Bosch or Nippon Denso and say, "We'd like a midsized electric crossover. Can you help us?" [And they'll say,] "Sure, we'll take you through the catalog. You order these sized motors, this control system, etc., etc., and it will hook up to a battery pack from Hitachi or LG Chem." There's no deep invention required anymore, like when we did the Chevy Volt. The supply base today, worldwide — including China — is more than capable of giving you everything you need to produce an electric vehicle. FCA doesn't need to partner with anyone for that.

As long as FCA watches its costs and continues to get rid of stuff that loses money and invests in brands and products that are highly profitable, such as the Ram and Jeep — those two are gold mines."

I really like his comments on electric cars. I was under the impression that it would take massive amounts of R&D costs, but that does not appear to be the case. This gives me hope for the future of FCA. Here is a link to this interview if you want to read all of it.

https://europe.autonews.com/automake...osn-and-future

Cheers,

Jeff
Dallas, Texas USA
That's a very interesting and pertinent point Bob Lutz makes re. electrification (but then he knows a thing or two about the industry!). All the hard work has already been done, and the future is playing catch-up with Tesla in terms of squeezing the maximum mileage out of each KwH. The real drain on R&D budgets is autonomous driving, which I still think is a lot further off than people think.
 

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That's a very interesting and pertinent point Bob Lutz makes re. electrification (but then he knows a thing or two about the industry!). All the hard work has already been done, and the future is playing catch-up with Tesla in terms of squeezing the maximum mileage out of each KwH. The real drain on R&D budgets is autonomous driving, which I still think is a lot further off than people think.
Alfa invented autonomous driving in 1983, when they put the ignition barrel for the 33 on the left hand side of the steering column.

If you could get the key into the barrel and turn it (clockwise) towards you, the car would always (or let's say "usually") get you home even though the next day you had a hangover, didn't remember anything of the journey and couldn't understand why your car was parked on your neighbour's flower bed, rather than your drive.

I think that's why the 33 didn't catch on.. it never parked itself properly.


Ralf S.
 
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