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Beyond what your instructor told you, what driving advice did you take as a learner that still chimes with you?

From my dad:

When in doubt, don’t [over take]

For smooth clutch control and braking finesse: ‘your toes must become as sensitive as your fingers’.

To not be a 5nob: ‘before you can drive fast, you must learn to drive slow.’

‘If the car in front brakes unexpectedly, maybe it has seen something you have missed.’

‘worry about oncoming traffic behind a tractor. Someone frustrated will try to overtake it.’

I’m sure there are loads more I’ve dialled into my defensive driving technique. What are your golden rules?
 

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2010 Alfa Romeo Mito 1.4, 2003 Alfa Romeo GTV Phase 3 JTS
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(When approaching a roundabout or juction) "focus on the car in front, not the cars on the roundabout" (until you are front of the que)
 

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My Dad was my instructor, and for some reason I still remember his advice when crossing speed bumps (even though they didn't exist then - but we had a railway level crossing). Brake before the obstruction and accelerate gently, that way the nose of the car rises. Perhaps what reminds me is the behaviour of other drivers who slam on brakes and whack the speed bump outside my house...
 

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2017 Guila 2.0 Tbi Lusso spec, 1972 S2 Spider Junior, wife drives 939 Spider, + Abarth 595
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I always look over my right shoulder in case I have a blindspot, or to make sure there isn't a motorbike that appeared all of a sudden
Every car has a blind spot. You just got to learn where it is.
 

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2017 Guila 2.0 Tbi Lusso spec, 1972 S2 Spider Junior, wife drives 939 Spider, + Abarth 595
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I'm sure it was tongue in cheek, but as a 'lad' doing a bit of car club rallying, I asked a quite successful, slightly older, club member for some tips on driving fast down lanes in dead of night (this was late 60's). His reply was "if you can keep a hedge on both sides of the car you are doing OK"
 

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Look beyond the car in front of you. This is almost useless advice now though with the number of Big Suvs and vans

Never take your petrol Alfa over 3,000 revs until warm, even less with most modern cars though.

Ignore your driving instructor’s advice to get into top gear as soon as possible. The cheapskate was only trying to save on his fuel bill :LOL:
 

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Turning across oncoming traffic? Brake lights & indicator on. Wheels straight ahead otherwise a rear end collision would tend to push you into another accident.

If you're not sure don't. Better 5 minutes late in this world than early in the next.

Don't let passengers distract you. Don't drive tired, stop every couple of hours for a stretch & coffee.

Lock it or lose it! Especially if you choose a flash car/popular model.

Working on a car? Always always use axle stands. Maintain it properly & get to know your car.
 

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As a biker as well as a driver the best advice I ever got was to pass your bike test even if you didn't intend to ever ride one. I actually took my bike test to ride them but more things stick with me from learning on a bike than a car. I'm with WantAGTA about looking at the cars in front of you at roundabouts rather than at what's on the roundabout until you're at the front. But as a biker it's ingrained in me to always check over your right shoulder even after looking in the mirrors. I always try to look the driver in the eye of a vehicle who is turning out of a side road to see if they've noticed me. I also look at where the wheels are pointing to give you an indication of where they intend to go (indicators on or not). I also constantly scan for an escape route usually on motorways in case I have to make a swift exit due to any collisions in front of me. Also don't tailgate cars with better brakes than you. Porsche's etc...And the best of all, always look 10 cars ahead (if you can as Muz points out).
 

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2017 Guila 2.0 Tbi Lusso spec, 1972 S2 Spider Junior, wife drives 939 Spider, + Abarth 595
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There are some real good points coming out in this thread. I guess to a great extent enthusiast drivers, like us, will engage far more with what we are doing than an A2B driver. Today there are far to many distractions in a car. When you are sat behind the wheel your concentration should be on the task in hand, focussing on what is going on the road and in the road around you. Use your mirrors more, you have blind spots NS as well as OS, check your NS before exiting a roundabout, some dope might have crept up on you left.
 

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As a biker as well as a driver the best advice I ever got was to pass your bike test even if you didn't intend to ever ride one. I actually took my bike test to ride them but more things stick with me from learning on a bike than a car. I'm with WantAGTA about looking at the cars in front of you at roundabouts rather than at what's on the roundabout until you're at the front. But as a biker it's ingrained in me to always check over your right shoulder even after looking in the mirrors. I always try to look the driver in the eye of a vehicle who is turning out of a side road to see if they've noticed me. I also look at where the wheels are pointing to give you an indication of where they intend to go (indicators on or not). I also constantly scan for an escape route usually on motorways in case I have to make a swift exit due to any collisions in front of me. Also don't tailgate cars with better brakes than you. Porsche's etc...And the best of all, always look 10 cars ahead (if you can as Muz points out).
Well since I can't afford regular flying lessons, seems no harm in having fun on a bike for a few days like you said!
 

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Don’t wait to turn right with your front wheels already turned. Not necessary now cars have power steering and if you are steering straight ahead and you’re hit from behind you won’t be pushed into path of oncoming traffic.
 

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Mirror, signal, manoeuvre. Simple. Do those three things every time and I’m sure a lot less accidents would happen.
Too many move and then signal or maybe don’t bother to signal at all these days :(
 

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also I learned on a naughty drivers course, keep the back seat belts always fixed in even with no passengers, if your rear ended the contents of your boot won't come flying through if it's a biggie.
 

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Too many move and then signal or maybe don’t bother to signal at all these days :(
It goes beyond that with many on the road today, signal, I'm coming out anyway, bugger waiting for gap.
 

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On signalling, my car driving instructor said:

Just remember, a signal is a declaration of intent, not a confirmation of action.

He also pointed out that your signals are there to inform other road users - which includes pedestrians.
 
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